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. England began hostilities for Nova Scotia and the Ohio. These she had gained, and had added Canada and Guadaloupe. I will snatch at the first moment of peace, said Pitt. The desire of my heart, said George the Second to parliament, is to see a stop put to the effusion of blood; and the public mind was discussing how far the conquests should be retained. So great a subject of consideration had never before presented itself to British statesmen. We have had bloodshed enough, urged Pulteney, Earl of Bath, who, when in the House of Commons, had been cherished in America as the friend of its liberties, and who now in his old age pleaded for the termination of a truly national war by a solid and reasonable peace. Our North American conquests, said he to Pitt and Newcastle, and to the world, cannot be retaken. Give up none of them; or you lay the foundation of another war. Unless we would choose to be obliged to keep great bodies of troops in America, in full peace, we can neve
erely, is entertained by the Americans, or ever will be, unless you grossly abuse them. Very true, rejoined Pratt; that I see will happen, and will produce the event. Quincy's Life of Quincy. 269. Peace with foreign states was to bring for America an alteration of charters, a new system of administration, a standing army, and for the support of that chap. XVI.} 1760. army a grant of an American revenue by a British parliament. The decision was settled, after eleven years reflection and experience, by Halifax and his associates at the Board of Trade, and for its execution needed only a prime minister and a resolute monarch to lend it countenance. In the midst of these schemes, surrounded by victory, the aged George the Second died suddenly of apoplexy; and on the morning of the twenty-fifth day of October, 1760, his grandson, the pupil of Leicester House, then but twenty-two years of age, while riding with the Earl of Bute, was overtaken by a secret message that he was king.
Rutherford (search for this): chapter 16
ppear so to every man whose head is not too much affected with popular madness or political enthusiasm. The islands, from their weakness, can never revolt; but, if we acquire all Canada, we shall soon find North America itself too powerful and too populous to be governed by us chap. XVI.} 1760. at a distance. If Canada were annexed, the Americans, it was objected in conversation, would be at leisure to manufacture for themselves, and throw off their dependence on the mother country. Rutherford's Importance of the Colonies, 9, 10. On the other side, Benjamin Franklin, having many in England and all reflecting men in his native land for his hearers, replying to Burke, defended the annexation of Canada as the only mode of securing America. The Indians, from the necessity of commerce, would cease to massacre the planters, and cherish perpetual peace. There would be no vast inland frontier to be defended against France, at an incalculable expense. The number of British subject
Charles Pratt (search for this): chapter 16
ights as men. When, in May, 1760, Franklin appeared with able counsel to defend the liberties of his adopted home before the Board of Trade, he was encountered by Pratt, the attorney-general, and Charles Yorke, the son of Lord Hardwicke, then the solicitor-general, who appeared for the prerogative and the proprietaries. Of the ac answer to their propositions on the safest modes of raising a revenue in America by act of parliament. For all what you Americans say of your loyalty, observed Pratt, the attorney-general, better known in America as Lord Camden, to Franklin, and notwithstanding your boasted affection, you will one day set up for independence. No such idea, replied Franklin, sincerely, is entertained by the Americans, or ever will be, unless you grossly abuse them. Very true, rejoined Pratt; that I see will happen, and will produce the event. Quincy's Life of Quincy. 269. Peace with foreign states was to bring for America an alteration of charters, a new system of
De Vaudreuil (search for this): chapter 16
treating the helpless Canadians with humanity, and with no loss of lives except in passing the rapids, on the seventh of September he met before Montreal the army under Murray, who, as he came up from Quebec, had intimidated the people-and amused himself by now and then burning a village and hanging a Canadian. The next day, Haviland arrived with forces from Crown Point. Thus the three armies came together in overwhelming strength to take an open town of a few hundred inhabitants, which Vaudreuil had resolved to give up on the first appearance of the English; and on the eighth day of September, the flag of St. George floated in triumph on the gate of Montreal, the admired island of Jacques Cartier, the ancient hearth of the council-fires of the Wyandots, the village consecrated by the Roman Church to the Virgin Mary, a site connected by rivers and lakes with an inland chap. XVI.} 1760. world, and needing only a somewhat milder climate to be one of the most attractive spots on the
