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of a second lieutenant. Records at Hartford for 29 Geo. II. Putnam's commission as 2nd Lieut. in the 6th co and the reciprocal duties of kings. Louis XV. to Geo. II., 21 October, 1755. The wound inflicted on Franceone power established there. Walpole's Memoires of Geo. II., II., 8. The militia law of Pennsylvania, he saie schemes of finance; and the British statutes, 29 Geo. II., c. XXVI.; 31 Geo. II., c. XXXVI., § 8; 1 Geo. IGeo. II., c. XXXVI., § 8; 1 Geo. III., c. IV. which manifest the settled purpose Letter of Bollan to Massachusetts, in May, 1756. of raising aGeo. III., c. IV. which manifest the settled purpose Letter of Bollan to Massachusetts, in May, 1756. of raising a revenue out of the traffic between the American continent and the West India Islands, show that the execution rs and officers to enlist a regiment of aliens. 29 Geo. II., c. v. Indented servants might be accepted, and for compensation to the respective assemblies; 29 Geo. II., c. XXXV. and the naval code of England was exteakes, great waters, or rivers of North America. 29 Geo. II., c. XXVII. The militia law of Pennsylvania was r
ille; and Newcastle did not recover courage till in November Fox consented to accept the seals and defend the treaties. At the great debate, Walpole's Memoires of George I., i. 418. Pitt taunted the majority, which was as three to one, with corruption and readiness to follow their leader; and, indirectly attacking the subjection of the throne to aristocratic influence, declared that the king owes a supreme service to his people. Pitt was dismissed from office, and George Grenville, with Legge, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, and Charles Townshend, went into retirement in his company. Having nothing to rely on but the corrupt influence of the aristocracy, Newcastle now sought to unite it, by a distribution of pensions and places. This is the moment when Hillsborough first obtained an employment, when the family of Yorke named Soame Jenyns for a Lord of Trade; and when Bed- chap IX.} 1755. ford was propitiated by the appointment of his partisan, Richard Rigby, to a seat at t
Hugh Mercer (search for this): chapter 9
military stores over the morasses. On the twenty-first of August, Shirley reached Oswego. Weeks passed in building boats; on the eighteenth of September, six hundred men were to embark on Lake Ontario, when a storm prevented; afterwards head winds raged; then a tempest made navigation difficult; then sickness prevailed; then the Indians deserted; and then the season gave him an excuse for retreating. So, on the twenty-fourth of October, having constructed a new fort at Oswego, and placed Mercer in command, with a garrison of seven hundred men, he left the borders of Lake Ontario. At this time a paper by Franklin, published in Boston, and reprinted in London, had drawn the attention of all observers to the rapid increase of the population in the colonies. Paper annexed to William Clarke's Observations on the late and present conduct of the French, 1755. Upon the best inquiry chap. IX.} 1755. I can make, wrote Shirley, I have found the calcunations right. The number of the i
Shawanese Indians (search for this): chapter 9
to gather in the harvest. Breard to the Minister, 13 August, 1755. Early in August, the New England men, having Phinehas Lyman for their major-general, were finishing Fort Edward, at the portage between the Hudson chap. IX.} 1755. and the headsprings of the Sorel. The forests were never free from secret danger; American scalps were sought for by the wakeful savage, to be strung together for the adornment of the wigwam. Towards the end of August, the untrained forces, which, with Indians, amounted to thirty-four hundred men, were conducted by William Johnson across the portage of twelve miles, to the southern shore of the Lake, which the French called the Lake of the Holy Sacrament I found, said Johnson, a mere wilderness; never was house or fort erected here before; Johnson to Lords of Trade, 8 Sept. 1755. and naming the waters Lake George, he cleared space for a camp of five thousand men. The lake protects him on the north; his flanks are covered by a thick wood and a
Histoire Philosophique (search for this): chapter 9
assan: Histoire de la Diplomatie Francoise, VI. France and England were still at peace; and their commerce was mutually protected by the sanctity of treaties. Of a sudden, hostile orders were issued to all British vessels of war to take all French vessels, private as well as public; and, without warning, ships from the French colonies, the ships bound from Martinico to Marseilles, freighted with the rich products of plantations tilled by the slaves of the Jesuits, De Tocqueville: Histoire Philosophique du regne de Louis XV. II. 287. the fishing-smacks in which the humble Breton mariners ventured to Newfoundland, whale-ships returning from their adventures, the scanty fortunes with which poor men freighted the little barks engaged in the coasting trade, were within one month, by violence and by cowardly artifices, seized by the British marine, and carried into English ports. What has taken place, wrote Rouille, under the eye of Louis the Fifteenth, is nothing but a system of piracy
