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France (France) (search for this): chapter 5
nd, and yet was as a barren fruit-tree, which, though fair to the eye, only cumbers the earth, and spreads a noxious shade. Farmer's Letters. Shelburne was aware also, that if the Americans should be tempted to resist in the last instance, France and Spain Shelburne to Chatham, 16 Feb. 1767; in Chat. Corr. III. 209. would no longer defer breaking the peace of which they began to number the days. Spain was resolved not to pay the Manilla ransom, was planning how to drive the English from the Chap Xxviii} 1767. Feb. Falkland Islands, and called on France to prepare to go to war in two years; for Spain said Grimaldi, cannot longer postpone inflicting chastisement on English insolence. The Marquis de Grimaldi to Prince Masserano, 20 Jan. 1767; De Guerchy at London to Choiseul, 12 Feb. 1767; D'Ossun at Madrid to Choiseul, 24 Jan. 1767. Compare Choiseul to De Guerchy of 2 Jan., and Choiseul to D'Ossun, 27 Jan. 1767. This is the rhodomontade of a Don Quixote, said the French
Marlboro, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
as incurable, was more and more inclining to the same views, and in giving them effect, exercised over Grafton the superiority, which intellectual vigor and indefatigable activity are sure to win over selfindulgent indolence and sluggish, well-intentioned dulness. At this critical conjuncture, when nothing but Chatham's presence could restore activity to the Administration, and draw Parliament from its Lethargy, De Guerchy to Choiseul, 3 Feb. 1767. the gout had returned upon him at Marlborough on his way to London. Chatham to Shelburne, 16 Feb. 1767, Marlborough. But business would not wait. On the eighteenth of February, there appeared in the account of the Extraordinaries, a large and unusual expenditure on the continent of America. Grenville advised to lessen the expense, and charge Chap. Xxviii} 1767. Feb. upon the Colonies the whole of what should remain. There was a general agreement, that America ought to alleviate the burdens of England. Every speaker of the Op
Massachusetts Bay (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
of State, 7 Feb. 1767, and 21 Feb. 1767. The House resented the lust of power, manifested by his intrusion into an elective body of which he had not been chosen a member. Answer of the House, 31 Jan. 1767, in Bradford, 104; and Letter from the House to Dennys De Berdt, 16 March, 1767 The Council, by a unanimous vote, denied his pretensions. The language of the Charter was too explicit to admit of a doubt; Opinion of the Attorney General in England, cited in a Minute relative to Massachusetts Bay, 1767. yet Bernard, as the accomplice of Hutchinson, urged the interposition of the central Government. Men feared more and more the system which Feb Paxton had gone to mature. With unshaken confidence in Hawley, Otis, and Samuel Adams, Freeborn American, in Boston Gazette, 9 March, 1767. they scanned with increasing jealousy every measure that Chap. Xxviii} 1767. Feb. could imply their consent to British taxation. They inquired if more troops were expected; and when the Gov
Chatham (Canada) (search for this): chapter 5
s well as secure the public magazines. For Chatham, who wished to keep the affections of the col 7, 1767; Chat. Corr. III. 193; Shelburne to Chatham, Feb. in Chat. Corr. III. 186. and between hed to purposes of oppression. Shelburne to Chatham, 6 Feb. 1767, and 16 Feb. 1767; Chat. Corr. alk a great deal about America; Bristol to Chatham, 9 Feb. 1767; Chat. Corr. III. 199. and he tby the public to be at stake; Shelburne to Chatham, 6 Feb. 1767; Chat. Corr. III. 207, 209. andesides; Townshend, whom Chatham had thrice Chatham to Grafton, 7 Dec. 1766, Ms.; Chatham to GrafChatham to Grafton, 23 Jan. 1767. This letter is printed in the Chat. Corr. III. 200, with the erroneous date ofWalpole's Memoirs II. 417; Compare Grafton to Chatham, 13 March 1767; Chat. Corr. III. 233. None h Feb. 1767, in Albemarle, II. 430; Grafton to Chatham, 28 Feb.; King to Chatham, 3 March. Dowdeswelcould be named. This was a new humiliation. Chatham saw his adversary exposed defenceless to his [16 more...]
