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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition.. Search the whole document.

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West Indies (search for this): chapter 9
favored American taxation by act of parliament; none scrupled as to the power; but the unfit Lyttelton, then chancellor of the exchequer, chap. IX.} 1756. though fixed in his opinions, could not mature schemes of finance; and the British statutes, 29 Geo. II., c. XXVI.; 31 Geo. II., c. XXXVI., ยง 8; 1 Geo. III., c. IV. which manifest the settled purpose Letter of Bollan to Massachusetts, in May, 1756. of raising a revenue out of the traffic between the American continent and the West India Islands, show that the execution of that purpose was at that session, and twice afterwards, deferred to a quieter period. Still parliament, in the session of 1756, extended its authority signally over America. There foreign Protestants might be employed as engineers and officers to enlist a regiment of aliens. 29 Geo. II., c. v. Indented servants might be accepted, and their masters were referred for compensation to the respective assemblies; 29 Geo. II., c. XXXV. and the naval code
Fort Bedford (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
e from the Board of Trade, a permanent army was established in America. Nothing seemed wanting but an act of parliament for an American revenue. The obstinacy of Pennsylvania was pleaded as requiring it. Garth's Report of the Debate in the House of Commons, Feb. 3, 1766. On the questions affecting that province, the Board of Trade listened to Charles Yorke on the side of prerogative, while Charles Pratt spoke for colonial liberty; and after a long hearing, Halifax and Soame Jenyns, and Bedford's dependent, Richard Rigby, and Talbot joined in advising an immediate act of the British legislature to overrule the charter of the colony. But the ministry was rent by factions, and their fluctuating tenure of office made it difficult to mature novel or daring measures of legislation. There existed no central will, that could conquer Canada, or subvert the liberties of America. A majority of the Treasury Board, as well as the Board of Trade, favored American taxation by act of parlia
Loudoun (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
as viceroy; but he declined the post before the arrangements were completed. The plan was now to be partially carried into effect. On the instance of Cumberland and Fox, Shirley was superseded and ordered to return to England, and the Earl of Loudoun, a friend of Halifax, passionately zealous for the subordination and inferiority of the colonies, was appointed commander-in-chief of the army throughout the British continental provinces in America. His dignity was enhanced by his appointment ax as the most daring violation of the royal prerogative. Each northern province also was forbidden to negotiate with the Indians; and their renations were intrusted solely to Sir William Johnson, chap. IX.} 1756. with no subordination but to Loudoun. Yet all could not prevail. In a few years, said one, who, after a long settlement in New England, had just returned home, the colonies of America will be independent of Britain; and at least one voice was raised to advise the sending out of
Robert Dinwiddie (search for this): chapter 9
it for us, than we can ourselves. Sir Charles Hardy to the Lords of Trade, January, 1756. From the Old Dominion, Dinwiddie continued to urge a general land-tax and poll-tax for all the colonies. Our people, said he, will be inflamed, if theye unsuccessful. These dominions, if properly protected, will be the Western and best empire in the world. Lieutenant-Governor Dinwiddie to Secretary Fox, 1756. With more elaborateness and authority, Shirley, Shirley to Lords of Trade, 5 Jg against American liberty, the tomahawk was uplifted along the ranges of the Alleghanies. The governor of Virginia Dinwiddie to Lords of Trade, 6 September, 1755. pressed upon Washington the rank of colonel and the command of the volunteer compal commission claimed to be his superior; and, for the pur- chap. IX.} 1756. pose of a personal appeal to Shirley, Dinwiddie to Shirley, 1756. he made a winter's journey to Boston. How different was to be his next entry into that town! Shirle
e; and their commerce was mutually protected by the sanctity of treaties. Of a sudden, hostile orders were issued to all British vessels of war to take all French vessels, private as well as public; and, without warning, ships from the French colonies, the ships bound from Martinico to Marseilles, freighted with the rich products of plantations tilled by the slaves of the Jesuits, De Tocqueville: Histoire Philosophique du regne de Louis XV. II. 287. the fishing-smacks in which the humble Breton mariners ventured to Newfoundland, whale-ships returning from their adventures, the scanty fortunes with which poor men freighted the little barks engaged in the coasting trade, were within one month, by violence and by cowardly artifices, seized by the British marine, and carried into English ports. What has taken place, wrote Rouille, under the eye of Louis the Fifteenth, is nothing but a system of piracy on a grand scale, unworthy of a civilized people. In time of full peace, merchant-s
