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er of Lord Temple and George Grenville, he was able to write in June,—Join, my love, with me, in most humble and grateful thanks to the Almighty. The siege of Quebec was raised on the seventeenth of May, with every happy circumstance. The enemy left their camp standing, abandoned forty pieces of cannon. Swanton arrived there in the Vanguard on the fifteenth, and destroyed all the French shipping, six or seven in number. Happy, happy day! My joy and hurry are inexpressible. Pitt to Lady Hester, 27 June Amherst had been notified of the intended siege; chap. XVI.} 1760. but he persevered in the systematic and tardy plan which he had formed. When the spring opened, he had no difficulties to encounter in taking possession of Canada, but such as he himself should create. A country suffering from a four years scarcity, a disheartened, starving peasantry, the feeble remains of five or six battalions, wasted by incredible services, and not recruited from France, offered no oppos
George Grenville (search for this): chapter 16
delayed the works. The English garrison, reduced by death during the winter, sickness, and the unfortunate battle, to twenty-two hundred effective men, exerted themselves with alacrity. The women, and even the cripples, were set to light work. In the French army not a word would be listened to of the possibility of failure. But Pitt's sagacity had foreseen and prepared for all. A fleet at his bidding was on its way to relieve the city; and to his wife, the sister of Lord Temple and George Grenville, he was able to write in June,—Join, my love, with me, in most humble and grateful thanks to the Almighty. The siege of Quebec was raised on the seventeenth of May, with every happy circumstance. The enemy left their camp standing, abandoned forty pieces of cannon. Swanton arrived there in the Vanguard on the fifteenth, and destroyed all the French shipping, six or seven in number. Happy, happy day! My joy and hurry are inexpressible. Pitt to Lady Hester, 27 June Amherst had
James Delancey (search for this): chapter 16
forgotten,—an only son, heir to very large estates, a man of spirit and honor, keenly sensitive to right, faultless as a son, a son-in-law, a husband, possessing a gentleness of nature and a candor that ever endeared him to the friends of freedom. In the opinion of Cadwallader Colden, the president of the Council, This plan is in Colden's handwriting. No date is annexed; but its general tone points to the year 1760, just before he was made lieu-tenant-governor, and after the death of Delancey. He includes in his plan permanent commissions to the judges, which was the subject that at that time occupied his mind. the democratical or popular part of the American constitution was too strong for the other parts, and in time might swallow them both up, and endanger the dependence of the plantations on the crown of Great Britain. His reme- chap. XVI.} 1760. dies were, a perpetual revenue, fixed salaries, and an hereditary council of privileged landholders, in imitation of the Lords
T. Pownall (search for this): chapter 16
ssachusetts, a statesman who had generous feelings, but no logic, flashes of sagacity, but no clear comprehension, who from inclination associated with liberal men, even while he framed plans for strengthening the prerogative, affirmed, and many times reiterated, that the independence of America was certain, and near at hand. Not for centuries, replied Hutchinson, who knew the strong affection of New England for the home of its fathers. See Hutchinson to T. Pownall, 8 March, 1766, where Pownall is reminded of the prophecy. But the Lords of Trade shared the foreboding. In every province, the people, from design, or from their nature and position, seemed gradually confirming their sway. Virginia, once so orderly, had assumed the right of equitably adjusting the emoluments secured by law to the Church. In 1759, Sherlock, then Bishop of London, had confided his griefs to the chap. XVI.} 1760. Board of Trade, at the great change in the temper of the people of Virginia. It is
Edmund Burke (search for this): chapter 16
the author. I know no authority for attributing the pamphlet to Edmund Burke; but compare on the intimacy between the two, Edmund Burke's CorEdmund Burke's Correspondence, i. 36. the kinsman and friend, and often the associate, of Edmund Burke, found arguments for retaining Guadaloupe in the opportunEdmund Burke, found arguments for retaining Guadaloupe in the opportunity it would afford of profitable investment, the richness of the soil, the number of its slaves, the absence of all rivalry between England a all reflecting men in his native land for his hearers, replying to Burke, defended the annexation of Canada as the only mode of securing Ameecially memorable: Pitt, the secretary of state for America, and Edmund Burke, a man of letters, at that time in the service of William Gerard Hamilton, the colleague of Lord Halifax. Burke shared the opinions of the Board of Trade, that all the offensive acts of Pennsylvania shoulle and unmanly surrender of just authority. The early life of Edmund Burke is not much known. I have seen a letter from John Pownall to Li