Bristol (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 5
Compare Secretary Calvert to Lieut. Gov. Sharpe, June, 1763. that the Colonies shared in the licentious- Chap. Xxviii} 1767. Feb. ness of opinion, which he thought was infusing itself into all orders of men; and that a due obedience and submission to law must in all cases go before the removal of grievances. Otherwise, said he, we shall soon be no better than the savages. King to Conway, 20 Sept. 1766, 8 minutes past 9 P. M. He was now accustomed to talk a great deal about America; Bristol to Chatham, 9 Feb. 1767; Chat. Corr. III. 199. and he told Shelburne plainly that the Billeting Act should be enforced; though he declined to suggest the mode. Besides; the dependence of the Colonies was believed by the public to be at stake; Shelburne to Chatham, 6 Feb. 1767; Chat. Corr. III. 207, 209. and New-York underwent the imputation of rebellion. Shelburne to Chatham, Feb. 1767; Chat. Corr. III. 187. The difficulties that beset Shelburne were infinitely increased by th
North America (search for this): chapter 5
disturb the peace. Executive moderation might still have saved England from a conflict. Undismayed by the disorder in the cabinet, the ill health of Chatham, the factions in a corrupt Parliament, or the unpromising aspect of foreign relations, and impressed with the necessity of giving up trifles that created uneasiness, Richard Jackson to Hutchinson, Jan. 1767. Shelburne proceeded diligently to make himself master of each American Paper indorsed, Things to be considered of in North America, in Lansdowne House Mss. Compare the Justice and Policy of the late Act of Parliament for Quebec, 1774, 17. question, and to prepare its solution. The subject of the greatest consequence was the forming an American fund. To this end, without exercising rigor in respect to quit-rents long due, he proposed to break up the system of forestalling lands by speculators, to require that the engrossing proprietors should fulfil the conditions of their grants, and to make all future grants on
Rockingham, N. C. (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
ght for Chap. Xxviii} 1767. Feb. the Ministry. But not one of those who planned this impolitic act, derived from it any advantage. The good sense of the country condemned it; the city dreaded the wound given to public credit; Grenville, who joyfully accepted the congratulations of the country gentlemen, deceived himself in expecting a junction with Rockingham, and had in the King an inflexible enemy. Compare Grenville's Diary in the Grenville Papers, IV. 212, with Sir Geo. Saville to Rockingham in Albemarle's Rockingham, II. 41. The ancient whig Connection, which had ruled England so long and still claimed to represent the party of Liberty, by creating an apparent excuse for Townshend's system of American taxes, only doomed itself more surely to a fruitless opposition. For so small a benefit, as a reduction on but one year's rental of nine farthings in the pound, and for a barren parliamentary triumph, it compromised its principles, and risked a continent. This was the first
Ticonderoga (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
Assembly. Gage to Shelburne, 20 Feb. 1767, and accompanying papers; Prior Documents, 130, &c. The Crown Officers in the Colonies busied themselves with schemes to check every aspiration after Independence. Carlton, the able Governor of Canada, advised against granting legislative immunities to its people. Compare Carlton to Shelburne, 20 Jan. 1768. The more he considered the state of affairs, the more he was convinced, that it was indispensably necessary to keep Crown Point and Ticonderoga in good repair; to have a citadel and place of Chap. Xxviii} 1767. Feb. arms in New-York, as well as a citadel in Quebec; and to link the two provinces so strongly together, that on the commencement of an outbreak, ten or fifteen thousand men could be moved without delay from the one to the other, or to any part of the continent. No pains, no address, no expense, he insisted, Carlton to Gage, Quebec, 15 Feb. 1766; compare Shelburne to the Board of Trade, 5 Oct. 1767. would be too gr
Grafton, W. Va. (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 5
s America, the more the Court spoke of him as an enemy. Grafton's Autobiography. The King had long been persuaded Compahend incurable, is a letter really dated 9 Feb. 1767. See Grafton's Autobiography for all three. denounced to Grafton as inc the same views, and in giving them effect, exercised over Grafton the superiority, which intellectual vigor and indefatigabl7. March Chatham next recommend? asked the King, through Grafton; and no other could be named. This was a new humiliation.e together; said he of Townshend, and he asked the Duke of Grafton himself to call the next Council at his own house. Chatham to Grafton, Wednesday, 11 March 1767, in Grafton's Autobiography. The accumulation of grief destroyed what little of healw from business and became invisible even to Camden and to Grafton. Here, in fact, Chatham's Administration was at an end. Grafton's own statement in his Autobiography. Transmitting to his substitute every question of domestic, foreign and colo
Quebec (Canada) (search for this): chapter 5
eroga in good repair; to have a citadel and place of Chap. Xxviii} 1767. Feb. arms in New-York, as well as a citadel in Quebec; and to link the two provinces so strongly together, that on the commencement of an outbreak, ten or fifteen thousand menhe one to the other, or to any part of the continent. No pains, no address, no expense, he insisted, Carlton to Gage, Quebec, 15 Feb. 1766; compare Shelburne to the Board of Trade, 5 Oct. 1767. would be too great for the object, which would divid considered of in North America, in Lansdowne House Mss. Compare the Justice and Policy of the late Act of Parliament for Quebec, 1774, 17. question, and to prepare its solution. The subject of the greatest consequence was the forming an American ppointment of an Assembly, and other things necessary to the Settlement of Canada: indorsed, Relative to the Present State of Quebec, 17 May, 1767. The paper seems to have been drafted by an Under Secretary for Lord Shelburne's consideration; perha
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