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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition.. Search the whole document.

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United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 9
e late John Quincy Adams had the goodness to leave with me for a time, together with other most interesting manuscripts. Such were the dreams of John Adams, chap. IX.} 1755 while teacher of a New England free school. Within twenty-one years he shall assist in declaring his country's independence; in less than thirty, this master of the town school of Worcester, after a career of danger and effort, shall stand before the king of Great Britain, the acknowledged Envoy of the free and United States of America. The military operations in America might be respectively explained as acts of defence, to be settled by an adjustment of boundaries. The capture of the Alcide and the Lys by Boscawen, known in London on the fifteenth of July, Memoire contenant le Precis des Faits, 54, 55. was an act of open hostility, and it was considered what instructions should be given to the British marine. The princess, mother of George the Third, inveighed most bitterly against not pushing the French
Nova Scotia (Canada) (search for this): chapter 9
Chapter 9: Great Britain unites America under military rule Newcastle's administration continued. 1755-1756. while the British interpretation of the bounda- chap. IX.} 1755. ries of Acadia was made good by occupation, the troops for the central expeditions had assembled at Albany. The army with which Johnson was to reduce Crown Point consisted of New England militia, chiefly from Connecticut and Massachusetts. A regiment of five hundred foresters of New Hampshire were raising a fort in Coos, on the Connecticut; but, under a new summons, they made the long march through the pathless region to Albany. Among them was John Stark, then a lieutenant, of a rugged nature, but of the coolest judgment; skilled at discovering the paths of the wilderness, and knowing the way to the hearts of the backwoodsmen. The French, on the other hand, called every able-bodied man in the district of Montreal into active service for the defence of Crown Point, so that reapers had to be sent up
Halifax (Canada) (search for this): chapter 9
many years a crown officer in the colonies. His opinion carried great weight, and it became, henceforward, a firm persuasion among the Lords of Trade, especially Halifax, Soame Jenyns, and Rigby, as well as with all who busied themselves with schemes of government for America, that the British parliament must take upon itself the a winter's journey to Boston. How different was to be his next entry into that town! Shirley, who wished to make him second Shirley to Sharpe, 16 May, 1756. Halifax to Sir Charles Hardy, 31 March, 1756. in command in an expedition against Fort Duquesne, sustained his claim. Shirley to Sharpe, 5 March, 1756. When his author that province, the Board of Trade listened to Charles Yorke on the side of prerogative, while Charles Pratt spoke for colonial liberty; and after a long hearing, Halifax and Soame Jenyns, and Bedford's dependent, Richard Rigby, and Talbot joined in advising an immediate act of the British legislature to overrule the charter of the
Ticonderoga (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
your estate. And in all the villages the prayers of God's people went up, that they might be crowned with victory to the glory of God; for the war with France seemed a war for Protestantism and freedom. But Johnson knew not how to profit by success; with a busy air, he kept the men all day on their arms, and at night, half of the whole were on guard. Shirley and the New England provinces, and his own council of war, urged him to advance; but while the ever active French took post at Ticonderoga, as Duquesne had advised, he loitered away the autumn, expecting very shortly a more formidable attack with artillery, and building Fort William chap. IX.} 1755. Henry, a useless fort of wood near Lake George. When winter approached, he left six hundred men as a garrison, and dismissed the New England militia to their firesides. Of the enterprise against Western New York Shirley assumed the conduct. The fort at Niagara was but a house, almost in ruins, surrounded by a small ditch a
Newfoundland (Canada) (search for this): chapter 9
lly protected by the sanctity of treaties. Of a sudden, hostile orders were issued to all British vessels of war to take all French vessels, private as well as public; and, without warning, ships from the French colonies, the ships bound from Martinico to Marseilles, freighted with the rich products of plantations tilled by the slaves of the Jesuits, De Tocqueville: Histoire Philosophique du regne de Louis XV. II. 287. the fishing-smacks in which the humble Breton mariners ventured to Newfoundland, whale-ships returning from their adventures, the scanty fortunes with which poor men freighted the little barks engaged in the coasting trade, were within one month, by violence and by cowardly artifices, seized by the British marine, and carried into English ports. What has taken place, wrote Rouille, under the eye of Louis the Fifteenth, is nothing but a system of piracy on a grand scale, unworthy of a civilized people. In time of full peace, merchant-ships have been seized, to the v
