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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition.. Search the whole document.

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Oakes Angiers Journal (search for this): chapter 16
ole subject of enforcing the British Acts of Trade; by the utmost exertion of arbitrary and irresponsible discretion; as well as the degree of political support which the judiciary would grant to the intended new system of administration. Public opinion selected for the vacancy James Otis, of Barnstable, a good lawyer, a member chap. XVI.} 1760. of the Council, and acceptable to the community. Besides, former governors had promised him a seat on the bench at the first vacancy. Oakes Angiers Journal, i. But Bernard appointed Thomas Hutchinson, originally a merchant by profession, subservient in his politics, already lieutenant governor, councillor, and judge of probate. A burst of indignation broke from the colony at this union of such high executive, legislative, and judicial functions in one person, who was not bred to the law, and was expected to interpret it for the benefit of the prerogative. Oxenbridge Thacher, a lawyer of great merit, a man of sagacity and patriotism, r
Robert R. Livingston (search for this): chapter 16
should be compelled to yield a revenue at the disposition of the crown. Some of them, at New York, suggested such a requisition of quitrents, as would be virtually a general land-tax, by act of parliament. While I can wield this weapon, cried Livingston, the large landholder, grasping his sword, England shall never get it but with my heart's blood. Reunion of Great Britain, &c., 88. In the Assembly at New York, which had been chosen in the previous year, the popular party was strengthened b the popular alderman, a merchant of New York, and William, who represented his brother's manor, a scholar, and an able lawyer, the incorruptible advocate of civil and religious liberty, in manners plain, by his nature republican. Nor may Robert R. Livingston, of Duchess County, be forgotten,—an only son, heir to very large estates, a man of spirit and honor, keenly sensitive to right, faultless as a son, a son-in-law, a husband, possessing a gentleness of nature and a candor that ever endeared
Francis Bernard (search for this): chapter 16
and Golden to John Pownall, 12 August, 1761. In the neighboring province of New Jersey, Francis Bernard, as its governor, a royalist, selected for office by Halifax, had, from 1758, the time of hh flag, my neighbor, Governor Denny, receives a handsome douceur, and I have been told that Governor Bernard in particular has also done business in the same way. Lieutenant Gov. Sharpe to his brotemy by famine. In August, the same month in which this impassioned interdict was issued, Francis Bernard, whom the Board of Trade favored as the most willing friend to the English Church and to Brust resist in arms. John Adams's Works, IV. 6. In September of chap. XVI.} 1760. that year, Bernard manifested the purpose of his appointment, by informing the legislature of Massachusetts that tors had promised him a seat on the bench at the first vacancy. Oakes Angiers Journal, i. But Bernard appointed Thomas Hutchinson, originally a merchant by profession, subservient in his politics,
. The generous and wise sentiments of the Earl of Bath were acceptable to the people of England. But there were not wanting a reflecting few who doubted. Foremost among them, William Burke, Remarks on the Letter to Two Great Men. Compare Almon's Biographical Anecdotes of Eminent Persons, II. 347. Mr. William Burke has always been said and believed to have been the author. I know no authority for attributing the pamphlet to Edmund Burke; but compare on the intimacy between the two, Edmwar had been an American war, Lord Halifax, one of the few whom inclinations, studies, opportunities, and talents had made perfectly masters of the state and interests of the colonies, should be appointed to negotiate peace. Private letters Almon's Anecdotes of the Earl of Chatham, III. Appendix M. from Guadaloupe gave warning that a country of such vast resources, and so distant as North America, could never remain long subject to Britain. The acquisition of Canada would strengthen Ame
William Burke (search for this): chapter 16
titution. Earl of Bath's Letter to Two Great Men, &c., 1760. The generous and wise sentiments of the Earl of Bath were acceptable to the people of England. But there were not wanting a reflecting few who doubted. Foremost among them, William Burke, Remarks on the Letter to Two Great Men. Compare Almon's Biographical Anecdotes of Eminent Persons, II. 347. Mr. William Burke has always been said and believed to have been the author. I know no authority for attributing the pamphlet to Mr. William Burke has always been said and believed to have been the author. I know no authority for attributing the pamphlet to Edmund Burke; but compare on the intimacy between the two, Edmund Burke's Correspondence, i. 36. the kinsman and friend, and often the associate, of Edmund Burke, found arguments for retaining Guadaloupe in the opportunity it would afford of profitable investment, the richness of the soil, the number of its slaves, the absence of all rivalry between England and a tropical island. Besides, he added, to alarm his countrymen, if the people of our colonies find no check from Canada, they will exte
