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Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
Hutchinson opposed with all his influence the repeal of the Revenue Act; Hutchinson to Richard Jackson, 24 Jan. 1769. recommended to remove the main Chap. XXXIX.} 1769. Jan. objection to Parliamentary authority, by the offer to the colonists of such a plan of representation in the British Parliament, as he knew they must reject; Hutchinson to Richard Jackson, 24 Jan. 1769, and to Gov. Pownall, 29 Jan. 1769. informed against the free constitutions of Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island as tending to produce another Congress; From the Draft by Hutchinson. and advised and solicited and importunately demanded such an extension of the laws of Treason as would have rendered every considerable man in Boston liable to its penalties. In letters to a member of that Parliament, Thos. Hutchinson to T. Whately, 20 Jan. 1769. whose authority he wished it made treasonable to deny,—written for public purposes, Of a previous Letter Whately writes, I have not been wanting to s
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
Vindex, Samuel Adams, in Boston Gazette, 12 Dec. 1768. The Justices of the Peace for Suffolk at their Quarter Sessions, and the Grand Jury, over which the Crown had no control, never failed to find indictments against soldiers and officers, for their frequent transgressions; See the many indictments of officers as well as of soldiers. and if they escaped the penalties of conviction, it was through the favoritism of a higher Court. Every where the British claims of power were denied. Georgia approved the conduct and correspondence of Massachusetts and Virginia. Boston Gazette of 13 Feb. 1769; 734, 1, 1. New-York completed the expression of American opinion, by unanimously asserting its legislative rights Journal of New-York Assembly for 31 Dec. 1768, p. 70. Governor Moore to Hillsborough, 4 January, 1769; Compare Same to Same, 30 March, 1769, and Same to Same, 3 June, 1769. with un- Chap. XXXIX.} 1769. Jan. surpassed distinctness, Andrew Eliot to T. Hollis, 29 Januar
Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 16
d to the decision of the Chambers of Commerce. We know their principles. They regard every thing in colonial commerce which does not turn exclusively to the benefit of the Kingdom, as contrary to the end for which Colonies were established, and as a theft from the State. To practise on these maxims is impossible. The wants of trade are stronger than the laws of trade. The North of America can alone furnish supplies to its South. This is the only point of view under which the cession of Canada can be regarded as a loss for France; but that cession will one day be amply compensated for, if it shall cause the rebellion and independence of the English Colonies, which become every day more probable and more near. Du Chatelet to Choiseul, 17 February, 1769. At the same time the Parisian world was alive with enthusiasm for the Americans, and with admiration for their illustrious advocates. Extract of a Letter from London, of 5 April, 1769. But Spain had been the parent of the pro
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
n, it was through the favoritism of a higher Court. Every where the British claims of power were denied. Georgia approved the conduct and correspondence of Massachusetts and Virginia. Boston Gazette of 13 Feb. 1769; 734, 1, 1. New-York completed the expression of American opinion, by unanimously asserting its legislative rient, as he knew they must reject; Hutchinson to Richard Jackson, 24 Jan. 1769, and to Gov. Pownall, 29 Jan. 1769. informed against the free constitutions of Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island as tending to produce another Congress; From the Draft by Hutchinson. and advised and solicited and importunately demanded suce knew no remedy but American Independence. Lord North, though he feared to strike, wished to intimidate. He would not allow a Petition from the Council of Massachusetts Cavendish Debates, i. 185, &c. for the Repeal of Townshend's Act to be referred with the other American papers; nor would he receive a Petition which denied
Madrid (Spain) (search for this): chapter 16
isdom of the ages from Descartes to Turgot, uttering its oracles and its counsels in the palaces of absolute monarchs. It excited the most attentive curiosity of Louis the Fifteenth and of every one of his council. An extract of it was sent to Madrid, to ascertain the sentiments and Chap XXXIX.} 1769. Feb. intentions of the Catholic King; the Minister of the marine and the Minister of finance were directed to consult the Chambers of Commerce of the Kingdom; while Choiseul, aware of the novelican form of Government; and a republic is a government dangerous from the wisdom, the consistency, and the solidity of the measures which it would adopt for executing such projects of conquests as it would naturally form. D'Ossun to Choiseul, Madrid, 20 Feb. 1769. A copy of this letter i, in the French Archives, Angleterre, T. 485, p. 473. The original is in the series marked Espagne, T. 556. Compare Choiseul to Du Chatelet, 14 March, 1769. The opinion of Spain was deliberately pronoun