Phinehas Lyman (search for this): chapter 9
a lieutenant, of a rugged nature, but of the coolest judgment; skilled at discovering the paths of the wilderness, and knowing the way to the hearts of the backwoodsmen. The French, on the other hand, called every able-bodied man in the district of Montreal into active service for the defence of Crown Point, so that reapers had to be sent up from Three Rivers and Quebec to gather in the harvest. Breard to the Minister, 13 August, 1755. Early in August, the New England men, having Phinehas Lyman for their major-general, were finishing Fort Edward, at the portage between the Hudson chap. IX.} 1755. and the headsprings of the Sorel. The forests were never free from secret danger; American scalps were sought for by the wakeful savage, to be strung together for the adornment of the wigwam. Towards the end of August, the untrained forces, which, with Indians, amounted to thirty-four hundred men, were conducted by William Johnson across the portage of twelve miles, to the southern
Hardwicke (search for this): chapter 9
Cumberland and Fox, Shirley was superseded and ordered to return to England, and the Earl of Loudoun, a friend of Halifax, passionately zealous for the subordination and inferiority of the colonies, was appointed commander-in-chief of the army throughout the British continental provinces in America. His dignity was enhanced by his appointment as governor of the central, ancient, and populous dominion of Virginia. This commission, which was prepared by the chancel- chap. IX.} 1756. lor, Hardwicke, established a military power throughout the continent, independent of the colonial governors, and superior to them. They in right of their office might claim to be the civil and military representatives of the king; yet they could not give the word within their own respective provinces except in the absence of the continental commander and his representatives; See the Commission and Instructions. and this commission, so contrary to the spirit of the British constitution, was renewed s
Ephraim Williams (search for this): chapter 9
night following the seventh of September, it was told in the camp at Lake George, that a large party of men had landed at the head of South Bay, and were travelling from Wood Creek to the Hudson. On the next morning, after a council of war, Ephraim Williams, a Massachusetts colonel, the same who, in passing through Albany, had made a bequest of his estate by will to found a free school, was sent with a thousand men to relieve Fort Edward. Among chap. IX.} 1755. them was Israel Putnam, to whorty were entirely within the ambush, the French Indians showed themselves to the Mohawks, but without firing on their kindred, leaving the Abenakis and Canadians to make the attack. Hendrick, who alone was on horseback, was killed on the spot. Williams also fell; but Nathan Whiting, of New Haven, conducted the retreat in good order, often rallying and turning to fire. The camp had still no intrenchments. When the noise of musketry was heard, two or three cannon were hastily brought up from
Worcester (search for this): chapter 9
us from setting up for ourselves is to disunite us. Letter of John Adams, 12 October, 1755. I quote from the original letter, which the late John Quincy Adams had the goodness to leave with me for a time, together with other most interesting manuscripts. Such were the dreams of John Adams, chap. IX.} 1755 while teacher of a New England free school. Within twenty-one years he shall assist in declaring his country's independence; in less than thirty, this master of the town school of Worcester, after a career of danger and effort, shall stand before the king of Great Britain, the acknowledged Envoy of the free and United States of America. The military operations in America might be respectively explained as acts of defence, to be settled by an adjustment of boundaries. The capture of the Alcide and the Lys by Boscawen, known in London on the fifteenth of July, Memoire contenant le Precis des Faits, 54, 55. was an act of open hostility, and it was considered what instruct
New York Shirley (search for this): chapter 9
des. Of the enterprise against Western New York Shirley assumed the conduct. The fort at Niagarathe morasses. On the twenty-first of August, Shirley reached Oswego. Weeks passed in building boat inquiry chap. IX.} 1755. I can make, wrote Shirley, I have found the calcunations right. The nuon and separate existence. The topic which Shirley discussed with the ministry, engaged the thou the American forces this ministry had placed Shirley, a worn-out barrister, who knew nothing of wa6. With more elaborateness and authority, Shirley, Shirley to Lords of Trade, 5 January, 175Shirley to Lords of Trade, 5 January, 1756. by his military rank as commander-in-chief, taking precedence of all the governors, renewed his a personal appeal to Shirley, Dinwiddie to Shirley, 1756. he made a winter's journey to Boston. n! Shirley, who wished to make him second Shirley to Sharpe, 16 May, 1756. Halifax to Sir Charfect. On the instance of Cumberland and Fox, Shirley was superseded and ordered to return to Engla[8 more...]
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