Thomas Hutchinson (search for this): chapter 16
and many times reiterated, that the independence of America was certain, and near at hand. Not for centuries, replied Hutchinson, who knew the strong affection of New England for the home of its fathers. See Hutchinson to T. Pownall, 8 March, 17Hutchinson to T. Pownall, 8 March, 1766, where Pownall is reminded of the prophecy. But the Lords of Trade shared the foreboding. In every province, the people, from design, or from their nature and position, seemed gradually confirming their sway. Virginia, once so orderly, had arnors had promised him a seat on the bench at the first vacancy. Oakes Angiers Journal, i. But Bernard appointed Thomas Hutchinson, originally a merchant by profession, subservient in his politics, already lieutenant governor, councillor, and judy and patriotism, respected for learning, ability, purity of life, and moderation, discerned the dangerous character of Hutchinson's ambition, and from this time denounced him openly and always; while James Otis, the younger, offended as a son and a
George Townshend (search for this): chapter 16
uld have reduced Canada. His delay and retreat to Crown Point gave De Levi, Montcalm's successor, a last opportunity of concentrating the remaining forces of France at Jacques Cartier for the recovery of Quebec. In that city Saunders had left abundant stores and heavy artillery, with a garrison of seven thousand men, under the command of the brave but shallow Murray. When De Levi found it impossible to surprise the place in mid-winter, he still resolved on undertaking its reduction. George Townshend, now in England, publicly rejected the opinion, that it was able to hold out a considerable siege; and Murray, the commander, himself prepared for the last extremity, by selecting the Isle of Orleans for his refuge. As soon as the river opened, De Levi proceeded with an army of less than ten thousand Murray in his official account writes 15,000, and in the same letter comes down to 10,000 men and 500 barbarians.men to besiege Quebec. On the twenty-eighth of April, the chap. XVI
Thomas Pownall (search for this): chapter 16
the river then called the Elk, and one hundred nine and a half miles to the eastward from Sandusky Bay. Howe's Ohio, 125. See the maps of Evans, 1755, and of T. Pownall, 1776. On parting from Pontiac, Rogers says he kept a southwesterly course for about forty-eight miles; which could not be done by a vessel sailing from Clevelhe necessity of radical changes in the government in favor of the central authority. While they waited for peace as the proper season for their interference, Thomas Pownall, the Governor of Massachusetts, a statesman who had generous feelings, but no logic, flashes of sagacity, but no clear comprehension, who from inclination assertain, and near at hand. Not for centuries, replied Hutchinson, who knew the strong affection of New England for the home of its fathers. See Hutchinson to T. Pownall, 8 March, 1766, where Pownall is reminded of the prophecy. But the Lords of Trade shared the foreboding. In every province, the people, from design, or fro
l of corn and abounding in game. As the Americans advanced triumphantly towards the realms where the native huntsman had chased the deer through the unbroken woodlands, they were met at the mouth of a river Rogers: Concise Account of North America, 240. Rogers: Journal, 214. The River was not the Cuyahoga, but one forty-six miles to the eastward of the river then called the Elk, and one hundred nine and a half miles to the eastward from Sandusky Bay. Howe's Ohio, 125. See the maps of Evans, 1755, and of T. Pownall, 1776. On parting from Pontiac, Rogers says he kept a southwesterly course for about forty-eight miles; which could not be done by a vessel sailing from Cleveland to Sandusky. Rogers seems not accurate, though professing to be so to the half or the quarter of a mile. The distances appear to refer to the Ashtabula River; the name Chogage to the Geauga. by a deputation of Ottawas from the west. Pontiac, said they, is the chief chap. XVI.} 1760. and lord of the co
e of the king. On the fifth day after the capitulation, Rogers departed with two hundred rangers to carry English banners to the upper posts. Rogers: Journals, 197. At Frontenac, now Kingston, an Indian hunting-party brought them wild fowl anbroken woodlands, they were met at the mouth of a river Rogers: Concise Account of North America, 240. Rogers: Journal, Rogers: Journal, 214. The River was not the Cuyahoga, but one forty-six miles to the eastward of the river then called the Elk, and one hund, 1755, and of T. Pownall, 1776. On parting from Pontiac, Rogers says he kept a southwesterly course for about forty-eight t be done by a vessel sailing from Cleveland to Sandusky. Rogers seems not accurate, though professing to be so to the halftill he can see you with his own eyes. When Pontiac and Rogers met, the savage chieftain asked,—How have you dared to entis dominions but at his pleasure. After this interview, Rogers hastened to the straits which connect Erie and St. Clair,
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