hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
William Pitt 341 3 Browse Search
France (France) 298 0 Browse Search
Canada (Canada) 166 0 Browse Search
Halifax (Canada) 152 0 Browse Search
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) 152 0 Browse Search
New Castle, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) 138 0 Browse Search
Bute 134 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 120 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 120 0 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 120 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition.. Search the whole document.

Found 521 total hits in 133 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Charles Yorke (search for this): chapter 16
ative, their chartered immunities, and their rights as men. When, in May, 1760, Franklin appeared with able counsel to defend the liberties of his adopted home before the Board of Trade, he was encountered by Pratt, the attorney-general, and Charles Yorke, the son of Lord Hardwicke, then the solicitor-general, who appeared for the prerogative and the proprietaries. Of the acts complained of, it was held that some were unjust to the private fortunes of the Penns, and all, by their dangerous enemoluments had depended on his compliance; that it was subversive of the constitution for the Assembly first to take to themselves the supervision of the treasure, and then to employ it to corrupt the governor. Even the liberal Pratt, as well as Yorke, said much of the intention to establish a democracy, in place of his Majesty's government, and urged upon the proprietaries their duty of resistance. The Lords of Trade found that in Pennsylvania, as in every other colony, the delegates far ex
De Vaudreuil (search for this): chapter 16
treating the helpless Canadians with humanity, and with no loss of lives except in passing the rapids, on the seventh of September he met before Montreal the army under Murray, who, as he came up from Quebec, had intimidated the people-and amused himself by now and then burning a village and hanging a Canadian. The next day, Haviland arrived with forces from Crown Point. Thus the three armies came together in overwhelming strength to take an open town of a few hundred inhabitants, which Vaudreuil had resolved to give up on the first appearance of the English; and on the eighth day of September, the flag of St. George floated in triumph on the gate of Montreal, the admired island of Jacques Cartier, the ancient hearth of the council-fires of the Wyandots, the village consecrated by the Roman Church to the Virgin Mary, a site connected by rivers and lakes with an inland chap. XVI.} 1760. world, and needing only a somewhat milder climate to be one of the most attractive spots on the
George Townshend (search for this): chapter 16
uld have reduced Canada. His delay and retreat to Crown Point gave De Levi, Montcalm's successor, a last opportunity of concentrating the remaining forces of France at Jacques Cartier for the recovery of Quebec. In that city Saunders had left abundant stores and heavy artillery, with a garrison of seven thousand men, under the command of the brave but shallow Murray. When De Levi found it impossible to surprise the place in mid-winter, he still resolved on undertaking its reduction. George Townshend, now in England, publicly rejected the opinion, that it was able to hold out a considerable siege; and Murray, the commander, himself prepared for the last extremity, by selecting the Isle of Orleans for his refuge. As soon as the river opened, De Levi proceeded with an army of less than ten thousand Murray in his official account writes 15,000, and in the same letter comes down to 10,000 men and 500 barbarians.men to besiege Quebec. On the twenty-eighth of April, the chap. XVI
feeble and unmanly surrender of just authority. The early life of Edmund Burke is not much known. I have seen a letter from John Pownall to Lieut. Gov. Colden of New York, dated 10 January, 1760, recommending Thomas Burke for the post of agent for that colony, and describing him as a gentleman of honor, ability, and industry, who has particularly made the state and interest of our colonies his study. If this was meant for Edmund (and there appears to have been no one of the Burkes named Thomas), it would seem that the great orator was not then a person of importance enough for a patronizing secretary of the Board of Trade to remember his christian name. Edmund came to be agent of New York, but at a later day and under other auspices. At this time he acted in the employment of one of the Board of Trade; and at that Board and in Ireland rendered service enough to obtain through Halifax a pension of £ 300. It is observable that Burke never reveals any thing relating to his employer
Oxenbridge Thacher (search for this): chapter 16
ad promised him a seat on the bench at the first vacancy. Oakes Angiers Journal, i. But Bernard appointed Thomas Hutchinson, originally a merchant by profession, subservient in his politics, already lieutenant governor, councillor, and judge of probate. A burst of indignation broke from the colony at this union of such high executive, legislative, and judicial functions in one person, who was not bred to the law, and was expected to interpret it for the benefit of the prerogative. Oxenbridge Thacher, a lawyer of great merit, a man of sagacity and patriotism, respected for learning, ability, purity of life, and moderation, discerned the dangerous character of Hutchinson's ambition, and from this time denounced him openly and always; while James Otis, the younger, offended as a son and a patriot, resigned the office of advocate-general, and by his eloquence in opposition to the royalists, set the province in a flame. But the new chief justice received the iterated application for w
