hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
William Pitt 341 3 Browse Search
France (France) 298 0 Browse Search
Canada (Canada) 166 0 Browse Search
Halifax (Canada) 152 0 Browse Search
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) 152 0 Browse Search
New Castle, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) 138 0 Browse Search
Bute 134 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 120 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 120 0 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 120 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition.. Search the whole document.

Found 521 total hits in 133 results.

... 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
n the trade of the continent with the foreign islands, but only in time of war to distress the enemy by famine. In August, the same month in which this impassioned interdict was issued, Francis Bernard, whom the Board of Trade favored as the most willing friend to the English Church and to British authority, was removed from the government of New Jersey to that of Massachusetts. But the distrust that was never to be removed, had already planted itself very deeply in the province. These English, men said to one another, will overturn every thing. We must resist them; and that by force. And they reasoned together on the necessity of a general attention to the militia, to their exercises and discipline; for they repeated, we must resist in arms. John Adams's Works, IV. 6. In September of chap. XVI.} 1760. that year, Bernard manifested the purpose of his appointment, by informing the legislature of Massachusetts that they derived blessings from their subjection to Great Britai
Oxenbridge Thacher (search for this): chapter 16
ad promised him a seat on the bench at the first vacancy. Oakes Angiers Journal, i. But Bernard appointed Thomas Hutchinson, originally a merchant by profession, subservient in his politics, already lieutenant governor, councillor, and judge of probate. A burst of indignation broke from the colony at this union of such high executive, legislative, and judicial functions in one person, who was not bred to the law, and was expected to interpret it for the benefit of the prerogative. Oxenbridge Thacher, a lawyer of great merit, a man of sagacity and patriotism, respected for learning, ability, purity of life, and moderation, discerned the dangerous character of Hutchinson's ambition, and from this time denounced him openly and always; while James Otis, the younger, offended as a son and a patriot, resigned the office of advocate-general, and by his eloquence in opposition to the royalists, set the province in a flame. But the new chief justice received the iterated application for w
William Pitt (search for this): chapter 16
listened to of the possibility of failure. But Pitt's sagacity had foreseen and prepared for all. Apy day! My joy and hurry are inexpressible. Pitt to Lady Hester, 27 June Amherst had been no will snatch at the first moment of peace, said Pitt. The desire of my heart, said George the Seconeace. Our North American conquests, said he to Pitt and Newcastle, and to the world, cannot be reta good sort of people, he urged upon Halifax and Pitt, that the Church should be supported, and the cin these transactions was especially memorable: Pitt, the secretary of state for America, and Edmund made to win the immediate interposition of William Pitt, to appall the colonies by his censure, or Board of Trade; I can trace no such purpose to Pitt. In the history of the American Revolution by the inquisitive but credulous Gordon, Pitt is said to have told Franklin, that, when the war closethis subject. In vehement and imperative words, Pitt rebuked the practice; not with a view permanent[5 more...]
Thomas Burke (search for this): chapter 16
e early life of Edmund Burke is not much known. I have seen a letter from John Pownall to Lieut. Gov. Colden of New York, dated 10 January, 1760, recommending Thomas Burke for the post of agent for that colony, and describing him as a gentleman of honor, ability, and industry, who has particularly made the state and interest of oployment of one of the Board of Trade; and at that Board and in Ireland rendered service enough to obtain through Halifax a pension of £ 300. It is observable that Burke never reveals any thing relating to his employers; and in his historic sketches of the origin of the troubles with America, spares the memory of Halifax. Indeed the name of Halifax scarcely appears in all his published writings. We may see in what school Burke learnt the doctrine of the right of Parliament to tax America. The time was near at hand when the young Irishman's opinions upon the extent of British authority over America would become of moment. Great efforts were made to win the
September 27th, 1760 AD (search for this): chapter 16
f economy that promised to the world freedom of commerce, a brotherhood of the nations, and mutual benefits from mutual prosperity. He rejoiced that the great master of English historic style,—who by his natural character and deliberate opinion was at heart a republican, Hume's Correspondence in Burton's Life of Hume.—loved to promote by his writings that common good of mankind, which the American, inventing a new form of expression, called the interest of humanity; Franklin to Hume, 27 Sept, 1760. Writings, VIII. 210. and he summoned before the mind of the Scottish philosopher that audience of innumerable millions which a century or two would prepare in America for all who should use English well. England cheerfully and proudly accepted the counsels which his magnanimity inspired. Promising herself wealth from colonial trade, she was also occupied by the thought of filling the wilderness, instructing it with the products of her intelligence, and blessing it with free instituti
September 7th (search for this): chapter 16
eal, by Colohel Haviland, found the fort on Isle-aux-Noix deserted. Amherst himself led the main army of ten thousand men by way of Oswego; it is not easy to say why; for the labor of getting there was greater than that of proceeding directly upon Montreal. After toiling to Oswego, he descended the St. Lawrence cautiously, taking possession of the feeble works at Ogdensburg; treating the helpless Canadians with humanity, and with no loss of lives except in passing the rapids, on the seventh of September he met before Montreal the army under Murray, who, as he came up from Quebec, had intimidated the people-and amused himself by now and then burning a village and hanging a Canadian. The next day, Haviland arrived with forces from Crown Point. Thus the three armies came together in overwhelming strength to take an open town of a few hundred inhabitants, which Vaudreuil had resolved to give up on the first appearance of the English; and on the eighth day of September, the flag of St.
