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Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
sixty guns, commanded by Mon. tagu, the brother of Sandwich. Boston Gazette, 19 Aug. 1771. Yet there was no one salient wrong, to attract the sudden and universal attention of the people. The Southern Governors felt no alarm. Eden from Maryland congratulated Hillsborough, on the return of confidence and harmony. Robert Eden to Hillsborough, 4 August, 1771. The people, thus Johnson, the Agent of Connecticut wrote after his return home, appear to be weary of their altercations with thof this Colony which inhibit their assenting to such laws, as might Chap. XLVII.} 1772. May. check so very pernicious a commerce. In this manner Virginia led the host, who alike condemned slavery and opposed the Slave-Trade. Thousands in Maryland and in New Jersey, were ready to adopt a similar Petition; so were the Legislatures of North Carolina, of Pennsylvania, of New-York. Massachusetts, in its towns and in its Legislature, unceasingly combated the condition as well as the sale of s
Custom house (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 24
uce new collisions. Inhabitants of Providence, in Rhode Island, had in the last March, complained to the Deputy Governor of the conduct of Lieutenant Dudingston, Commander of the Gaspee, who obstructed their vessels and boats, without showing any evidence of his authority. Hopkins, the Chief Justice, on being consulted, gave the opinion, that any person who should come into the Colony and exercise any authority by force of arms, without showing his commission to the Governor, and if a Custom House officer, without being sworn into his office, was guilty of a trespass, if not piracy. The Governor, therefore, sent a sheriff on board the Gaspee, to ascertain by what orders the Lieutenant acted; and Dudingston referred the subject to the Admiral. The Admiral answered from Boston: The Lieutenant, Sir, has done his duty. I shall give the King's officers directions, that they send every man taken in molesting them to me. As sure as the people of Newport attempt to rescue any vessel,
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
sal attention of the people. The Southern Governors felt no alarm. Eden from Maryland congratulated Hillsborough, on the return of confidence and harmony. Robert Eden to Hillsborough, 4 August, 1771. The people, thus Johnson, the Agent of Connecticut wrote after his return home, appear to be weary of their altercations with the Mother Country; a little discreet conduct on both sides, would perfectly reestablish that warm affection and respect towards Great Britain, for which this country f Illinois, weary of the shameless despotism which aimed only at forestalling tracts of land, the monopoly of the Indian trade, or the ruin of the French villages, took their cause into their own hands; they demanded institutions like those of Connecticut, and set themselves inflexibly against any proposal for a Government, which should be irresponsible to themselves. In 1771, they had assembled in a General Meeting, and had fixed upon their scheme; they never departed from it; expecting to ap
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
4 March, 1772. Compare Gage to Hillsborough, 6 August, 1771; Hillsborough to Gage, 4 Dec. 1771, and 18 April, 1772. In Illinois the corruption and favoritism of the military commander compelled the people to a remonstrance. The removal of them allh agree with you, rejoined Hillsborough; a regular Government for that District would be highly improper. The people of Illinois, weary of the shameless despotism which aimed only at forestalling tracts of land, the monopoly of the Indian trade, or ll civil Magistrates. Hamilton to Gage, 8 Aug. 1772. The rights of freemen were demanded as boldly on the Prairies of Illinois as in Carolina or New England. Towards the people at Vincennes, Hillsborough was less relenting; for there was no Spaniment already seventy years old, Notre établissement est de soixante et dix annees, Memorial, 18 Sept. 1772. as those of Illinois to give up the hope of freedom. The spirit of discontent pervaded every village in the wilderness; and what allegiance
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
use in Boston. The long altercation on that subject subsided; but the system of British supremacy was sure to produce new collisions. Inhabitants of Providence, in Rhode Island, had in the last March, complained to the Deputy Governor of the conduct of Lieutenant Dudingston, Commander of the Gaspee, who obstructed their vesselsents of Darius Sessions and Chief Justice Hopkins to Chief Justice Horsmanden in January, 1773. On the ninth of June, the Providence Packet was returning to Providence, and proud of its speed, went gayly on, heedless of the Gaspee. Dudingston gave chase. The tide being at flood, the Packet ventured near shore; the Gaspee coning more water ran aground on Nauquit, a little below Pantuxet. The following night a party of men in six or seven boats, led by John Brown and Joseph Brown of Providence, and Simeon Potter of Bristol, boarded the stranded schooner, after a scuffle in which Dudingston was wounded, took and landed its crew, and then set it on fire
