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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition.. Search the whole document.

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Loudoun (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ith its worst venom pursued the fifteen hundred, chap. VIII.} 1755. who remained south of the Ristigouche. Lieut. Gov. Belcher to Lords of Trade, 14 April, 1761. Once those who dwelt in Pennsylvania presented a humble petition to the Earl of Loudoun, then the British commander-in-chief in America; and the cold-hearted peer, offended that the prayer was made in French, seized their five principal men, who in their own land had been persons of dignity and substance, and shipped them to England, with the request, that they might be kept from ever again becoming troublesome by being consigned to service as common sailors on board ships of war. Loudoun to Secretary of State, 25 April, 1757. No doubt existed of the king's approbation. Lords of Trade to Gov. Lawrence, 25 March, 1756. The Lords of Trade, more merciless than the savages and than the wilderness in winter, wished very much that every one of the Acadians should be driven out; and when it seemed that the work was done,
Niagara County (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
warriors in British pay, and to conduct an army of provincial militia and Indians against Crown Point; Shirley proposed to win laurels by driving the French from Niagara; while the commander-in-chief himself was to recover the Ohio Valley and the Northwest. Soon after Braddock sailed from Europe, the French also sent a fleet wiings of his successes by an express in June. At Fredericktown, where he halted for carriages, he said to Franklin, After taking Fort Duquesne, I am to proceed to Niagara, and, having taken that, to Frontenac. Duquesne can hardly detain me above three or four days, and then I see nothing that can obstruct my march to Niagara. TheNiagara. The Indians are dexterous in laying and executing ambuscades, replied Franklin, who remembered the French invasion of the Chickasaws, and the death of Artaguette and Vincennes. The savages, answered Braddock, may be formidable to your raw American militia; upon the king's regulars and disciplined troops it is impossible they should m
Annapolis (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ons, the treaty of Utrecht conceded Acadia, or Nova Scotia, to Great Britain. Yet the name of Annapolis, the presence of a feeble English garrison, and the emigration of hardly five or six English f were settled among themselves, with scarcely an instance of an appeal to English authority at Annapolis. The pastures were covered with their herds and flocks; and dikes, raised by extraordinary efe, but sufficient clothing. The few foreign luxuries that were coveted could be obtained from Annapolis or Louisburg, in return for furs, or wheat, or cattle. Thus were the Acadians happy in theiildren, in hopes I would not send off their husbands without them. Their hope was vain. Near Annapolis, a hundred heads of families fled to the woods, and a party was detached on the hunt to bring wanderers sighed for their native country; but, to prevent their return, their villages, from Annapolis to the isthmus, were laid waste. Their old homes were but ruins. In the district of Minas, f
Quebec (Canada) (search for this): chapter 8
British, but were not intercepted; and, before June was gone, Dieskau and his troops, with De Vaudreuil, who superseded Duquesne as governor of Canada, landed at Quebec, Vaudreuil was a Canadian by birth, had served in Canada, and been governor of Louisiana. The Canadians flocked about him to bid him welcome. From Williamsburr to go alone? I am sure we shall conquer; and, sharing his confidence, they pledged themselves to be his companions. Relation depuis le Depart des Troupes du Quebec, jusqu'au 30 Sept. 1755. At an early hour, Contrecoeur, the commandant at Fort Duquesne, detached De Beaujeu, Dumas, and De Lignery, with less than two hundred anon this occasion, and if they can but find a pretext to kill them, they will. Did a prisoner seek to escape? He was shot down by the sentinel. Yet some fled to Quebec; more than three thousand had withdrawn to Miiramichi, and the region south of the Ristigouche; Petition of the French Acadians at Miramichi, presented to De V
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ount to near seven thousand persons. thousand of these banished people were driven on board ships, and scattered among the English colonies, from New Hampshire to Georgia;——one thousand and twenty to South Carolina alone. Governor Lyttleton to Sec. H. Fox, 16 June, 1796. They were cast ashore without resources; hating the poor-h orchards; the ocean broke over their neglected dikes, and desolated their meadows. Relentless misfortune pursued the exiles wherever they fled. Those sent to Georgia, drawn by a love for the spot where they were born as strong as that of the captive Jews, who wept by the side of the rivers of Babylon for their own temple and lov. Lyttleton of S. C. to Fox, 16 June, 1756. Gov. Lawrence, Circular, 1 July, 1756. See also Representations of the Board of Trade against Reynolds, Governor of Georgia. Those who dwelt on the St. John's were torn once more from their new homes. Gov. Lawrence to Lords of Trade, 11 May, 1760. When Canada surrendered, hatred wi