New London (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
asonable and seditious writings. Bernard to Hillsborough, 25 January, 1769. A few individuals stigmatized, wrote one of Hutchinson's underlings, N. Rogers [connected with Hutchinson and Oliver], to W. S. Johnson, Jan. 1769. would cause us to reform. I sometimes wish, said one of a neighboring Colony, that two thirds of the gentlemen of the law, and as great a number of the printers, had been shipped to some sandy spot on the African shore for at least seven years. J Chew of New London, Conn. While Hutchinson, eager to find proceedings Hutchinson to Israel Williams, 26 Jan. 1769. Chap. XXXIX.} 1769. Jan. amounting to treason, was taking depositions, so that the principal ac ors might be called to account, those whom he sought to arraign as traitors were aware of his designs, publicly Boston gazette, 20 Feb. 1769, 725, 3, 1. reproached him for his baseness in performing the office of an informer while he held the post of Chief Justice, and avowed their opinions more
Suffolk, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
consent, was as flagrant a violation of the Constitution as the laying a tax on paper, glass, painters' colors and tea. To effect the removal of the troops from Boston was his unremitting care. In the mean time he sought in the common law the means to curb their insolence; and called upon the magistrates of Boston to govern, restrain, and punish soldiers of all ranks, according to the laws of the land. Vindex, Samuel Adams, in Boston Gazette, 12 Dec. 1768. The Justices of the Peace for Suffolk at their Quarter Sessions, and the Grand Jury, over which the Crown had no control, never failed to find indictments against soldiers and officers, for their frequent transgressions; See the many indictments of officers as well as of soldiers. and if they escaped the penalties of conviction, it was through the favoritism of a higher Court. Every where the British claims of power were denied. Georgia approved the conduct and correspondence of Massachusetts and Virginia. Boston Gaze
Hydra (Idaho, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
Letters and Diary of W. S. Johnson; Cavendish Debates, i. 191 &c. Thomas Pownall to S. Cooper, 30 Jan. 1769. T. Whately to Hutchinson, 11 Feb. 1769. No lawyer, said Dowdeswell, will justify them; none but the House of Lords who think only of their dignity, could have originated them. Suppose, said Edmund Burke, you do call over two or three of these unfortunate men; what will become of the rest? Let me have the heads of the principal leaders, exclaimed the Duke of Alva; these heads proved Hydra's heads. Suppose a man brought over for High Treason; if his witnesses do not appear, he cannot have a fair trial. God and nature oppose you. Grenville spoke against the Address, and scoffed at the whole plan, as no more than Chap. XXXIX.} 1769 Jan. angry words, and the wisdom fools put on. Lord North, in reply, assumed the responsibility of the measure; refused ever to give up an iota of the authority of Great Britain; and promised good results in America from the refusal to repeal th
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 16
6 17. He avowed his desire to see some further restraint, lest otherwise the connection with Great Britain should be broken; and he consoled himself for his advice, by declaring it impossible for so succession in the House of Hanover, be called a Faction. The patriot was in earnest. Since Great Britain persisted in enforcing her Revenue Act, he knew no remedy but American Independence. Lordsumed the responsibility of the measure; refused ever to give up an iota of the authority of Great Britain; and promised good results in America from the refusal to repeal the Revenue Act. It is nat Tyburn. The press also gave to the world an elaborate reply The Controversy between Great Britain and her Colonies reviewed, &c. &c., 1769. to the Farmer's Letters, for which the Board of Trshe at that early day feared America more; she preferred as a neighbor a dependent Colony to an independent Republic; and Spain was later than Great Britain itself to confess our national existence.
North America (search for this): chapter 16
recede an ace; for my part, I cannot entertain a thought of repealing the late Acts, and hope nobody will even move it, or so much as wish for it. Not the amount of the duties, which will not be more than ten thousand pounds per annum in all North America, but the principle upon which the laws are founded, is complained of. Legislation and taxation will stand or fall together. The notion of the Americans is a polytheism in politics, absurd, fatal to the constitution, and never to be admitted.ves, Angleterre, T. 485, p. 473. The original is in the series marked Espagne, T. 556. Compare Choiseul to Du Chatelet, 14 March, 1769. The opinion of Spain was deliberately pronounced and sternly adhered to. She divided the continent of North America with England, and loved to see her enemy embarrassed by war with its Colonies; but while she feared England much, she at that early day feared America more; she preferred as a neighbor a dependent Colony to an independent Republic; and Spain
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