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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition.. Search the whole document.

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New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ion, the troops for the central expeditions had assembled at Albany. The army with which Johnson was to reduce Crown Point consisted of New England militia, chiefly from Connecticut and Massachusetts. A regiment of five hundred foresters of New Hampshire were raising a fort in Coos, on the Connecticut; but, under a new summons, they made the long march through the pathless region to Albany. Among them was John Stark, then a lieutenant, of a rugged nature, but of the coolest judgment; skillednety-six were wounded; of the French the loss was not much greater. Towards chap. IX.} 1755. sunset, a party of three hundred French, who had rallied, and were retreating in a body, at two miles from the lake, were attacked by McGinnes, of New Hampshire, who, with two hundred men of that colony, was marching across the portage from Fort Edward. Panic-stricken by the well concerted movement, the enemy fled, leaving their baggage; but the brave McGinnes was mortally wounded. The disasters
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
ould offer myself a willing sacrifice to the butchering enemy. The interior settlements of Pennsylvania were exposed to the same calamities, and domestic faction impeded measures of defence. In thve one power established there. Walpole's Memoires of Geo. II., II., 8. The militia law of Pennsylvania, he said, was designed to be ineffectual. It offered no compulsion, and, moreover, gave the ng quarters upon the colonies by the authority of Murray. His opinion against the statute of Pennsylvania, which, in extending the act of parliament to punish mutiny, regulated the providing of quart. Nothing seemed wanting but an act of parliament for an American revenue. The obstinacy of Pennsylvania was pleaded as requiring it. Garth's Report of the Debate in the House of Commons, Feb. 3,lakes, great waters, or rivers of North America. 29 Geo. II., c. XXVII. The militia law of Pennsylvania was repealed by the king in council; the commissions of all officers elected under it were ca
North America (search for this): chapter 9
d assistance to each other for the future. The Board, in 1697, after considering with their utmost care, could only recommend the appointment of a captain-general of all the forces and all the militia of all the provinces on the continent of North America, with power to levy and command them for their defence, under such limitations and instructions as to his Majesty should seem best; to appoint officers to train the inhabitants; from the Quakers to receive in money chap. IX.} 1756. their shccepted, and their masters were referred for compensation to the respective assemblies; 29 Geo. II., c. XXXV. and the naval code of England was extended to all persons employed in the king's service on the lakes, great waters, or rivers of North America. 29 Geo. II., c. XXVII. The militia law of Pennsylvania was repealed by the king in council; the commissions of all officers elected under it were cancelled; the companies themselves were broken up and dispersed. And while volunteers were
Lake George, Fla. (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
r fort erected here before; Johnson to Lords of Trade, 8 Sept. 1755. and naming the waters Lake George, he cleared space for a camp of five thousand men. The lake protects him on the north; his flute; and, as evening came on, the party found itself four miles from the fort, on the road to Lake George. The red men, who never obey implicitly, but insist upon deliberating with the commander andnchments. Late in the night following the seventh of September, it was told in the camp at Lake George, that a large party of men had landed at the head of South Bay, and were travelling from Woodith artillery, and building Fort William chap. IX.} 1755. Henry, a useless fort of wood near Lake George. When winter approached, he left six hundred men as a garrison, and dismissed the New Englanablishment of a perpetual revenue for the present. The northern colonies, whose successes at Lake George had mitigated the disgraces of the previous year, were encouraged by a remuneration; and, as
Niagara County (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
less fort of wood near Lake George. When winter approached, he left six hundred men as a garrison, and dismissed the New England militia to their firesides. Of the enterprise against Western New York Shirley assumed the conduct. The fort at Niagara was but a house, almost in ruins, surrounded by a small ditch and a rotten palisade of seven or eight feet high. The garrison was but of thirty men, most of them scarcely provided with muskets. There Shirley, with an effective force of little er, who knew nothing of war. In the security of a congress of governors at New York, he in December planned a splendid campaign for the following year. Quebec was to be menaced by way of the Kennebec and the Chaudiere; Frontenac and Toronto and Niagara were to be taken; and then Fort. Duquesne and Detroit and Michilimackinac, deprived of their communications, were of course to surrender. Sharpe, of Maryland, thought all efforts vain, unless parliament should interfere; and this opinion he en