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 24
Chapter 47: Great Britain Centres in itself power over its Colonies. —Hillsborough's Administration of the Colonies con-cluded. June. 1771—August, 1772. regarded the contest with Massachusetts as involving not only the power of Great Britain and the rights of the Crown, but his personal honor. Wise men saw the evsides, would perfectly reestablish that warm affection and respect towards Great Britain, for which this country was once so Chap. XLVII.} 1771. Sept. Remarkable. merican dominions. We are sensible that some of your Majesty's subjects in Great Britain may reap emoluments from this sort of traffic; but when we consider, that ilonging to the fleet, and subjected the accused to a trial in any county in Great Britain. Of this statute, which violated every safeguard of July. justice and mt. They regarded the Charter as a most solemn compact, which bound them to Great Britain. By that Charter they held, they were to have a Governor and Judges, over
Haverhill (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
perennial fund raised by an Act of Parliament. They regarded the Charter as a most solemn compact, which bound them to Great Britain. By that Charter they held, they were to have a Governor and Judges, over whom the power of the King was protected by the right of nomination, the power of the Colony by the exclusive right of providing support. These views were embodied Hutchinson's History, III. 358. by Hawley in a Report to the Assembly, Report and Resolutions of 10 July, 1772; in Bradford, 325 and on the tenth of July, adopted by a vote of eighty-five to nineteen. It followed, and was so resolved, that a Governor who like Hutchinson was Chap. XLVII.} 1772. July. not dependent on the people for support, was not such a Governor as the people had consented to, at the granting of the Charter; the House most solemnly protested that the innovation was an im portant change of the Constitution, and exposed the Province to a despotic administration of Government. The inference wa
Hancock, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
fortitude. Compare Samuel Adams to James Warren of Plymouth, 25 March, 1771. He persever- Chap. XLVII.} 1771. June. ed; but John Adams retired from the service of the people, and devoting himself to his profession, John Adams: Works, II. 260, 301, 302. for a time ceased even to employ his pen in their defence. John Adams: Diary, June 22, 1771. Otis who had returned to the Legislature, disordered in mind, and jealous of his declining influence, did but impede the public cause. In Hancock, also, vanity so mingled with patriotism, that the Government hoped to separate him from its uncompromising opponents. Hutchinson to,——, 5 June, 1771. The Assembly which for the third year was convened at Cambridge, overruled the advice of Samuel Adams, and was proceeding with business. Yet it adopted the Protest in which he drew the distinction between the existence of a prerogative and its abuse; and significantly inquired, what would follow in England, if a British King should ca
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
e was led to speculate on the personal opinions of their Sovereign, and to inquire into the use of regal power itself; while the King regarded the contest with Massachusetts as involving not only the power of Great Britain and the rights of the Crown, but his personal honor. Wise men saw the event that was approaching, but not tlin foretold a bloody struggle, in which America's Chap. XLVII.} 1771. July. growing strength and magnitude, B. Franklin to Committee of Correspondence in Massachusetts, 15 May, 1771. would give her the victory. The progress of opinion was marked by the instructions of the House to its Agent, which unreservedly embodied the pe. Thousands in Maryland and in New Jersey, were ready to adopt a similar Petition; so were the Legislatures of North Carolina, of Pennsylvania, of New-York. Massachusetts, in its towns and in its Legislature, unceasingly combated the condition as well as the sale of slaves. There was no jealousy among one another in the strife
Plymouth, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 24
ed to many a pledge of relenting; and his plausible professions hushed the people into silence. The glorious spirit of liberty is vanquished and left without hope but in a miracle, said desponding patriots. I confess, said Samuel Adams, we have, as Wolfe expressed it, a choice of difficulties. Too many flatter themselves that their pusillanimity is true prudence; but in perilous times like these, I cannot conceive of prudence without fortitude. Compare Samuel Adams to James Warren of Plymouth, 25 March, 1771. He persever- Chap. XLVII.} 1771. June. ed; but John Adams retired from the service of the people, and devoting himself to his profession, John Adams: Works, II. 260, 301, 302. for a time ceased even to employ his pen in their defence. John Adams: Diary, June 22, 1771. Otis who had returned to the Legislature, disordered in mind, and jealous of his declining influence, did but impede the public cause. In Hancock, also, vanity so mingled with patriotism, that the Gov
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