Israel Putnam (search for this): chapter 9
war, Ephraim Williams, a Massachusetts colonel, the same who, in passing through Albany, had made a bequest of his estate by will to found a free school, was sent with a thousand men to relieve Fort Edward. Among chap. IX.} 1755. them was Israel Putnam, to whom, at the age of thirty-seven, the Assembly at Connecticut had just given the rank of a second lieutenant. Records at Hartford for 29 Geo. II. Putnam's commission as 2nd Lieut. in the 6th company of the 3rd Regiment of Connecticut,Putnam's commission as 2nd Lieut. in the 6th company of the 3rd Regiment of Connecticut, forwarded not before September 2, reached him after the battle. Two hundred warriors of the Six Nations went also, led by Hendrick, the gray-haired chieftain, famed for his clear voice and flashing eye. They marched with rash confidence, a little less than three miles, to a defile, where the French and Indians had posted themselves on both sides of the way, concealed on the left by the thickets in the swamps, on the right by rocks and the forest that covered the continued rising ground. Before
their baggage; but the brave McGinnes was mortally wounded. The disasters of the year led the English ministry to exult in the defeat and repulse of Dieskau. The House of Lords, in an elegant address, praised the colonists as brave and faithful; Johnson became a baronet, and received a gratuity of five thousand pounds. But he did little to gain the victory, which was due to the enthusiasm of the New England men. Our all, they cried, depends on the success of this expedition. Come, said Pomeroy, of Massachusetts, to his friends at home, come to the help of the Lord against the mighty; you that value our holy religion and our liberties will spare nothing, even to the one half of your estate. And in all the villages the prayers of God's people went up, that they might be crowned with victory to the glory of God; for the war with France seemed a war for Protestantism and freedom. But Johnson knew not how to profit by success; with a busy air, he kept the men all day on their arms
George Lyttelton (search for this): chapter 9
ising an immediate act of the British legislature to overrule the charter of the colony. But the ministry was rent by factions, and their fluctuating tenure of office made it difficult to mature novel or daring measures of legislation. There existed no central will, that could conquer Canada, or subvert the liberties of America. A majority of the Treasury Board, as well as the Board of Trade, favored American taxation by act of parliament; none scrupled as to the power; but the unfit Lyttelton, then chancellor of the exchequer, chap. IX.} 1756. though fixed in his opinions, could not mature schemes of finance; and the British statutes, 29 Geo. II., c. XXVI.; 31 Geo. II., c. XXXVI., § 8; 1 Geo. III., c. IV. which manifest the settled purpose Letter of Bollan to Massachusetts, in May, 1756. of raising a revenue out of the traffic between the American continent and the West India Islands, show that the execution of that purpose was at that session, and twice afterwards, defe
William Clarke (search for this): chapter 9
then sickness prevailed; then the Indians deserted; and then the season gave him an excuse for retreating. So, on the twenty-fourth of October, having constructed a new fort at Oswego, and placed Mercer in command, with a garrison of seven hundred men, he left the borders of Lake Ontario. At this time a paper by Franklin, published in Boston, and reprinted in London, had drawn the attention of all observers to the rapid increase of the population in the colonies. Paper annexed to William Clarke's Observations on the late and present conduct of the French, 1755. Upon the best inquiry chap. IX.} 1755. I can make, wrote Shirley, I have found the calcunations right. The number of the inhabitants is doubled every twenty years; and as the demand for British manufactures, with a corresponding employment of shipping, increased with even greater rapidity, he found in them inexhaustible resources of wealth for a maritime power. But this great increase, combined with the political vigo
Charles Hardy (search for this): chapter 9
one common fund and pursue one uniform plan for America. Gage to the Earl of Albemarle, 22 Jan., 1756. You, said Sir Charles Hardy, the new governor of New York to the Lords of Trade, you will be much more able to settle it for us, than we can ourselves. Sir Charles Hardy to the Lords of Trade, January, 1756. From the Old Dominion, Dinwiddie continued to urge a general land-tax and poll-tax for all the colonies. Our people, said he, will be inflamed, if they hear of my making this p next entry into that town! Shirley, who wished to make him second Shirley to Sharpe, 16 May, 1756. Halifax to Sir Charles Hardy, 31 March, 1756. in command in an expedition against Fort Duquesne, sustained his claim. Shirley to Sharpe, 5 Mae a military character to the interference of Great Britain in American affairs. To New York Lords of Trade to Sir Charles Hardy. chap. IX.} 1756. instructions were sent not to press the establishment of a perpetual revenue for the present. T
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