Shenandoah Valley (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
a, that the British parliament must take upon itself the establishment and collection of an American revenue. While the officers of the Crown were thus conspiring against American liberty, the tomahawk was uplifted along the ranges of the Alleghanies. The governor of Virginia Dinwiddie to Lords of Trade, 6 September, 1755. pressed upon Washington the rank of colonel and the command of the volunteer companies which were to guard its frontier, from Cumberland, through the whole valley of the Shenandoah. Difficulties of all kinds gathered in his path. The humblest captain that held a royal commission claimed to be his superior; and, for the pur- chap. IX.} 1756. pose of a personal appeal to Shirley, Dinwiddie to Shirley, 1756. he made a winter's journey to Boston. How different was to be his next entry into that town! Shirley, who wished to make him second Shirley to Sharpe, 16 May, 1756. Halifax to Sir Charles Hardy, 31 March, 1756. in command in an expedition against
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
The army with which Johnson was to reduce Crown Point consisted of New England militia, chiefly from Connecticut and Massachusetts. A regiment of five hundred foresters of New Hampshire were raising a fort in Coos, on the Connecticut; but, under asiasm of the New England men. Our all, they cried, depends on the success of this expedition. Come, said Pomeroy, of Massachusetts, to his friends at home, come to the help of the Lord against the mighty; you that value our holy religion and our li thousand pounds were granted to them in proportion to their efforts. Of this sum fifty-four thousand pounds fell to Massachusetts, twenty-six thousand to Connecticut, fifteen thousand to New York. Lords of Trade to Lords of the Treasury, 12 Feb c. XXVI.; 31 Geo. II., c. XXXVI., ยง 8; 1 Geo. III., c. IV. which manifest the settled purpose Letter of Bollan to Massachusetts, in May, 1756. of raising a revenue out of the traffic between the American continent and the West India Islands, sho
Russia (Russia) (search for this): chapter 9
ministry knew not how to use the one or the other. They turned to Russia; and with as much blindness to the interests of their country, as if observation, and yet credulous and easily deceived, to introduce Russia as supervisor chap. IX.} 1755 of the affairs of Germany. Seize thandizement; and full authority was given to effect an alliance with Russia to overawe Prussia, and control the politics of Germany. Yet at thrring the hostility of the Catholic princes, bound itself to pay to Russia at least half a million of dollars annually, and contingently two a755. So venal were the princes of that day, that the aid of the Russian empire was for sale; and the empress herself in the market at fifty thfice of paymaster, declared his purpose of opposing the treaty with Russia. Newcastle sent for Pitt, offered him kind words from his sovereignistry yielded to the impulse given by Pitt; and, after subsidizing Russia to obtain the use of the Russian troops against Frederic, it negoti
York (Canada) (search for this): chapter 9
se of the Russian troops against Frederic, it negotiated an alliance with Frederic himself, not to permit the entrance of Russian or any other foreign troops into Germany. At the head of the American forces this ministry had placed Shirley, a worn-out barrister, who knew nothing of war. In the security of a congress of governors at New York, he in December planned a splendid campaign for the following year. Quebec was to be menaced by way of the Kennebec and the Chaudiere; Frontenac and Toronto and Niagara were to be taken; and then Fort. Duquesne and Detroit and Michilimackinac, deprived of their communications, were of course to surrender. Sharpe, of Maryland, thought all efforts vain, unless parliament should interfere; and this opinion he enforced in many letters to his correspondents. See the Correspondence of Sharpe with his brother in England, and his colleagues in America. His colleagues and the officers of the army were equally importunate. If 1756 they expect succ
Newcastle (Canada) (search for this): chapter 9
hed Hanover in the sea, as the cause of all misfortunes. Newcastle suggested trifles, to delay a decision. If we are convin It is vexing your neighbors for a little muck. I, said Newcastle, the prime minister, think some middle way may be found ouadron, it was replied, is but nine. I mean that, resumed Newcastle, of the merchantmen only. Thus he proceeded with inconcence of Han over, or if needed, of the British dominions. Newcastle was sure of his majority in the House of Commons; but Wildeclared his purpose of opposing the treaty with Russia. Newcastle sent for Pitt, offered him kind words from his sovereign,liberties of Germany and of Europe. Nervous from fright, Newcastle was disposed at once to resign power to Fox. You are not fit to be first minister, was the sneer of Granville; and Newcastle did not recover courage till in November Fox consented to to rely on but the corrupt influence of the aristocracy, Newcastle now sought to unite it, by a distribution of pensions and
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