hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
William Pitt 341 3 Browse Search
France (France) 298 0 Browse Search
Canada (Canada) 166 0 Browse Search
Halifax (Canada) 152 0 Browse Search
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) 152 0 Browse Search
New Castle, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) 138 0 Browse Search
Bute 134 0 Browse Search
New England (United States) 120 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 120 0 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 120 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition.. Search the whole document.

Found 528 total hits in 148 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
bury Williams, 11 April, 1755. Von Raumer's Beytrage, II. 286. by the British ministry to the British ambassador of that day, seize the opportunity to convince the Russians, that they will remain only an Asiatic power, if they allow the king of Prussia to carry through his plans of aggrandizement; and full authority was given to effect an alliance with Russia to overawe Prussia, and control the politics of Germany. Yet at that time Frederic manifested no purpose of making conquests. In thiPrussia, and control the politics of Germany. Yet at that time Frederic manifested no purpose of making conquests. In this manner a treaty was concluded by which England, on the point of incurring the hostility of the Catholic princes, bound itself to pay to Russia at least half a million of dollars annually, and contingently two and a half million of dollars, in order to balance and paralyze the influence of the only considerable protestant monarchy on the continent. The English king was so eagerly bent on this shameful negotiation, that Bestuchef, the Russian minister, obtained a gratuity of fifty thousand dol
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
At the head of the American forces this ministry had placed Shirley, a worn-out barrister, who knew nothing of war. In the security of a congress of governors at New York, he in December planned a splendid campaign for the following year. Quebec was to be menaced by way of the Kennebec and the Chaudiere; Frontenac and Toronto and Niagara were to be taken; and then Fort. Duquesne and Detroit and Michilimackinac, deprived of their communications, were of course to surrender. Sharpe, of Maryland, thought all efforts vain, unless parliament should interfere; and this opinion he enforced in many letters to his correspondents. See the Correspondence of Sharpe with his brother in England, and his colleagues in America. His colleagues and the officers of the army were equally importunate. If 1756 they expect success at home, wrote Gage, in January, 1756, echoing the common opinion of those around him, acts of parliament must be made to tax the chap. IX.} 1756. provinces, in propo
Fort William (Canada) (search for this): chapter 9
war with France seemed a war for Protestantism and freedom. But Johnson knew not how to profit by success; with a busy air, he kept the men all day on their arms, and at night, half of the whole were on guard. Shirley and the New England provinces, and his own council of war, urged him to advance; but while the ever active French took post at Ticonderoga, as Duquesne had advised, he loitered away the autumn, expecting very shortly a more formidable attack with artillery, and building Fort William chap. IX.} 1755. Henry, a useless fort of wood near Lake George. When winter approached, he left six hundred men as a garrison, and dismissed the New England militia to their firesides. Of the enterprise against Western New York Shirley assumed the conduct. The fort at Niagara was but a house, almost in ruins, surrounded by a small ditch and a rotten palisade of seven or eight feet high. The garrison was but of thirty men, most of them scarcely provided with muskets. There Shirley
Braddock (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
garrison, and dismissed the New England militia to their firesides. Of the enterprise against Western New York Shirley assumed the conduct. The fort at Niagara was but a house, almost in ruins, surrounded by a small ditch and a rotten palisade of seven or eight feet high. The garrison was but of thirty men, most of them scarcely provided with muskets. There Shirley, with an effective force of little less than two thousand men, was to welcome the victor of the Ohio. But the news of Braddock's defeat overtook and disheartened the party. The boatmen on the Mohawk were intractable; at the carrying place there were not sledges enough to bear the military stores over the morasses. On the twenty-first of August, Shirley reached Oswego. Weeks passed in building boats; on the eighteenth of September, six hundred men were to embark on Lake Ontario, when a storm prevented; afterwards head winds raged; then a tempest made navigation difficult; then sickness prevailed; then the Indians
Russian River (Alaska, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ot the respect of parliament; at variance with the people of England and with the colonies; beaten from the Ohio valley, and in Europe squandering English money to engage armies which were to be used only against England and her allies. The treaty was hardly concluded, before the ministry yielded to the impulse given by Pitt; and, after subsidizing Russia to obtain the use of the Russian troops against Frederic, it negotiated an alliance with Frederic himself, not to permit the entrance of Russian or any other foreign troops into Germany. At the head of the American forces this ministry had placed Shirley, a worn-out barrister, who knew nothing of war. In the security of a congress of governors at New York, he in December planned a splendid campaign for the following year. Quebec was to be menaced by way of the Kennebec and the Chaudiere; Frontenac and Toronto and Niagara were to be taken; and then Fort. Duquesne and Detroit and Michilimackinac, deprived of their communications,