Illinois river (United States) (search for this): chapter 16
nd of Jacques Cartier, the ancient hearth of the council-fires of the Wyandots, the village consecrated by the Roman Church to the Virgin Mary, a site connected by rivers and lakes with an inland chap. XVI.} 1760. world, and needing only a somewhat milder climate to be one of the most attractive spots on the continent. The capitulation included all Canada, which was said to extend to the crest of land dividing branches of Erie and Michigan from those of the Miami, the Wabash, and the Illinois rivers. Property and religion were cared for in the terms; but for civil liberty no stipulation was even thought of. Thus Canada, under the forms of a despotic administration, came into the possession of England by conquest; and in a conquered country the law was held to be the pleasure of the king. On the fifth day after the capitulation, Rogers departed with two hundred rangers to carry English banners to the upper posts. Rogers: Journals, 197. At Frontenac, now Kingston, an Indian hu
Erie (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
n the continent. The capitulation included all Canada, which was said to extend to the crest of land dividing branches of Erie and Michigan from those of the Miami, the Wabash, and the Illinois rivers. Property and religion were cared for in the tety brought them wild fowl and venison. At Niagara, they provided themselves with the fit costume of the wilderness. From Erie in the chilly days of November they went forward in boats, being the first considerable party of men whose tongue was the unmolested, with an escort of warriors, to assist in driving his herd of oxen along the shore. To the tribes southeast of Erie he sent word that the strangers came with his consent; yet while he studied to inform himself how wool could be changed in white men within his dominions but at his pleasure. After this interview, Rogers hastened to the straits which connect Erie and St. Clair, and took possession of Detroit. Thus was Michigan won by Great Britain, yet not for itself. There were th
nite consequence of North America, which, by its increasing inhabitants, would consume British manufactures; by its trade, employ innumerable British ships; by its provisions, support the sugar islands; by its products, fit out the whole navy of England. Peace, too, was to be desired in behalf of England's ally, the only Protestant sovereign in Germany who could preserve the privileges of his religion chap. XVI.} 1760. from being trampled under foot. How calmly, said Bath, the King of Prussia possesses himself under distress! how ably he can extricate himself! having amazing resources in his own unbounded genius. The warm support of the Protestant nation of Great Britain must be called forth, or the war begun to wrest Silesia from him would, in the end, be found to be a war to overturn the liberties and religion of Germany. Peace was, moreover, to be solicited from love to political freedom. The increase of the navy, army, and public debt, and the consequent influence of
Sandusky, Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
a river Rogers: Concise Account of North America, 240. Rogers: Journal, 214. The River was not the Cuyahoga, but one forty-six miles to the eastward of the river then called the Elk, and one hundred nine and a half miles to the eastward from Sandusky Bay. Howe's Ohio, 125. See the maps of Evans, 1755, and of T. Pownall, 1776. On parting from Pontiac, Rogers says he kept a southwesterly course for about forty-eight miles; which could not be done by a vessel sailing from Cleveland to Sandusky. Rogers seems not accurate, though professing to be so to the half or the quarter of a mile. The distances appear to refer to the Ashtabula River; the name Chogage to the Geauga. by a deputation of Ottawas from the west. Pontiac, said they, is the chief chap. XVI.} 1760. and lord of the country you are in; wait till he can see you with his own eyes. When Pontiac and Rogers met, the savage chieftain asked,—How have you dared to enter my country without my leave? I come, replied tile
Barnstable, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
In September, Sewall died, to the universal sorrow of the province; and the character of his successor would control the decision of the court on the legality of writs of assistance, involving the whole subject of enforcing the British Acts of Trade; by the utmost exertion of arbitrary and irresponsible discretion; as well as the degree of political support which the judiciary would grant to the intended new system of administration. Public opinion selected for the vacancy James Otis, of Barnstable, a good lawyer, a member chap. XVI.} 1760. of the Council, and acceptable to the community. Besides, former governors had promised him a seat on the bench at the first vacancy. Oakes Angiers Journal, i. But Bernard appointed Thomas Hutchinson, originally a merchant by profession, subservient in his politics, already lieutenant governor, councillor, and judge of probate. A burst of indignation broke from the colony at this union of such high executive, legislative, and judicial functi
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...