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to Same, 3 June, 1769. with un- Chap. XXXIX.} 1769. Jan. surpassed distinctness, Andrew Eliot to T. Hollism strife by some Plan of Union; Chap. XXXIX.} 1769. Jan. that Grafton, who was much connected with New-York, recommended to remove the main Chap. XXXIX.} 1769. Jan. objection to Parliamentary authority, by the offer tState. He had put many sugges- Chap. XXXIX.} 1769. Jan. tions on paper, but behind all he had further though Israel Williams, 26 Jan. 1769. Chap. XXXIX.} 1769. Jan. amounting to treason, was taking depositions, so tha power, repeated the people, is Chap. XXXIX.} 1769. Jan. the last resource of ignorant despotism. The opposi the whole plan, as no more than Chap. XXXIX.} 1769 Jan. angry words, and the wisdom fools put on. Lord Nort just; his language flowing and Chap. XXXIX.} 1769. Jan. forcible; his voice and action animated; warmed by t the New World; and whether the Chap. XXXIX.} 1769. Jan. weakening of a common enemy can compensate the risk
January 26th (search for this): chapter 16
triot was in earnest. Since Great Britain persisted in enforcing her Revenue Act, he knew no remedy but American Independence. Lord North, though he feared to strike, wished to intimidate. He would not allow a Petition from the Council of Massachusetts Cavendish Debates, i. 185, &c. for the Repeal of Townshend's Act to be referred with the other American papers; nor would he receive a Petition which denied that the Act of Henry the Eighth extended to the Colonies; and on the twenty-sixth of January after a delay of many weeks, he asked the House of Commons to agree with the Resolves and Address of the House of Lords. Parliamentary History, XVI. 485, &c. Ms. Letters and Diary of W. S. Johnson; Cavendish Debates, i. 191 &c. Thomas Pownall to S. Cooper, 30 Jan. 1769. T. Whately to Hutchinson, 11 Feb. 1769. No lawyer, said Dowdeswell, will justify them; none but the House of Lords who think only of their dignity, could have originated them. Suppose, said Edmund Burke, you do c
hatelet to Choiseul, London, 28 January, 1769. This letter from Du Chatelet to Choiseul, was Feb. inspired neither by the Courtiers, nor the Parliaments, nor the Aristocracy, nor even by the Burguncil. An extract of it was sent to Madrid, to ascertain the sentiments and Chap XXXIX.} 1769. Feb. intentions of the Catholic King; the Minister of the marine and the Minister of finance were dire were I an American I would not submit to it. On the other side little was Chap. XXXIX.} 1769. Feb. urged, except that concession would endanger the Act of Navigation; and the British Parliament afnville Papers, IV. 417. While England was enforcing its restrictive corn- Chap. XXXIX} 1769. Feb. mercial system with the most jealous vigilance, T. Bradshaw to R. Sutton, Esq. 25 Feb. 1769; Tsides; thus Grimaldi, the Spanish Minister, gave his definitive answer; the Chap. XXXIX.} 1769. Feb. position and strength of the countries occupied by the Americans, excite a just alarm for the ric
February 8th (search for this): chapter 16
ommerce of the Kingdom; while Choiseul, aware of the novelty of a system founded on the principle of a free trade, looked about him on every side for prevailing arguments and motives against hereditary prepossessions. Choiseul to Du Chatelet, 6 Feb. 1769. While the proposals were under consideration, the state of America was again the theme of conversation in the House of Commons; Cavendish Debates, i. 207, &c. W. S. Johnson to Gov. Pitkin, 9 Feb. 1769. where once more on the eighth of February, strenuous efforts were made to prove the illegality and cruelty of fetching Americans across the Atlantic for trial. They may save themselves, said Rose Fuller, by going still further, and bringing the question to the point of arms.—You have no right to tax the Colonies, repeated Beckford; the system has not produced a single shilling to the exchequer; the money is all eaten up by the officers who collect it.—Your measures, cried Phipps after an admirable statement, are more calcul
the Colonies continued. December, 1768—February, 1769. the opinion of Parliament was hardly pro- Chap. XXXIX.} 1768. Dec. nounced, when Du Chatelet again pressed America on the attention of Choiseul. Without exaggerating the projects or the unily developed. This new order of things, this event which will necessarily have the greatest influ- Chap. XXXIX.} 1768. Dec. ence on the whole political system of Europe, will probably be brought about within a very few years. Du Chatelet to Choisng men. I will, therefore, for the present only propose several Resolutions which may show the sense Chap. XXXIX.} 1768. Dec. of the Legislature. If this is not sufficient, the hand of power must be lifted up, and the whole force of this country eod, Hood to Stephens, 12 Dec. 1768. In Letters to the Ministry, 113. who had the chief command of Chap. XXXIX.} 1768. Dec. the ships in the harbor. But Samuel Adams, whom it was especially desired to take off for treason, unawed by the menaces