Quebec (Canada) (search for this): chapter 9
lled every able-bodied man in the district of Montreal into active service for the defence of Crown Point, so that reapers had to be sent up from Three Rivers and Quebec to gather in the harvest. Breard to the Minister, 13 August, 1755. Early in August, the New England men, having Phinehas Lyman for their major-general, wery fired at the unhappy man, and wounded him incurably. Brief was the American career of the fearless Dieskau. In June his eye had first rested on the cliff of Quebec; he had sailed proudly up the stream which was the glory of Canada; had made his way to the highland sources of the Sorel; and now, mangled and helpless, lay a prut barrister, who knew nothing of war. In the security of a congress of governors at New York, he in December planned a splendid campaign for the following year. Quebec was to be menaced by way of the Kennebec and the Chaudiere; Frontenac and Toronto and Niagara were to be taken; and then Fort. Duquesne and Detroit and Michilima
Worcester (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
of the Assemblies for their subsistence, and commonly vigilant, to prevent any step of that kind from being chap. IX.} 1755. taken. Thus was the jealousy of the British government excited, and thus was it soothed. Little was it foreseen, that the measures proposed to secure the colonies, were to be the means of effecting their union and separate existence. The topic which Shirley discussed with the ministry, engaged the thoughts of the Americans, who saw visions of coming glory. At Worcester, a thriving village, of about a thousand people, or perhaps less, the whole town was immersed in politics. The interests of nations and the horrors of war made the subject of every conversation. The master of the town school, where the highest wages were sixty dollars for the season, a young man of hardly twenty, just from Harvard College, and at that time meditating to become a preacher, would sit and hear, and, escaping from a maze of observations, would sometimes retire, and, by layin
St. Petersburg (Russia) (search for this): chapter 9
their strength on the ocean, were almost unanimous for engaging in war. But its successful conduct seemed to require united activity in America and allies in Europe. Corruption and force are the instruments of feebleness; the incompetent ministry knew not how to use the one or the other. They turned to Russia; and with as much blindness to the interests of their country, as indifference to every thing but the possession of place, they instructed Sir Hanbury Williams, the new envoy at St. Petersburg, a diplomatist boastful of his powers of observation, and yet credulous and easily deceived, to introduce Russia as supervisor chap. IX.} 1755 of the affairs of Germany. Seize the opportunity, such was the substance of the instructions given Instructions from Lord Holdernesse to Sir Hanbury Williams, 11 April, 1755. Von Raumer's Beytrage, II. 286. by the British ministry to the British ambassador of that day, seize the opportunity to convince the Russians, that they will remain on
Fort Edward (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 9
August, 1755. Early in August, the New England men, having Phinehas Lyman for their major-general, were finishing Fort Edward, at the portage between the Hudson chap. IX.} 1755. and the headsprings of the Sorel. The forests were never free frs, ascended Lake Champlain to its head, and, after a three days march, designed, at nightfall on the fourth, to attack Fort Edward. The guides took a false route; and, as evening came on, the party found itself four miles from the fort, on the roadough Albany, had made a bequest of his estate by will to found a free school, was sent with a thousand men to relieve Fort Edward. Among chap. IX.} 1755. them was Israel Putnam, to whom, at the age of thirty-seven, the Assembly at Connecticut hadattacked by McGinnes, of New Hampshire, who, with two hundred men of that colony, was marching across the portage from Fort Edward. Panic-stricken by the well concerted movement, the enemy fled, leaving their baggage; but the brave McGinnes was mor
Lake Ontario (search for this): chapter 9
rying place there were not sledges enough to bear the military stores over the morasses. On the twenty-first of August, Shirley reached Oswego. Weeks passed in building boats; on the eighteenth of September, six hundred men were to embark on Lake Ontario, when a storm prevented; afterwards head winds raged; then a tempest made navigation difficult; then sickness prevailed; then the Indians deserted; and then the season gave him an excuse for retreating. So, on the twenty-fourth of October, having constructed a new fort at Oswego, and placed Mercer in command, with a garrison of seven hundred men, he left the borders of Lake Ontario. At this time a paper by Franklin, published in Boston, and reprinted in London, had drawn the attention of all observers to the rapid increase of the population in the colonies. Paper annexed to William Clarke's Observations on the late and present conduct of the French, 1755. Upon the best inquiry chap. IX.} 1755. I can make, wrote Shirley, I ha
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