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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition.. Search the whole document.

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John Stark (search for this): chapter 9
rpretation of the bounda- chap. IX.} 1755. ries of Acadia was made good by occupation, the troops for the central expeditions had assembled at Albany. The army with which Johnson was to reduce Crown Point consisted of New England militia, chiefly from Connecticut and Massachusetts. A regiment of five hundred foresters of New Hampshire were raising a fort in Coos, on the Connecticut; but, under a new summons, they made the long march through the pathless region to Albany. Among them was John Stark, then a lieutenant, of a rugged nature, but of the coolest judgment; skilled at discovering the paths of the wilderness, and knowing the way to the hearts of the backwoodsmen. The French, on the other hand, called every able-bodied man in the district of Montreal into active service for the defence of Crown Point, so that reapers had to be sent up from Three Rivers and Quebec to gather in the harvest. Breard to the Minister, 13 August, 1755. Early in August, the New England men, ha
Hanbury Williams (search for this): chapter 9
turned to Russia; and with as much blindness to the interests of their country, as indifference to every thing but the possession of place, they instructed Sir Hanbury Williams, the new envoy at St. Petersburg, a diplomatist boastful of his powers of observation, and yet credulous and easily deceived, to introduce Russia as superhap. IX.} 1755 of the affairs of Germany. Seize the opportunity, such was the substance of the instructions given Instructions from Lord Holdernesse to Sir Hanbury Williams, 11 April, 1755. Von Raumer's Beytrage, II. 286. by the British ministry to the British ambassador of that day, seize the opportunity to convince the Russchef, would be extremely agreeable. Fifty thousand pounds for the private purse of the empress would put her and her court at his majesty's management. Sir Hanbury Williams to Holdernesse, 9 and 11 August, 1755. So venal were the princes of that day, that the aid of the Russian empire was for sale; and the empress herself in t
n, the acknowledged Envoy of the free and United States of America. The military operations in America might be respectively explained as acts of defence, to be settled by an adjustment of boundaries. The capture of the Alcide and the Lys by Boscawen, known in London on the fifteenth of July, Memoire contenant le Precis des Faits, 54, 55. was an act of open hostility, and it was considered what instructions should be given to the British marine. The princess, mother of George the Third, ld in captivity. All France resented the perfidy. Never, said Louis the Fifteenth, will I forgive the piracies of this insolent nation; and, in a letter to George the Second, he demanded ample reparation for the insult to the flag of France by Boscawen, and for the piracies of the English men-of-war, committed in defiance of international law, the faith of treaties, the usages of civilized nations, and the reciprocal duties of kings. Louis XV. to Geo. II., 21 October, 1755. The wound infli
Charles Yorke (search for this): chapter 9
company. Having nothing to rely on but the corrupt influence of the aristocracy, Newcastle now sought to unite it, by a distribution of pensions and places. This is the moment when Hillsborough first obtained an employment, when the family of Yorke named Soame Jenyns for a Lord of Trade; and when Bed- chap IX.} 1755. ford was propitiated by the appointment of his partisan, Richard Rigby, to a seat at the same Board. The administration proceeded, possessing the vote but not the respect ofof parliament for an American revenue. The obstinacy of Pennsylvania was pleaded as requiring it. Garth's Report of the Debate in the House of Commons, Feb. 3, 1766. On the questions affecting that province, the Board of Trade listened to Charles Yorke on the side of prerogative, while Charles Pratt spoke for colonial liberty; and after a long hearing, Halifax and Soame Jenyns, and Bedford's dependent, Richard Rigby, and Talbot joined in advising an immediate act of the British legislature
think the people would readily, acquiesce. The success of any other measure would be doubtful; and, suggesting a stamp-duty, as well as an excise and a poll-tax, he advised for the general satisfaction of the people in each colony, to leave it to their choice to raise the sum assessed upon them according to their own discretion; but, in case of failure, proper officers were to collect the revenue by warrants of distress and imprisonment of persons. See the Pamphlet written jointly by Win. Knox and George Grenville. The Controversy between Great Britain and her Colonies Reviewed, pp. 196, 197. Shirley was a civilian, versed in English law, and now for many years a crown officer in the colonies. His opinion carried great weight, and it became, henceforward, a firm persuasion among the Lords of Trade, especially Halifax, Soame Jenyns, and Rigby, as well as with all who busied themselves with schemes of government for America, that the British parliament must take upon itself the est
