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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition.. Search the whole document.

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Newcastle (search for this): chapter 9
. II., II., 8. The militia law of Pennsylvania, he said, was designed to be ineffectual. It offered no compulsion, and, moreover, gave the nomination of officers to the people. The administration hearkened to a scheme for dissolving the Assembly of that province by act of parliament, and disfranchising the Quakers for a limited time, till laws for armed defence and for diminishing the power of the people could be framed by others. After the long councils of indecision, the ministry of Newcastle, shunning altercations with colonial assemblies, gave a military character to the interference of Great Britain in American affairs. To New York Lords of Trade to Sir Charles Hardy. chap. IX.} 1756. instructions were sent not to press the establishment of a perpetual revenue for the present. The northern colonies, whose successes at Lake George had mitigated the disgraces of the previous year, were encouraged by a remuneration; and, as a measure of temporary expediency, not of perma
Granville (search for this): chapter 9
e sea, as the cause of all misfortunes. Newcastle suggested trifles, to delay a decision. If we are convinced it must be war, I, said Cumberland, have no notion of not making the most of the strength and opportunity in our hands. The Earl of Granville was against meddling with trade. It is vexing your neighbors for a little muck. I, said Newcastle, the prime minister, think some middle way may be found out. He was asked what way. To be sure, he replied, Hawke must go out; but he may be och was only a waste of money; but not a system of treaties, dangerous to the liberties of Germany and of Europe. Nervous from fright, Newcastle was disposed at once to resign power to Fox. You are not fit to be first minister, was the sneer of Granville; and Newcastle did not recover courage till in November Fox consented to accept the seals and defend the treaties. At the great debate, Walpole's Memoires of George I., i. 418. Pitt taunted the majority, which was as three to one, with corr
Benjamin Franklin (search for this): chapter 9
garrison of seven hundred men, he left the borders of Lake Ontario. At this time a paper by Franklin, published in Boston, and reprinted in London, had drawn the attention of all observers to the to pay five thousand pounds towards the public defence, had granted fifty-five thousand more. Franklin, who was one of the commissioners to apply the money, yielded to the wish of the governor, and bitants lay near the ashes of their houses unburied, exposed to birds and beasts of prey. With Franklin came every thing that could restore security; and his prudence, humanity, and pa- chap. IX.} to form companies which themselves elected their officers. The officers of the companies chose Franklin colonel of their regiment of twelve hundred men, and he accepted the post. Here again was a new increase of popular power. Franklin, with his military command, might, it was feared, wrest the government from the proprietaries; nor would the metropolis tolerate a militia which had the appoin
Lawrence Washington (search for this): chapter 9
he outposts, from the Potomac to Fort Dinwiddie, on Jackson's River; but he had not force enough to protect the region. The low countries could not spare their white men, for these must watch their negro slaves. From the Western Valley every settler had already been driven. From the valley of the Shenandoah they were beginning to retreat, in droves of fifties, till the Blue Ridge became the frontier of Virginia. The supplicating tears of the women and moving petitions of the men, wrote Washington, melt me into such deadly sorrow, that, for the people's ease, I could offer myself a willing sacrifice to the butchering enemy. The interior settlements of Pennsylvania were exposed to the same calamities, and domestic faction impeded measures of defence. In that province, where popular power was intrenched impregnably, the proprietaries, acting in concert with the Board of Trade, sought to enlarge their prerogatives; to take into their own hands the management of the revenue from ex
August William (search for this): chapter 9
nder it were cancelled; the companies themselves were broken up and dispersed. And while volunteers were not allowed to organize themselves for defence, the humble intercession of the Quakers with the Delawares, the little covenants resting on confidence and ratified by presents, peaceful stipulations for the burial of the tomahawk and the security of the frontier fireside and the cradle, were censured by Lord Halifax as the most daring violation of the royal prerogative. Each northern province also was forbidden to negotiate with the Indians; and their renations were intrusted solely to Sir William Johnson, chap. IX.} 1756. with no subordination but to Loudoun. Yet all could not prevail. In a few years, said one, who, after a long settlement in New England, had just returned home, the colonies of America will be independent of Britain; and at least one voice was raised to advise the sending out of Duke William of Cumberland to be their sovereign and emancipating them at once.
