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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition.. Search the whole document.

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France (France) (search for this): chapter 16
n would have reduced Canada. His delay and retreat to Crown Point gave De Levi, Montcalm's successor, a last opportunity of concentrating the remaining forces of France at Jacques Cartier for the recovery of Quebec. In that city Saunders had left abundant stores and heavy artillery, with a garrison of seven thousand men, under trom a four years scarcity, a disheartened, starving peasantry, the feeble remains of five or six battalions, wasted by incredible services, and not recruited from France, offered no opposition The party which was conducted from Crown Point towards Montreal, by Colohel Haviland, found the fort on Isle-aux-Noix deserted. Amherst hi from the necessity of commerce, would cease to massacre the planters, and cherish perpetual peace. There would be no vast inland frontier to be defended against France, at an incalculable expense. The number of British subjects would, indeed, increase more rapidly than if the mountains should remain their barrier; but they woul
ns, had been cherished in America as the friend of its liberties, and who now in his old age pleaded for the termination of a truly national war by a solid and reasonable peace. Our North American conquests, said he to Pitt and Newcastle, and to the world, cannot be retaken. Give up none of them; or you lay the foundation of another war. Unless we would choose to be obliged to keep great bodies of troops in America, in full peace, we can never leave the French any footing in Canada. Not Senegal and Goree, nor even Guadaloupe, ought to be insisted upon as a condition of peace, provided Canada be left to us. Such seemed the infinite consequence of North America, which, by its increasing inhabitants, would consume British manufactures; by its trade, employ innumerable British ships; by its provisions, support the sugar islands; by its products, fit out the whole navy of England. Peace, too, was to be desired in behalf of England's ally, the only Protestant sovereign in Germany w
Swanton, Vt. (Vermont, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
d be listened to of the possibility of failure. But Pitt's sagacity had foreseen and prepared for all. A fleet at his bidding was on its way to relieve the city; and to his wife, the sister of Lord Temple and George Grenville, he was able to write in June,—Join, my love, with me, in most humble and grateful thanks to the Almighty. The siege of Quebec was raised on the seventeenth of May, with every happy circumstance. The enemy left their camp standing, abandoned forty pieces of cannon. Swanton arrived there in the Vanguard on the fifteenth, and destroyed all the French shipping, six or seven in number. Happy, happy day! My joy and hurry are inexpressible. Pitt to Lady Hester, 27 June Amherst had been notified of the intended siege; chap. XVI.} 1760. but he persevered in the systematic and tardy plan which he had formed. When the spring opened, he had no difficulties to encounter in taking possession of Canada, but such as he himself should create. A country suffering
Canterbury (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 16
. In 1759, Sherlock, then Bishop of London, had confided his griefs to the chap. XVI.} 1760. Board of Trade, at the great change in the temper of the people of Virginia. It is surely high time, said he, to look about us and consider of the several steps lately taken to the diminution of the prerogative of the crown. The rights of the clergy and the authority of the king must stand or fall together. Connecticut, wrote a royalist Churchman, in July, 1760, to Seeker, the Archbishop of Canterbury, Connecticut is little more than a mere democracy; most of them upon a level, and each man thinking himself an able divine and politician; and to make them a good sort of people, he urged upon Halifax and Pitt, that the Church should be supported, and the charters of that colony, and of its eastward neighbors, be demolished. The present republican form of those governments was indeed pernicious. The people were rampant in their high notions of liberty, and thence perpetually running into
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
he plans for enlarging royal power which he afterwards reduced to form. But Pennsylvania, of all the colonies, led the van of what the royalists called Democracy. Ihe same policy. Already the negative had been wrested from the Council of Pennsylvania, and from the proprietaries themselves. The latter, therefore, in March, 17he proprietaries their duty of resistance. The Lords of Trade found that in Pennsylvania, as in every other colony, the delegates far exceeded the largest claims ofect of an informal capitulation between them and the agent of the people of Pennsylvania, and was included among those chap. XVI.} 1760. that were confirmed. Theke shared the opinions of the Board of Trade, that all the offensive acts of Pennsylvania should be rejected, and censured with severity the temporizing facility of Lampions of prerogative. So little did he interest himself in the strifes of Pennsylvania, that, during his whole ministry, Franklin was never once admitted to his pr