September 8th (search for this): chapter 16
the rapids, on the seventh of September he met before Montreal the army under Murray, who, as he came up from Quebec, had intimidated the people-and amused himself by now and then burning a village and hanging a Canadian. The next day, Haviland arrived with forces from Crown Point. Thus the three armies came together in overwhelming strength to take an open town of a few hundred inhabitants, which Vaudreuil had resolved to give up on the first appearance of the English; and on the eighth day of September, the flag of St. George floated in triumph on the gate of Montreal, the admired island of Jacques Cartier, the ancient hearth of the council-fires of the Wyandots, the village consecrated by the Roman Church to the Virgin Mary, a site connected by rivers and lakes with an inland chap. XVI.} 1760. world, and needing only a somewhat milder climate to be one of the most attractive spots on the continent. The capitulation included all Canada, which was said to extend to the crest of
February 8th, 1760 AD (search for this): chapter 16
XVI.} 1760. engage in the carrying-trade of the French sugar, islands; and they gained by its immense profits. This trade was protected by flags of truce, which were granted by the colonial governors. For each flag, wrote Horatio Sharpe, who longed to share in the spoils, for each flag, my neighbor, Governor Denny, receives a handsome douceur, and I have been told that Governor Bernard in particular has also done business in the same way. Lieutenant Gov. Sharpe to his brother Philip, 8 Feb., 1760. I, said Fauquier, of Virginia, have never been prevailed on to grant one; though I have been tempted by large offers, and pitiful stories of relations lying in French dungeons for want of such flags. Fauquier to Pitt, 1760. I have very many letters on this subject. In vehement and imperative words, Pitt rebuked the practice; not with a view permanently to restrain the trade of the continent with the foreign islands, but only in time of war to distress the enemy by famine. In Augus
August 12th, 1761 AD (search for this): chapter 16
imitation of the Lords of parliament. At the same time, he warned against the danger of applying a standing revenue to favorites, or bestowing beneficial employments on strangers alone, to the great discouragement of the people of the plantations. Influenced by a most favorable opinion of Colden's zeal for the rights of the crown, Lord Halifax conferred on him the vacant post of lieutenantgov-ernor of New York. Compare Colden to Halifax, 11 August, 1760, and Golden to John Pownall, 12 August, 1761. In the neighboring province of New Jersey, Francis Bernard, as its governor, a royalist, selected for office by Halifax, had, from 1758, the time of his arrival in America, been brooding over the plans for enlarging royal power which he afterwards reduced to form. But Pennsylvania, of all the colonies, led the van of what the royalists called Democracy. Its Assembly succeeded in obtaining its governor's assent to their favorite assessment bill, by which the estates of the proprie
April 28th (search for this): chapter 16
ng its reduction. George Townshend, now in England, publicly rejected the opinion, that it was able to hold out a considerable siege; and Murray, the commander, himself prepared for the last extremity, by selecting the Isle of Orleans for his refuge. As soon as the river opened, De Levi proceeded with an army of less than ten thousand Murray in his official account writes 15,000, and in the same letter comes down to 10,000 men and 500 barbarians.men to besiege Quebec. On the twenty-eighth of April, the chap. XVI.} 1760. vainglorious governor, marching out from the city, left the advantageous ground which he first occupied, and incautiously hazarded an attack near Sillery Wood. The advance-guard, under De Bourlamarque, met the shock with firmness, and returned the attack with ardor. In danger of being surrounded, Murray was obliged to fly, leaving his very fine train of artillery, and losing a thousand men. The French appear to have lost about three hundred, Mante, 281.
... 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14