Boscawen, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
g the French from Niagara; while the commander-in-chief himself was to recover the Ohio Valley and the Northwest. Soon after Braddock sailed from Europe, the French also sent a fleet with reinforcements for Canada, under the veteran Dieskau. Boscawen, with English ships, pursued them, though England had avowed only the intention to resist encroachments on her territory; and when the French ambassador at London expressed some uneasiness on the occasion, he was assured that certainly the Engliletters arrived, leaving no doubt, that the shores of the Bay of Fundy were entirely in the possession of the British; Council holden at the Governor's House in Halifax, on Thursday the 15th July, 1755. and yet at a council, at which Viceral Boscawen and the Rear-Admiral Mostyn were chap. VIII.} 1755. present by invitation, Lieut. Governor Lawrence to Vice-Admiral Boscawen, and Rear-Admiral Mostyn, Halifax, 14 July, 1755. it was unanimously determined to send the French inhabitants out o
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 8
ed the covenant of peace, obtained a cession of lands, and was invited to erect Fort Prince George near the villages of Conasatchee and Keowee. At the North, New England was extending British dominion. Massachusetts cheerfully levied about seven thousand nine hundred men, or nearly one-fifth of the able-bodied men in the colonyrations. It was the oldest French colony in North America. There the Bretons had built their dwellings sixteen years before the Pilgrims reached the shores of New England. With the progress of the respective settlements, sectional jealousies and religious bigotry had renewed their warfare; the off- chap. VIII.} 1755. spring of by the side of the rivers of Babylon for their own temple and land, escaped to sea in boats, and went coasting from harbor to harbor; but when they had reached New England, just as they would have set sail for their native fields, they were stopped by orders from Nova Scotia. Gov. Lyttleton of S. C. to Fox, 16 June, 1756. Gov.
Newcastle (Canada) (search for this): chapter 8
The Dauphin, being a good sailer, scud safely for Louisburg. Nine more of the French chap. VIII.} 1755. squadron came in sight of the British, but were not intercepted; and, before June was gone, Dieskau and his troops, with De Vaudreuil, who superseded Duquesne as governor of Canada, landed at Quebec, Vaudreuil was a Canadian by birth, had served in Canada, and been governor of Louisiana. The Canadians flocked about him to bid him welcome. From Williamsburg, Braddock had promised Newcastle to be beyond the mountains of Alleghany by the end of April; at Alexandria, in April, he prepared the ministry for tidings of his successes by an express in June. At Fredericktown, where he halted for carriages, he said to Franklin, After taking Fort Duquesne, I am to proceed to Niagara, and, having taken that, to Frontenac. Duquesne can hardly detain me above three or four days, and then I see nothing that can obstruct my march to Niagara. The Indians are dexterous in laying and execut
Fredericktown (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
before June was gone, Dieskau and his troops, with De Vaudreuil, who superseded Duquesne as governor of Canada, landed at Quebec, Vaudreuil was a Canadian by birth, had served in Canada, and been governor of Louisiana. The Canadians flocked about him to bid him welcome. From Williamsburg, Braddock had promised Newcastle to be beyond the mountains of Alleghany by the end of April; at Alexandria, in April, he prepared the ministry for tidings of his successes by an express in June. At Fredericktown, where he halted for carriages, he said to Franklin, After taking Fort Duquesne, I am to proceed to Niagara, and, having taken that, to Frontenac. Duquesne can hardly detain me above three or four days, and then I see nothing that can obstruct my march to Niagara. The Indians are dexterous in laying and executing ambuscades, replied Franklin, who remembered the French invasion of the Chickasaws, and the death of Artaguette and Vincennes. The savages, answered Braddock, may be formidab
St. Clair, Mich. (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
zling uniform, their burnished arms gleaming in the bright summer's sun, but sick at heart, and enfeebled by toil and unwholesome diet. At noon they forded the Monongahela again, and stood between the rivers that form the Ohio, only ten miles distant from their junction. A detachment of three hundred and fifty men, led by Lieutenant-Colonel Thomas Gage, Gage to Albemarle, 24 July, 1755, in Keppel's Keppel, i. 213. and closely attended by a working party of two hundred and fifty, under St. Clair, advanced cautiously, with guides and flanking parties, along a path but twelve feet wide, towards the uneven woody country that was between them and Fort Duquesne. Journal of General Braddock's Expedition, in British Museum, King's Lib. vol. 212. The general was following with the columns of artillery, baggage, and the main body of the army, when a very heavy and quick fire was heard in the front. Aware of Braddock's progress by the fidelity of their scouts, the French had resolved
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