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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition.. Search the whole document.

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Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
, being a good sailer, scud safely for Louisburg. Nine more of the French chap. VIII.} 1755. squadron came in sight of the British, but were not intercepted; and, before June was gone, Dieskau and his troops, with De Vaudreuil, who superseded Duquesne as governor of Canada, landed at Quebec, Vaudreuil was a Canadian by birth, had served in Canada, and been governor of Louisiana. The Canadians flocked about him to bid him welcome. From Williamsburg, Braddock had promised Newcastle to be bel, he prepared the ministry for tidings of his successes by an express in June. At Fredericktown, where he halted for carriages, he said to Franklin, After taking Fort Duquesne, I am to proceed to Niagara, and, having taken that, to Frontenac. Duquesne can hardly detain me above three or four days, and then I see nothing that can obstruct my march to Niagara. The Indians are dexterous in laying and executing ambuscades, replied Franklin, who remembered the French invasion of the Chickasaws, a
Portersville (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
imous thanks from the Assembly of his province. Franklin to Shirley, 22 May, 1755. Braddock to Secretary of State, 5 June, 1755. Votes of Pennsylvania Assembly, v., 397. Among the wagoners was Daniel Morgan, famed in village chap. VIII.} 1755. groups as a wrestler; skilful in the use of the musket; who emigrated, as a day-laborer, from New Jersey to Virginia, and husbanded his wages so that he had been able to become the owner of a team; all unconscious of his future greatness. At Will's Creek, which took the name of Cumberland, Washington, in May, joined the expedition as one of the generals aids. Seven-and-twenty days passed in the march of the army from Alexandria to Cumberland, where, at last, two thousand effective men were assembled; among them, two independent companies from New York, under the command of Horatio Gates. The American troops, wrote Braddock, have little courage, or good-will. I expect from them almost no military service, though I have employed the be
Halifax (Canada) (search for this): chapter 8
xandria. Lawrence, the lieutenanternor of Nova Scotia, was to reduce that province chap. VIII.} he really loved the whistling of bullets. Halifax to Sir Charles Hardy 31 March, 1756. The Virg When England began vigorously to colonize Nova Scotia, the native inhabitants might fear the lossfor the payment. Haliburton's History of Nova Scotia, i. 169. The order may still be read on the Council records at Halifax. They must comply, it was written, without making any terms, immediate their lands. Consult the Chief Justice of Nova Scotia upon that point; his opinion may serve as ato the removal of the French Inhabitants in Nova Scotia, 28 July, 1755. That the cruelty might Council holden at the Governor's House in Halifax, on Thursday the 15th July, 1755. and yet at ce-Admiral Boscawen, and Rear-Admiral Mostyn, Halifax, 14 July, 1755. it was unanimously determined Council holden at the Governor's House in Halifax, on Monday the 28th July, 1755. To hunt t[7 more...]
Louisburg (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
was as brave as he was taciturn, obeyed the order promptly; and the Alcide and Lys yielded to superior force. The Dauphin, being a good sailer, scud safely for Louisburg. Nine more of the French chap. VIII.} 1755. squadron came in sight of the British, but were not intercepted; and, before June was gone, Dieskau and his troops,ir own fields, of fleeces from their own flocks, coarse, but sufficient clothing. The few foreign luxuries that were coveted could be obtained from Annapolis or Louisburg, in return for furs, or wheat, or cattle. Thus were the Acadians happy in their neutrality and in the abundance which they drew from their native land. They four days it surrendered. Lieutenant-Governor Lawrence to the Lords of Trade, 28 June, 1755. By the terms of the capitulation, the garrison was to be sent to Louisburg; for the Acadian fugitives, inasmuch as they had been forced into the service, amnesty was stipulated. The place received an English garrison, and, from the bro
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
nd Sharpe. Lt. Gov. Sharpe to Shirley, 24 August, 1755. The months that followed were months of sorrow. Happily, the Catawbas at the South remained faithful; and in July, at a council of five hundred Cherokees assembled under a tree in the highlands of Western Carolina, Glen renewed the covenant of peace, obtained a cession of lands, and was invited to erect Fort Prince George near the villages of Conasatchee and Keowee. At the North, New England was extending British dominion. Massachusetts cheerfully levied about seven thousand nine hundred men, or nearly one-fifth of the able-bodied men in the colony. Of these, a detachment took part in establishing the sovereignty of England in Acadia. That peninsular region—abounding in harbors and in forests; rich in its ocean fisheries and in the product of its rivers; near to a continent that invited to the chase and the fur-trade; having, in its interior, large tracts of alluvial soil—had become dear to its inhabitants, who beheld
Williamsburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
and Lys yielded to superior force. The Dauphin, being a good sailer, scud safely for Louisburg. Nine more of the French chap. VIII.} 1755. squadron came in sight of the British, but were not intercepted; and, before June was gone, Dieskau and his troops, with De Vaudreuil, who superseded Duquesne as governor of Canada, landed at Quebec, Vaudreuil was a Canadian by birth, had served in Canada, and been governor of Louisiana. The Canadians flocked about him to bid him welcome. From Williamsburg, Braddock had promised Newcastle to be beyond the mountains of Alleghany by the end of April; at Alexandria, in April, he prepared the ministry for tidings of his successes by an express in June. At Fredericktown, where he halted for carriages, he said to Franklin, After taking Fort Duquesne, I am to proceed to Niagara, and, having taken that, to Frontenac. Duquesne can hardly detain me above three or four days, and then I see nothing that can obstruct my march to Niagara. The Indians
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
Trade to the King, 20 December, 1756. The resolution being carried into effectual execution by transporting the said French inhabitants to the amount of near seven thousand persons, &c. Compare Lieut. Governor Lawrence's circular to the Governors in America, 11 August, 1755. Their numbers amount to near seven thousand persons. thousand of these banished people were driven on board ships, and scattered among the English colonies, from New Hampshire to Georgia;——one thousand and twenty to South Carolina alone. Governor Lyttleton to Sec. H. Fox, 16 June, 1796. They were cast ashore without resources; hating the poor-house as a shelter for their offspring, and abhorring the thought of selling themselves as laborers. Households, too, were separated; the colonial newspapers contained advertise- chap VIII.} 1755 ments of members of families seeking their companions, of sons anxious to reach and relieve their parents, of mothers mourning for their children. The wanderers sighed for t
Trajectum (Netherlands) (search for this): chapter 8
of their church among the villages of the Abenakis. At last, after repeated conquests and restorations, the treaty of Utrecht conceded Acadia, or Nova Scotia, to Great Britain. Yet the name of Annapolis, the presence of a feeble English garrisonstandard or renounce its name. Though conquered, they were French neutrals. For nearly forty years from the peace of Utrecht they had been forgotten or neglected, and had prospered in their seclusion. No tax-gatherer counted their folds, no mag August, 1754. The Lords of Trade in reply veiled their wishes under the decorous form of suggestions. By the treaty of Utrecht, said they of the French Acadians, their becoming subjects of Great Britain is made an express condition of their contind; they stood in the way of the progress of the settlement; by their non-compliance with the conditions of the treaty of Utrecht, they had forfeited their possessions to the crown; after the departure of the fleet and troops the province would not b
Minas (Cuba) (search for this): chapter 8
ek shelter in Canada, or convey provisions to the French garrisons, they were directed to surrender their boats and their firearms; Memorials of the Deputies of Minas and Pisiquid, delivered to Captain Murray, 10 June, 1755. and, conscious of innocence, they gave up their barges and their muskets, leaving themselves without the efused them the liberty of transmigration. Proposition of the French Ambassador to the British Secretary of State, May, 1755, and answer. The inhabitants of Minas and the adjacent country pleaded with the British officers for the restitution of their boats and their guns, promising fidelity, if they could but retain their li native country; but, to prevent their return, their villages, from Annapolis to the isthmus, were laid waste. Their old homes were but ruins. In the district of Minas, for instance, two hundred and fifty of their houses, and more than as many barns, were consumed. The live stock which belonged to them, consisting of great numbe
Mohawk (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 8
England and France peace existed under ratified treaties; it was proposed not to invade Canada, but only to repel encroachments on the frontier from the Ohio to the Gulf of St. Lawrence. For this end, four expeditions were concerted by Braddock at Alexandria. Lawrence, the lieutenanternor of Nova Scotia, was to reduce that province chap. VIII.} 1755. according to the English interpretation of its boundaries; Johnson, from his long acquaintance with the Six Nations, was selected to enroll Mohawk warriors in British pay, and to conduct an army of provincial militia and Indians against Crown Point; Shirley proposed to win laurels by driving the French from Niagara; while the commander-in-chief himself was to recover the Ohio Valley and the Northwest. Soon after Braddock sailed from Europe, the French also sent a fleet with reinforcements for Canada, under the veteran Dieskau. Boscawen, with English ships, pursued them, though England had avowed only the intention to resist encroac
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