hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Francis Bernard 453 39 Browse Search
T. Hutchinson 446 0 Browse Search
Samuel Adams 378 0 Browse Search
Thomas Hutchinson 283 3 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 260 0 Browse Search
Thomas Gage 256 0 Browse Search
Due Choiseul 220 2 Browse Search
George Grenville 206 0 Browse Search
William Samuel Johnson 188 2 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 178 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition.. Search the whole document.

Found 453 total hits in 131 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Chapter 28: The British aristocracy reduce their own taxes—defeat of Chatham's Administration by the Mosaic Opposition. January—March, 1767. The day after Townshend braved his colleagues Chap. Xxviii} 1767. Jan. the Legislature of Massachusetts convened. Hutchinson, having received his compensation as a sufferer by the riots, restrained his ambition no longer, and took a seat in the Council as though it of right belonged to the Lieutenant Governor. Bernard to Secretary of StatJan. the Legislature of Massachusetts convened. Hutchinson, having received his compensation as a sufferer by the riots, restrained his ambition no longer, and took a seat in the Council as though it of right belonged to the Lieutenant Governor. Bernard to Secretary of State, 7 Feb. 1767, and 21 Feb. 1767. The House resented the lust of power, manifested by his intrusion into an elective body of which he had not been chosen a member. Answer of the House, 31 Jan. 1767, in Bradford, 104; and Letter from the House to Dennys De Berdt, 16 March, 1767 The Council, by a unanimous vote, denied his pretensions. The language of the Charter was too explicit to admit of a doubt; Opinion of the Attorney General in England, cited in a Minute relative to Massachusetts Bay
January 2nd (search for this): chapter 5
r the days. Spain was resolved not to pay the Manilla ransom, was planning how to drive the English from the Chap Xxviii} 1767. Feb. Falkland Islands, and called on France to prepare to go to war in two years; for Spain said Grimaldi, cannot longer postpone inflicting chastisement on English insolence. The Marquis de Grimaldi to Prince Masserano, 20 Jan. 1767; De Guerchy at London to Choiseul, 12 Feb. 1767; D'Ossun at Madrid to Choiseul, 24 Jan. 1767. Compare Choiseul to De Guerchy of 2 Jan., and Choiseul to D'Ossun, 27 Jan. 1767. This is the rhodomontade of a Don Quixote, said the French Minister, and Choiseul kept the guidance of affairs in his own hand, and for the time was resolved not to disturb the peace. Executive moderation might still have saved England from a conflict. Undismayed by the disorder in the cabinet, the ill health of Chatham, the factions in a corrupt Parliament, or the unpromising aspect of foreign relations, and impressed with the necessity of giving
ealousy every measure that Chap. Xxviii} 1767. Feb. could imply their consent to British taxation. 7; Chat. Corr. III. 193; Shelburne to Chatham, Feb. in Chat. Corr. III. 186. and between his opini drive the English from the Chap Xxviii} 1767. Feb. Falkland Islands, and called on France to prepacountry being thus derived Chap. Xxviii} 1767. Feb. from an income which had chiefly been squandere head of its boundary Com- Chap. Xxviii} 1767. Feb. mission. Shelburne to Bernard, 11 Dec. 1766; shared in the licentious- Chap. Xxviii} 1767. Feb. ness of opinion, which he thought was infusing k, at the instigation of a Chap. Xxviii} 1767. Feb. person much connected Shelburne to Chatham, en the expense, and charge Chap. Xxviii} 1767. Feb. upon the Colonies the whole of what should remathat its authority must be Chap. Xxviii} 1767. Feb. maintained. Garth to the Committee of South ndred and eighty-eight for Chap. Xxviii} 1767. Feb. the Ministry. But not one of those who planned[1 more...]