Richard Rigby (search for this): chapter 9
ment, when the family of Yorke named Soame Jenyns for a Lord of Trade; and when Bed- chap IX.} 1755. ford was propitiated by the appointment of his partisan, Richard Rigby, to a seat at the same Board. The administration proceeded, possessing the vote but not the respect of parliament; at variance with the people of England and in the colonies. His opinion carried great weight, and it became, henceforward, a firm persuasion among the Lords of Trade, especially Halifax, Soame Jenyns, and Rigby, as well as with all who busied themselves with schemes of government for America, that the British parliament must take upon itself the establishment and collecti Yorke on the side of prerogative, while Charles Pratt spoke for colonial liberty; and after a long hearing, Halifax and Soame Jenyns, and Bedford's dependent, Richard Rigby, and Talbot joined in advising an immediate act of the British legislature to overrule the charter of the colony. But the ministry was rent by factions, and t
Americans (search for this): chapter 9
them a general fund, to be issued and applied as the commander-in-chief should direct, and provision for all such charges as might arise from furnishing quarters. The administration was confirmed in its purpose of throwing the burden of furnishing quarters upon the colonies by the authority of Murray. His opinion against the statute of Pennsylvania, which, in extending the act of parliament to punish mutiny, regulated the providing of quarters, drew a distinction between Englishmen and Americans. The law, said he, assumes propositions true in the mother country, and rightly asserted in the reign of Charles the First and Charles the Second, in times of peace, and when soldiers were kept up without the consent of parliament; but the application of such positions, in tine of war, in the case of troops raised for their pro- chap. IX.} 1756. tection by the authority of parliament,—made the first time by an assembly, many of whom plead what they call conscience for not joining in the
ld be extremely agreeable. Fifty thousand pounds for the private purse of the empress would put her and her court at his majesty's management. Sir Hanbury Williams to Holdernesse, 9 and 11 August, 1755. So venal were the princes of that day, that the aid of the Russian empire was for sale; and the empress herself in the market at fifty thousand pounds. Friedrich von Raumer's Konig Friedrich II. und seine Zeit, 294. At the same time an extravagant treaty for subsidies was framed with Hesse, Jenkinson's Collection of Treaties, III. 30-53. whose Elector bargained at high chap. IX.} 1755. rates for the use of his troops for the defence of Han over, or if needed, of the British dominions. Newcastle was sure of his majority in the House of Commons; but William Pitt, though poor, and recently married, and holding the lucrative office of paymaster, declared his purpose of opposing the treaty with Russia. Newcastle sent for Pitt, offered him kind words from his sovereign, influe
Joseph Hawley. Seth Pomroy (search for this): chapter 9
d Johnson, a mere wilderness; never was house or fort erected here before; Johnson to Lords of Trade, 8 Sept. 1755. and naming the waters Lake George, he cleared space for a camp of five thousand men. The lake protects him on the north; his flanks are covered by a thick wood and a swamp. The tents of the husbandmen and mechanics, who form his summer army, are spread on a rising ground; but no fortifications are raised, nor is even a trench thrown up. Elisha Hawley to his brother Joseph Hawley. Seth Pomroy's Journal. On week-days, the men, accustomed to freedom, saunter to and fro in idleness; or some, weary of inaction, are ready to mutiny and go home. On Sunday, all come forth and collect in the groves for the Worship of God; three hundred red men, also, regularly enlisted under the English flag, and paid from the English treasury, seat themselves on the hillock, and, while the light of a summer's afternoon is shedding its sweetest influence on the tops of the forest-clad moun
Thomas Gage (search for this): chapter 9
many letters to his correspondents. See the Correspondence of Sharpe with his brother in England, and his colleagues in America. His colleagues and the officers of the army were equally importunate. If 1756 they expect success at home, wrote Gage, in January, 1756, echoing the common opinion of those around him, acts of parliament must be made to tax the chap. IX.} 1756. provinces, in proportion to what each is able to bear; to make one common fund and pursue one uniform plan for America. Gage to the Earl of Albemarle, 22 Jan., 1756. You, said Sir Charles Hardy, the new governor of New York to the Lords of Trade, you will be much more able to settle it for us, than we can ourselves. Sir Charles Hardy to the Lords of Trade, January, 1756. From the Old Dominion, Dinwiddie continued to urge a general land-tax and poll-tax for all the colonies. Our people, said he, will be inflamed, if they hear of my making this proposal; but he reiterated the hopelessness of obtaining
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