y of England. Peace, too, was to be desired in behalf of England's ally, the only Protestant sovereign in Germany who could preserve the privileges of his religion chap. XVI.} 1760. from being trampled under foot. How calmly, said Bath, the King of Prussia possesses himself under distress! how ably he can extricate himself! having amazing resources in his own unbounded genius. The warm support of the Protestant nation of Great Britain must be called forth, or the war begun to wrest Silesia from him would, in the end, be found to be a war to overturn the liberties and religion of Germany. Peace was, moreover, to be solicited from love to political freedom. The increase of the navy, army, and public debt, and the consequent influence of the crown, was much too great for the independency of the constitution. Earl of Bath's Letter to Two Great Men, &c., 1760. The generous and wise sentiments of the Earl of Bath were acceptable to the people of England. But there were
Michigan (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
Chapter 16: Possession taken of Michigan and the country on the Lakes.—Pitts administration continued. 1760. had Amherst been more active, the preceding chap. XVI.} 1760. campaign would have reduced Canada. His delay and retreat to Crown Point gave De Levi, Montcalm's successor, a last opportunity of concentrating tof the most attractive spots on the continent. The capitulation included all Canada, which was said to extend to the crest of land dividing branches of Erie and Michigan from those of the Miami, the Wabash, and the Illinois rivers. Property and religion were cared for in the terms; but for civil liberty no stipulation was even tominions but at his pleasure. After this interview, Rogers hastened to the straits which connect Erie and St. Clair, and took possession of Detroit. Thus was Michigan won by Great Britain, yet not for itself. There were those who foresaw that the acquisition of Canada was the chap. XVI.} 1760. prelude of American independen
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
o litigate any point with the factious assemblies; but upon an approaching peace, it would be proper to insist on the king's prerogative. Lord Halifax, said Seeker of that nobleman, about the time of his forfeiting an advantageous marriage by a licentious connection with an chap. XVI.} 1760. opera girl, Lord Halifax is earnest for bishops in America, and he hoped for success in that great point, when it should please God to bless them with a peace. The opinions of Ellis, the governor of Georgia, who had represented the want of a small military force to keep the Assembly from encroachments; of Lyttleton, who, from South Carolina, had sent word that the root of all the difficulties of the king's servants lay in having no standing revenue, were kept in mind. It has been hinted to me, said the secretary of Maryland, that, at the peace, acts of parliament will be moved for amendment of government and a standing force in America, and that the colonies, for whose protection the force wi
Kingston, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
h, and the Illinois rivers. Property and religion were cared for in the terms; but for civil liberty no stipulation was even thought of. Thus Canada, under the forms of a despotic administration, came into the possession of England by conquest; and in a conquered country the law was held to be the pleasure of the king. On the fifth day after the capitulation, Rogers departed with two hundred rangers to carry English banners to the upper posts. Rogers: Journals, 197. At Frontenac, now Kingston, an Indian hunting-party brought them wild fowl and venison. At Niagara, they provided themselves with the fit costume of the wilderness. From Erie in the chilly days of November they went forward in boats, being the first considerable party of men whose tongue was the English that ever spread sails on Lake Erie or swept it with their oars. The Indians on the Lakes were at peace, united under Pontiac, the great chief of the Ottawas, happy in a country fruitful of corn and abounding in ga
Newcastle (Canada) (search for this): chapter 16
; and the public mind was discussing how far the conquests should be retained. So great a subject of consideration had never before presented itself to British statesmen. We have had bloodshed enough, urged Pulteney, Earl of Bath, who, when in the House of Commons, had been cherished in America as the friend of its liberties, and who now in his old age pleaded for the termination of a truly national war by a solid and reasonable peace. Our North American conquests, said he to Pitt and Newcastle, and to the world, cannot be retaken. Give up none of them; or you lay the foundation of another war. Unless we would choose to be obliged to keep great bodies of troops in America, in full peace, we can never leave the French any footing in Canada. Not Senegal and Goree, nor even Guadaloupe, ought to be insisted upon as a condition of peace, provided Canada be left to us. Such seemed the infinite consequence of North America, which, by its increasing inhabitants, would consume British
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