hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
William Pitt 341 3 Browse Search
France (France) 298 0 Browse Search
Canada (Canada) 166 0 Browse Search
Halifax (Canada) 152 0 Browse Search
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) 152 0 Browse Search
New Castle, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) 138 0 Browse Search
Bute 134 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 120 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 120 0 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 120 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition.. Search the whole document.

Found 521 total hits in 133 results.

... 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
Chapter 16: Possession taken of Michigan and the country on the Lakes.—Pitts administration continued. 1760. had Amherst been more active, the preceding chap. XVI.} 1760. campaign would have reduced Canada. His delay and retreat to Crown Point gave De Levi, Montcalm's successor, a last opportunity of concentrating the remaining forces of France at Jacques Cartier for the recovery of Quebec. In that city Saunders had left abundant stores and heavy artillery, with a garrison of seven thousand men, under the command of the brave but shallow Murray. When De Levi found it impossible to surprise the place in mid-winter, he still resolved on undertaking its reduction. George Townshend, now in England, publicly rejected the opinion, that it was able to hold out a considerable siege; and Murray, the commander, himself prepared for the last extremity, by selecting the Isle of Orleans for his refuge. As soon as the river opened, De Levi proceeded with an army of less than ten
Thomas Penn (search for this): chapter 16
of the proprietaries, its just prerogative, to check the growing influence of assemblies, by distinguishing, what they are perpetually confounding, the executive from the legislative power. When, in July, the subject was discussed before the Privy Council, Lord Mansfield made the extraordinary motion, that the attorney and solicitor general be instructed to report their opinion whether his Majesty could not disapprove of parts of an act and confirm other parts of it. Proprietary to Thomas Penn, 22 August, 1760. But so violent an attempt to extend the king's prerogative, at the expense of the people of the colonies and the proprietaries, met with no favor. At last, of the seventeen acts objected to, the six which encroached most on the executive power were negatived by the king; but by the influence of Lord Mansfield, and against the advice of the Board of Trade, the assessment bill, which taxed the estates of the proprietaries, was made the subject of an informal capitulatio
trigue and faction; and he advocated an act of parliament establishing one model for all America. As a principle of union, a viceroy, or lord-lieutenant, was to be appointed, with a council of two from each province, like the Amphictyons of Greece, to consult for union, stability, and the good of the whole; and there being the strongest connection between fearing God and honoring the king, prayer was made for bishops, at least two or three. From the draught of a correspondence with Archbishop Secker. In the winter after the taking of Quebec, the rumor got abroad of the fixed design in England to remodel the provinces. John Adams: Works, IV. 6, 7. Many officers of the British army expressed the opinion openly, that America chap. XVI.} 1760. should be compelled to yield a revenue at the disposition of the crown. Some of them, at New York, suggested such a requisition of quitrents, as would be virtually a general land-tax, by act of parliament. While I can wield this weapon, c
g from his love of English freedom and his truly American heart. Appealing also to the men of letters, he communed with David Hume on the jealousy of trade; and shared the more agreeable system of economy that promised to the world freedom of commerce, a brotherhood of the nations, and mutual benefits from mutual prosperity. He rejoiced that the great master of English historic style,—who by his natural character and deliberate opinion was at heart a republican, Hume's Correspondence in Burton's Life of Hume.—loved to promote by his writings that common good of mankind, which the American, inventing a new form of expression, called the interest of humanity; Franklin to Hume, 27 Sept, 1760. Writings, VIII. 210. and he summoned before the mind of the Scottish philosopher that audience of innumerable millions which a century or two would prepare in America for all who should use English well. England cheerfully and proudly accepted the counsels which his magnanimity inspired. Prom
John Adams (search for this): chapter 16
king, prayer was made for bishops, at least two or three. From the draught of a correspondence with Archbishop Secker. In the winter after the taking of Quebec, the rumor got abroad of the fixed design in England to remodel the provinces. John Adams: Works, IV. 6, 7. Many officers of the British army expressed the opinion openly, that America chap. XVI.} 1760. should be compelled to yield a revenue at the disposition of the crown. Some of them, at New York, suggested such a requisition e another, will overturn every thing. We must resist them; and that by force. And they reasoned together on the necessity of a general attention to the militia, to their exercises and discipline; for they repeated, we must resist in arms. John Adams's Works, IV. 6. In September of chap. XVI.} 1760. that year, Bernard manifested the purpose of his appointment, by informing the legislature of Massachusetts that they derived blessings from their subjection to Great Britain. Subjection to Gr