Oswego (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
The enemy was more adventurous. Boldness wins, was Dieskau's maxim. Doreil to the Minister, 28 Oct. 1755. Abandoning the well-concerted plan of an attack on Oswego, Vaudreuil to the Minister, 24 July, 1755. Vaudreuil sent him to oppose the army of Johnson. For the defence of the crumbling fortress at Crown Point, seven hre intractable; at the carrying place there were not sledges enough to bear the military stores over the morasses. On the twenty-first of August, Shirley reached Oswego. Weeks passed in building boats; on the eighteenth of September, six hundred men were to embark on Lake Ontario, when a storm prevented; afterwards head winds rarevailed; then the Indians deserted; and then the season gave him an excuse for retreating. So, on the twenty-fourth of October, having constructed a new fort at Oswego, and placed Mercer in command, with a garrison of seven hundred men, he left the borders of Lake Ontario. At this time a paper by Franklin, published in Boston
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
mbled at Albany. The army with which Johnson was to reduce Crown Point consisted of New England militia, chiefly from Connecticut and Massachusetts. A regiment of five hundred foresters of New Hampshire were raising a fort in Coos, on the Connectieve Fort Edward. Among chap. IX.} 1755. them was Israel Putnam, to whom, at the age of thirty-seven, the Assembly at Connecticut had just given the rank of a second lieutenant. Records at Hartford for 29 Geo. II. Putnam's commission as 2nd Lieut. in the 6th company of the 3rd Regiment of Connecticut, forwarded not before September 2, reached him after the battle. Two hundred warriors of the Six Nations went also, led by Hendrick, the gray-haired chieftain, famed for his clear voice and f in proportion to their efforts. Of this sum fifty-four thousand pounds fell to Massachusetts, twenty-six thousand to Connecticut, fifteen thousand to New York. Lords of Trade to Lords of the Treasury, 12 Feb., 1756; and to Secretary of State, 1
Alleghany Mountains (United States) (search for this): chapter 9
icer in the colonies. His opinion carried great weight, and it became, henceforward, a firm persuasion among the Lords of Trade, especially Halifax, Soame Jenyns, and Rigby, as well as with all who busied themselves with schemes of government for America, that the British parliament must take upon itself the establishment and collection of an American revenue. While the officers of the Crown were thus conspiring against American liberty, the tomahawk was uplifted along the ranges of the Alleghanies. The governor of Virginia Dinwiddie to Lords of Trade, 6 September, 1755. pressed upon Washington the rank of colonel and the command of the volunteer companies which were to guard its frontier, from Cumberland, through the whole valley of the Shenandoah. Difficulties of all kinds gathered in his path. The humblest captain that held a royal commission claimed to be his superior; and, for the pur- chap. IX.} 1756. pose of a personal appeal to Shirley, Dinwiddie to Shirley, 175
Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
sy air, he kept the men all day on their arms, and at night, half of the whole were on guard. Shirley and the New England provinces, and his own council of war, urged him to advance; but while the ever active French took post at Ticonderoga, as Duquesne had advised, he loitered away the autumn, expecting very shortly a more formidable attack with artillery, and building Fort William chap. IX.} 1755. Henry, a useless fort of wood near Lake George. When winter approached, he left six hundred mty of a congress of governors at New York, he in December planned a splendid campaign for the following year. Quebec was to be menaced by way of the Kennebec and the Chaudiere; Frontenac and Toronto and Niagara were to be taken; and then Fort. Duquesne and Detroit and Michilimackinac, deprived of their communications, were of course to surrender. Sharpe, of Maryland, thought all efforts vain, unless parliament should interfere; and this opinion he enforced in many letters to his correspondent
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ch Johnson was to reduce Crown Point consisted of New England militia, chiefly from Connecticut and Massachusetnister, 13 August, 1755. Early in August, the New England men, having Phinehas Lyman for their major-generaith the wagons and baggage some protection to the New England militia, whose arms were but their fowling-piecese beginning of the action, and for five hours the New England people, under their own officers, good marksmen ae victory, which was due to the enthusiasm of the New England men. Our all, they cried, depends on the success half of the whole were on guard. Shirley and the New England provinces, and his own council of war, urged him six hundred men as a garrison, and dismissed the New England militia to their firesides. Of the enterprise f John Adams, chap. IX.} 1755 while teacher of a New England free school. Within twenty-one years he shall as years, said one, who, after a long settlement in New England, had just returned home, the colonies of America
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...