active, the preceding chap. XVI.} 1760. campaign would have reduced Canada. His delay and retreat to Crown Point gave De Levi, Montcalm's successor, a last opportunity of concentrating the remaining forces of France at Jacques Cartier for the recres and heavy artillery, with a garrison of seven thousand men, under the command of the brave but shallow Murray. When De Levi found it impossible to surprise the place in mid-winter, he still resolved on undertaking its reduction. George Townsheimself prepared for the last extremity, by selecting the Isle of Orleans for his refuge. As soon as the river opened, De Levi proceeded with an army of less than ten thousand Murray in his official account writes 15,000, and in the same letterit dans le choc environ 800 hommes. though Murray's report increased it more than eight-fold. During the two next days, De Levi opened trenches against the town; but the frost delayed the works. The English garrison, reduced by death during the wi
r centuries, replied Hutchinson, who knew the strong affection of New England for the home of its fathers. See Hutchinson to T. Pownall, 8 March, 1766, where Pownall is reminded of the prophecy. But the Lords of Trade shared the foreboding. In every province, the people, from design, or from their nature and position, seemed gradually confirming their sway. Virginia, once so orderly, had assumed the right of equitably adjusting the emoluments secured by law to the Church. In 1759, Sherlock, then Bishop of London, had confided his griefs to the chap. XVI.} 1760. Board of Trade, at the great change in the temper of the people of Virginia. It is surely high time, said he, to look about us and consider of the several steps lately taken to the diminution of the prerogative of the crown. The rights of the clergy and the authority of the king must stand or fall together. Connecticut, wrote a royalist Churchman, in July, 1760, to Seeker, the Archbishop of Canterbury, Connectic
the city, left the advantageous ground which he first occupied, and incautiously hazarded an attack near Sillery Wood. The advance-guard, under De Bourlamarque, met the shock with firmness, and returned the attack with ardor. In danger of being surrounded, Murray was obliged to fly, leaving his very fine train of artillery, and losing a thousand men. The French appear to have lost about three hundred, Mante, 281. The loss of the French was not so considerable as that of the English. Memoires, 183. L'on perdit dans le choc environ 800 hommes. though Murray's report increased it more than eight-fold. During the two next days, De Levi opened trenches against the town; but the frost delayed the works. The English garrison, reduced by death during the winter, sickness, and the unfortunate battle, to twenty-two hundred effective men, exerted themselves with alacrity. The women, and even the cripples, were set to light work. In the French army not a word would be listened to of t
C. Calvert (search for this): chapter 16
at the peace, acts of parliament will be moved for amendment of government and a standing force in America, and that the colonies, for whose protection the force will be established, must bear at least the greatest share of charge. This, wrote Calvert, in January, 1760, Calvert to H. Sharpe, Janunary, 1760 will occasion a tax; and he made preparations to give the Board of Trade his answer to their propositions on the safest modes of raising a revenue in America by act of parliament. ForCalvert to H. Sharpe, Janunary, 1760 will occasion a tax; and he made preparations to give the Board of Trade his answer to their propositions on the safest modes of raising a revenue in America by act of parliament. For all what you Americans say of your loyalty, observed Pratt, the attorney-general, better known in America as Lord Camden, to Franklin, and notwithstanding your boasted affection, you will one day set up for independence. No such idea, replied Franklin, sincerely, is entertained by the Americans, or ever will be, unless you grossly abuse them. Very true, rejoined Pratt; that I see will happen, and will produce the event. Quincy's Life of Quincy. 269. Peace with foreign states was to bri
his is erroneous. Pitt at that time had not even seen Franklin, as we know from a memoir by Franklin himself. Gordon adds, that Pitt, in 1759 or 1760, wrote to Fauquier, of Virginia, that they should tax the colonies when the war was over, and that Fauquier dissuaded from it. I have seen Fauquier's correspondence; both the letteFauquier dissuaded from it. I have seen Fauquier's correspondence; both the letters to him, and his replies; and there is nothing in either of them giving a shadow of corroboration to the statement. Gordon may have built on rumor, or carelessly substituted the name of Pitt for Halifax and the Board of Trade. The narrative in the text I could confirm by many special quotations, and still more by the uniform thave been told that Governor Bernard in particular has also done business in the same way. Lieutenant Gov. Sharpe to his brother Philip, 8 Feb., 1760. I, said Fauquier, of Virginia, have never been prevailed on to grant one; though I have been tempted by large offers, and pitiful stories of relations lying in French dungeons fo
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