February 9th (search for this): chapter 5
Committee of S. C., 12 March, 1767. The reasonable request provoked universal dislike; Grenville and his friends appealed to it as fresh evidence, that nothing would give satisfaction to the Colonists, but a repeal of all restrictions on trade, and freedom from all subordination and dependence. Besides; Townshend, whom Chatham had thrice Chatham to Grafton, 7 Dec. 1766, Ms.; Chatham to Grafton, 23 Jan. 1767. This letter is printed in the Chat. Corr. III. 200, with the erroneous date of Feb. 9. The third letter of Chatham to Grafton, in which he calls C. Townshend incurable, is a letter really dated 9 Feb. 1767. See Grafton's Autobiography for all three. denounced to Grafton as incurable, was more and more inclining to the same views, and in giving them effect, exercised over Grafton the superiority, which intellectual vigor and indefatigable activity are sure to win over selfindulgent indolence and sluggish, well-intentioned dulness. At this critical conjuncture, when nothin
February 18th (search for this): chapter 5
which intellectual vigor and indefatigable activity are sure to win over selfindulgent indolence and sluggish, well-intentioned dulness. At this critical conjuncture, when nothing but Chatham's presence could restore activity to the Administration, and draw Parliament from its Lethargy, De Guerchy to Choiseul, 3 Feb. 1767. the gout had returned upon him at Marlborough on his way to London. Chatham to Shelburne, 16 Feb. 1767, Marlborough. But business would not wait. On the eighteenth of February, there appeared in the account of the Extraordinaries, a large and unusual expenditure on the continent of America. Grenville advised to lessen the expense, and charge Chap. Xxviii} 1767. Feb. upon the Colonies the whole of what should remain. There was a general agreement, that America ought to alleviate the burdens of England. Every speaker of the Opposition directly inveighed against Chatham, whom no one rose to defend. Rigby, stinging the self-love of the Ministers, reproac
February 27th (search for this): chapter 5
Bedford and of Rockingham, men the most imbittered against each other by former contests, and the most opposite in character and tendencies, were ready to combine to aim a deadly blow at the existing Ministry, whatever might be the consequence of its destruction. Compare Grenville in his Diary, Papers, IV. 214. During the war, and ever since, the land-tax had been at the nominal rate of four shillings in the pound, in reality at but about nine pence in the pound. On Friday, the twenty-seventh of February, Even in Grenville's Diary dates can be wrong. Grenville Papers, IV. 211; King to Conway, 27 Feb. 1767, in Albemarle, II. 430; Grafton to Chatham, 28 Feb.; King to Chatham, 3 March. Dowdeswell, the leader of the Rockingham party, regardless of his own policy when in the treasury and his knowledge of the public wants, proposed a reduction in the land tax, nominally of a shilling, but really of only about nine farthings in the pound. Grenville, with more consistency, supported
February 28th (search for this): chapter 5
a deadly blow at the existing Ministry, whatever might be the consequence of its destruction. Compare Grenville in his Diary, Papers, IV. 214. During the war, and ever since, the land-tax had been at the nominal rate of four shillings in the pound, in reality at but about nine pence in the pound. On Friday, the twenty-seventh of February, Even in Grenville's Diary dates can be wrong. Grenville Papers, IV. 211; King to Conway, 27 Feb. 1767, in Albemarle, II. 430; Grafton to Chatham, 28 Feb.; King to Chatham, 3 March. Dowdeswell, the leader of the Rockingham party, regardless of his own policy when in the treasury and his knowledge of the public wants, proposed a reduction in the land tax, nominally of a shilling, but really of only about nine farthings in the pound. Grenville, with more consistency, supported Guerchy to Choiseul, 3 March, 1767. the proposal, which, it was generally thought, must bring in its train a tax on the Colonies. Letter from London, of 4 April 17
March 3rd (search for this): chapter 5
ting Ministry, whatever might be the consequence of its destruction. Compare Grenville in his Diary, Papers, IV. 214. During the war, and ever since, the land-tax had been at the nominal rate of four shillings in the pound, in reality at but about nine pence in the pound. On Friday, the twenty-seventh of February, Even in Grenville's Diary dates can be wrong. Grenville Papers, IV. 211; King to Conway, 27 Feb. 1767, in Albemarle, II. 430; Grafton to Chatham, 28 Feb.; King to Chatham, 3 March. Dowdeswell, the leader of the Rockingham party, regardless of his own policy when in the treasury and his knowledge of the public wants, proposed a reduction in the land tax, nominally of a shilling, but really of only about nine farthings in the pound. Grenville, with more consistency, supported Guerchy to Choiseul, 3 March, 1767. the proposal, which, it was generally thought, must bring in its train a tax on the Colonies. Letter from London, of 4 April 1767, in Boston Gazette, 637
mmend? asked the King, through Grafton; and no other could be named. This was a new humiliation. Chatham saw his adversary exposed defenceless to his will; and the shaft which his aged and enfeebled hand tremulously hurled at him, fell harmless at his own feet. He could endure no more. We cannot remain in office together; said he of Townshend, and he asked the Duke of Grafton himself to call the next Council at his own house. Chatham to Grafton, Wednesday, 11 March 1767, in Grafton's Autobiography. The accumulation of grief destroyed what little of health remained to him; he withdrew from business and became invisible even to Camden and to Grafton. Here, in fact, Chatham's Administration was at an end. Grafton's own statement in his Autobiography. Transmitting to his substitute every question of domestic, foreign and colonial policy unsettled, the British Agamemnon retired to his tent, leaving the subordinate chiefs to quarrel for the direction. Chap. XXIX.} 1766. Dec.
June, 1763 AD (search for this): chapter 5
Assembly, and other things necessary to the Settlement of Canada: indorsed, Relative to the Present State of Quebec, 17 May, 1767. The paper seems to have been drafted by an Under Secretary for Lord Shelburne's consideration; perhaps by L. Macleane. and Council. But the more Shelburne showed his good disposition towards America, the more the Court spoke of him as an enemy. Grafton's Autobiography. The King had long been persuaded Compare Secretary Calvert to Lieut. Gov. Sharpe, June, 1763. that the Colonies shared in the licentious- Chap. Xxviii} 1767. Feb. ness of opinion, which he thought was infusing itself into all orders of men; and that a due obedience and submission to law must in all cases go before the removal of grievances. Otherwise, said he, we shall soon be no better than the savages. King to Conway, 20 Sept. 1766, 8 minutes past 9 P. M. He was now accustomed to talk a great deal about America; Bristol to Chatham, 9 Feb. 1767; Chat. Corr. III. 199. and
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...