incessant from Halifax and the Board of Trade; I can trace no such purpose to Pitt. In the history of the American Revolution by the inquisitive but credulous Gordon, Pitt is said to have told Franklin, that, when the war closed, he should take measures of authority against the colonies. This is erroneous. Pitt at that time had not even seen Franklin, as we know from a memoir by Franklin himself. Gordon adds, that Pitt, in 1759 or 1760, wrote to Fauquier, of Virginia, that they should tax the colonies when the war was over, and that Fauquier dissuaded from it. I have seen Fauquier's correspondence; both the letters to him, and his replies; and there is nothing in either of them giving a shadow of corroboration to the statement. Gordon may have built on rumor, or carelessly substituted the name of Pitt for Halifax and the Board of Trade. The narrative in the text I could confirm by many special quotations, and still more by the uniform tendency of the correspondence at that
Richard Lyttleton (search for this): chapter 16
t on the king's prerogative. Lord Halifax, said Seeker of that nobleman, about the time of his forfeiting an advantageous marriage by a licentious connection with an chap. XVI.} 1760. opera girl, Lord Halifax is earnest for bishops in America, and he hoped for success in that great point, when it should please God to bless them with a peace. The opinions of Ellis, the governor of Georgia, who had represented the want of a small military force to keep the Assembly from encroachments; of Lyttleton, who, from South Carolina, had sent word that the root of all the difficulties of the king's servants lay in having no standing revenue, were kept in mind. It has been hinted to me, said the secretary of Maryland, that, at the peace, acts of parliament will be moved for amendment of government and a standing force in America, and that the colonies, for whose protection the force will be established, must bear at least the greatest share of charge. This, wrote Calvert, in January, 1760,
a revenue in America by act of parliament. For all what you Americans say of your loyalty, observed Pratt, the attorney-general, better known in America as Lord Camden, to Franklin, and notwithstanding your boasted affection, you will one day set up for independence. No such idea, replied Franklin, sincerely, is entertained by the Americans, or ever will be, unless you grossly abuse them. Very true, rejoined Pratt; that I see will happen, and will produce the event. Quincy's Life of Quincy. 269. Peace with foreign states was to bring for America an alteration of charters, a new system of administration, a standing army, and for the support of that chap. XVI.} 1760. army a grant of an American revenue by a British parliament. The decision was settled, after eleven years reflection and experience, by Halifax and his associates at the Board of Trade, and for its execution needed only a prime minister and a resolute monarch to lend it countenance. In the midst of these sche
David Hume (search for this): chapter 16
from his love of English freedom and his truly American heart. Appealing also to the men of letters, he communed with David Hume on the jealousy of trade; and shared the more agreeable system of economy that promised to the world freedom of commerc great master of English historic style,—who by his natural character and deliberate opinion was at heart a republican, Hume's Correspondence in Burton's Life of Hume.—loved to promote by his writings that common good of mankind, which the AmericaHume.—loved to promote by his writings that common good of mankind, which the American, inventing a new form of expression, called the interest of humanity; Franklin to Hume, 27 Sept, 1760. Writings, VIII. 210. and he summoned before the mind of the Scottish philosopher that audience of innumerable millions which a century or two woHume, 27 Sept, 1760. Writings, VIII. 210. and he summoned before the mind of the Scottish philosopher that audience of innumerable millions which a century or two would prepare in America for all who should use English well. England cheerfully and proudly accepted the counsels which his magnanimity inspired. Promising herself wealth from colonial trade, she was also occupied by the thought of filling the wilde<
s of parliament will be moved for amendment of government and a standing force in America, and that the colonies, for whose protection the force will be established, must bear at least the greatest share of charge. This, wrote Calvert, in January, 1760, Calvert to H. Sharpe, Janunary, 1760 will occasion a tax; and he made preparations to give the Board of Trade his answer to their propositions on the safest modes of raising a revenue in America by act of parliament. For all what you Americans say of your loyalty, observed Pratt, the attorney-general, better known in America as Lord Camden, to Franklin, and notwithstanding your boasted affection, you will one day set up for independence. No such idea, replied Franklin, sincerely, is entertained by the Americans, or ever will be, unless you grossly abuse them. Very true, rejoined Pratt; that I see will happen, and will produce the event. Quincy's Life of Quincy. 269. Peace with foreign states was to bring for America an a
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