ion of the Colonies continued. December, 1768—February, 1769. the opinion of Parliament was hardly pro- Chap. XXXIX.} 1768. Dec. nounced, when Du Chatelet again pressed America on the attention of Choiseul. Without exaggerating the projects or speedily developed. This new order of things, this event which will necessarily have the greatest influ- Chap. XXXIX.} 1768. Dec. ence on the whole political system of Europe, will probably be brought about within a very few years. Du Chatelet toesigning men. I will, therefore, for the present only propose several Resolutions which may show the sense Chap. XXXIX.} 1768. Dec. of the Legislature. If this is not sufficient, the hand of power must be lifted up, and the whole force of this couote Hood, Hood to Stephens, 12 Dec. 1768. In Letters to the Ministry, 113. who had the chief command of Chap. XXXIX.} 1768. Dec. the ships in the harbor. But Samuel Adams, whom it was especially desired to take off for treason, unawed by the me
November 7th, 1768 AD (search for this): chapter 16
illsborough, 26 January, 1769. furnished lists of persons whose appointment they advised. They both importuned the Ministry to remove Temple, Bernard to Hillsborough, 21 Feb. 1769. Hutchinson to the Duke of Grafton. who would not conceal his opinion, Boston Gazette of 6 Feb. 1769; 723, 1 and 2. The notes to the Letter from London are by Temple. that the affections of the colonists were wasting away from the mother country, from the incapacity and avarice Temple to Grenville, 7 November, 1768; in Grenville Papers, IV. 396, and compare 460. of his associates. The wily Hutchinson opposed with all his influence the repeal of the Revenue Act; Hutchinson to Richard Jackson, 24 Jan. 1769. recommended to remove the main Chap. XXXIX.} 1769. Jan. objection to Parliamentary authority, by the offer to the colonists of such a plan of representation in the British Parliament, as he knew they must reject; Hutchinson to Richard Jackson, 24 Jan. 1769, and to Gov. Pownall, 29 Jan. 1
December, 1768 AD (search for this): chapter 16
Chapter 39: A way to take off the Incendiaries.—Hillsborough's Ad-Ministration of the Colonies continued. December, 1768—February, 1769. the opinion of Parliament was hardly pro- Chap. XXXIX.} 1768. Dec. nounced, when Du Chatelet again pressed America on the attention of Choiseul. Without exaggerating the projects or the union of the Colonies, said he, the time of their independence is very near. Their prudent men believe the moment not yet come; but if the English government undertakes vigorous measures, who can tell how far the fanaticism for liberty may carry an immense people, dwelling for the most part in the interior of a continent, remote from imminent danger? And if the metropolis should persevere, can the union, which is now their strength, be maintained without succor from abroad? Even if the rupture should be premature, can France and Spain neglect to profit by the opportunity which they may never find again? Three years ago the separation of the Eng
December 5th, 1768 AD (search for this): chapter 16
tters to the Ministry, 113. who had the chief command of Chap. XXXIX.} 1768. Dec. the ships in the harbor. But Samuel Adams, whom it was especially desired to take off for treason, unawed by the menaces of arbitrary power, Boston Gazette, 5 Dec. 1768. pursued his system without fear or faltering. I must, said he, Boston Gazette, 5 Dec. 1768. tell the men, who on both sides of the Atlantic charge America with rebellion, that military power will never prevail on an American to surrender 5 Dec. 1768. tell the men, who on both sides of the Atlantic charge America with rebellion, that military power will never prevail on an American to surrender his liberty; and through the press he taught the public that a standing army, Vindex, in Boston Gazette, 19 Dec. 1768. kept up in the Colonies in time of peace without their consent, was as flagrant a violation of the Constitution as the laying a tax on paper, glass, painters' colors and tea. To effect the removal of the troops from Boston was his unremitting care. In the mean time he sought in the common law the means to curb their insolence; and called upon the magistrates of Boston to go
December 9th, 1768 AD (search for this): chapter 16
y which they may never find again? Three years ago the separation of the English Colonies was looked upon as an object of attention for the next generation; the germs were observed, but no one could foresee that they would be so speedily developed. This new order of things, this event which will necessarily have the greatest influ- Chap. XXXIX.} 1768. Dec. ence on the whole political system of Europe, will probably be brought about within a very few years. Du Chatelet to Choiseul, 9 December, 1768. Your views, replied Choiseul, are as subtle as they are comprehensive and well considered. The King is perfectly aware of their sagacity and solidity; and I will communicate them to the Court of Madrid. Choiseul to Du Chatelet, 20 December, 1768. The statesmen of France had their best allies in the British Ministry, who hoped to control America by menace and terror. The matter is now brought to a point; said Hillsborough in the House of Lords. Parliamentary History, XVI
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