William Gerard Hamilton (search for this): chapter 16
inst the advice of the Board of Trade, the assessment bill, which taxed the estates of the proprietaries, was made the subject of an informal capitulation between them and the agent of the people of Pennsylvania, and was included among those chap. XVI.} 1760. that were confirmed. There were two men in England whose interest in these transactions was especially memorable: Pitt, the secretary of state for America, and Edmund Burke, a man of letters, at that time in the service of William Gerard Hamilton, the colleague of Lord Halifax. Burke shared the opinions of the Board of Trade, that all the offensive acts of Pennsylvania should be rejected, and censured with severity the temporizing facility of Lord Mansfield as a feeble and unmanly surrender of just authority. The early life of Edmund Burke is not much known. I have seen a letter from John Pownall to Lieut. Gov. Colden of New York, dated 10 January, 1760, recommending Thomas Burke for the post of agent for that colony, a
Arthur Dobbs (search for this): chapter 16
utchinson's ambition, and from this time denounced him openly and always; while James Otis, the younger, offended as a son and a patriot, resigned the office of advocate-general, and by his eloquence in opposition to the royalists, set the province in a flame. But the new chief justice received the iterated application for writs of assistance, and delayed the decision of the court only till he could write to England. There the Board of Trade had matured its system. They agreed with what Dobbs had written from North Carolina, that it was not prudent, when unusual supplies were asked, to litigate any point with the factious assemblies; but upon an approaching peace, it would be proper to insist on the king's prerogative. Lord Halifax, said Seeker of that nobleman, about the time of his forfeiting an advantageous marriage by a licentious connection with an chap. XVI.} 1760. opera girl, Lord Halifax is earnest for bishops in America, and he hoped for success in that great point, w
ith provisions from America, was connected with the first strong expressions of discontent in New England. American merchants were incited, by the French commercial regulations, to chap. XVI.} 1760. engage in the carrying-trade of the French sugar, islands; and they gained by its immense profits. This trade was protected by flags of truce, which were granted by the colonial governors. For each flag, wrote Horatio Sharpe, who longed to share in the spoils, for each flag, my neighbor, Governor Denny, receives a handsome douceur, and I have been told that Governor Bernard in particular has also done business in the same way. Lieutenant Gov. Sharpe to his brother Philip, 8 Feb., 1760. I, said Fauquier, of Virginia, have never been prevailed on to grant one; though I have been tempted by large offers, and pitiful stories of relations lying in French dungeons for want of such flags. Fauquier to Pitt, 1760. I have very many letters on this subject. In vehement and imperative words
Benjamin Franklin (search for this): chapter 16
the interior must manufacture for themselves, Franklin evoked from futurity the splendid vision of wo not rise, but when the winds blow. Thus Franklin offered the great advice which sprung from hi expression, called the interest of humanity; Franklin to Hume, 27 Sept, 1760. Writings, VIII. 210.and their rights as men. When, in May, 1760, Franklin appeared with able counsel to defend the libeennsylvania, that, during his whole ministry, Franklin was never once admitted to his presence. Evet credulous Gordon, Pitt is said to have told Franklin, that, when the war closed, he should take meroneous. Pitt at that time had not even seen Franklin, as we know from a memoir by Franklin himselfFranklin himself. Gordon adds, that Pitt, in 1759 or 1760, wrote to Fauquier, of Virginia, that they should tax thel, better known in America as Lord Camden, to Franklin, and notwithstanding your boasted affection, t up for independence. No such idea, replied Franklin, sincerely, is entertained by the Americans, [1 more...]
Writings, VIII. 210. and he summoned before the mind of the Scottish philosopher that audience of innumerable millions which a century or two would prepare in America for all who should use English well. England cheerfully and proudly accepted the counsels which his magnanimity inspired. Promising herself wealth from colonial trade, she was also occupied by the thought of filling the wilderness, instructing it with the products of her intelligence, and blessing it with free institutions. Homer sang from isle to isle; the bards of England would find hear- chap. XVI.} 1760. ers in every zone, and in the admiration of genius continent respond to continent. Pitt would not weigh the West India islands against half a hemisphere; he desired to retain them both; but being overruled in the cabinet he held fast to Canada. The liberties of the English in America were his delight; he made it his glory to extend the boundaries throughout which they were to be enjoyed; and yet, at that ve
... 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14