De Vaudreuil (search for this): chapter 9
s more adventurous. Boldness wins, was Dieskau's maxim. Doreil to the Minister, 28 Oct. 1755. Abandoning the well-concerted plan of an attack on Oswego, Vaudreuil to the Minister, 24 July, 1755. Vaudreuil sent him to oppose the army of Johnson. For the defence of the crumbling fortress at Crown Point, seven hundred regulaVaudreuil sent him to oppose the army of Johnson. For the defence of the crumbling fortress at Crown Point, seven hundred regulars, sixteen hundred Canadians, and seven hundred savages had assembled. Of these, three hundred or more were emigrants from the Six Nations, domiciliated in Canada. Eager for distinction, Dieskau, taking with him six hundred savages, as many Canadians, and two hundred regular troops, ascended Lake Champlain to its head, and, aftel; and now, mangled and helpless, lay a prisoner within the limits of the pretended French dominion. Dieskau to the ministers, 14 September, 1755, and also to Vaudreuil. Letters of Montreuil. Of the Americans there fell on that day about two hundred and sixteen, and ninety-six were wounded; of the French the loss was not m
mangled and helpless, lay a prisoner within the limits of the pretended French dominion. Dieskau to the ministers, 14 September, 1755, and also to Vaudreuil. Letters of Montreuil. Of the Americans there fell on that day about two hundred and sixteen, and ninety-six were wounded; of the French the loss was not much greater. Towards chap. IX.} 1755. sunset, a party of three hundred French, who had rallied, and were retreating in a body, at two miles from the lake, were attacked by McGinnes, of New Hampshire, who, with two hundred men of that colony, was marching across the portage from Fort Edward. Panic-stricken by the well concerted movement, the enemy fled, leaving their baggage; but the brave McGinnes was mortally wounded. The disasters of the year led the English ministry to exult in the defeat and repulse of Dieskau. The House of Lords, in an elegant address, praised the colonists as brave and faithful; Johnson became a baronet, and received a gratuity of five thou
William Johnson (search for this): chapter 9
tions had assembled at Albany. The army with which Johnson was to reduce Crown Point consisted of New England d to thirty-four hundred men, were conducted by William Johnson across the portage of twelve miles, to the soutcalled the Lake of the Holy Sacrament I found, said Johnson, a mere wilderness; never was house or fort erected here before; Johnson to Lords of Trade, 8 Sept. 1755. and naming the waters Lake George, he cleared space fuly, 1755. Vaudreuil sent him to oppose the army of Johnson. For the defence of the crumbling fortress at Crowterly. The battle began between eleven and twelve; Johnson, slightly wounded, left the field at the beginning dress, praised the colonists as brave and faithful; Johnson became a baronet, and received a gratuity of five t seemed a war for Protestantism and freedom. But Johnson knew not how to profit by success; with a busy air,and their renations were intrusted solely to Sir William Johnson, chap. IX.} 1756. with no subordination but
Henry Fox (search for this): chapter 9
ngerous to the liberties of Germany and of Europe. Nervous from fright, Newcastle was disposed at once to resign power to Fox. You are not fit to be first minister, was the sneer of Granville; and Newcastle did not recover courage till in November Fox consented to accept the seals and defend the treaties. At the great debate, Walpole's Memoires of George I., i. 418. Pitt taunted the majority, which was as three to one, with corruption and readiness to follow their leader; and, indirectly minions, if properly protected, will be the Western and best empire in the world. Lieutenant-Governor Dinwiddie to Secretary Fox, 1756. With more elaborateness and authority, Shirley, Shirley to Lords of Trade, 5 January, 1756. by his milithe arrangements were completed. The plan was now to be partially carried into effect. On the instance of Cumberland and Fox, Shirley was superseded and ordered to return to England, and the Earl of Loudoun, a friend of Halifax, passionately zealo
s. The capture of the Alcide and the Lys by Boscawen, known in London on the fifteenth of July, Memoire contenant le Precis des Faits, 54, 55. was an act of open hostility, and it was considered what instructions should be given to the British marine. The princess, mother of George the Third, inveighed most bitterly against not pushing the French every where; the parliament would never bear the suffering the French to bring home their trade and sailors. Dodington's Diary. She wished Hanover in the sea, as the cause of all misfortunes. Newcastle suggested trifles, to delay a decision. If we are convinced it must be war, I, said Cumberland, have no notion of not making the most of the strength and opportunity in our hands. The Earl of Granville was against meddling with trade. It is vexing your neighbors for a little muck. I, said Newcastle, the prime minister, think some middle way may be found out. He was asked what way. To be sure, he replied, Hawke must go out; but he
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