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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition.. Search the whole document.

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New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
mselves united in one representative body, and deriving from that union a power that was to be felt throughout the civilized world. Then arose the question, as to the method of voting. There were fifty-five members; each colony having sent as many as it pleased. Henry, a repre- Chap. XI.} 1774. Sept. sentative of the largest state, intimated that it would be unjust for a little colony to weigh as much in the councils of America as a great one. A little colony, observed Sullivan of New Hampshire, has its all at stake as well as a great one. John Adams admitted that the vote by colonies was unequal, yet that an opposite course would lead to perplexing controversy, for there were no authentic records of the numbers of the people, or the value of their trade. Reserving the subject for further consideration the congress adjourned. The discussion led the members to exaggerate the population of their respective colonies; and the aggregate of the estimates was made to exceed three
Patrick Henry (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
, would have had them use the State House, but the carpenters of Philadelphia offered their plain but spacious hall; and from respect for the mechanics, it was accepted by a great majority. The names of the members were then called over, and Patrick Henry, Washington, Richard Henry Lee, Samuel Adams, John Adams, Jay, Gadsden, John Rutledge of South Carolina, the aged Hopkins of Rhode Island, and others, representing eleven colonies, answered to the call. Peyton Randolph, late speaker of the athe next day's session, a long and deep silence prevailed. Every one feared the responsibility of a decision which was to influence permanently the relations of independent states. The voice of Virginia was waited for, and was heard through Patrick Henry. Making a recital of the wrongs inflicted on the colonies by acts of parliament, he declared that all government was dissolved; that they were reduced Chap. XI.} 1774. Sept. to a state of nature; that the congress then assembled was but
North America (search for this): chapter 12
but faintly expressed their spirit, members from all the colonies declared their sympathy with their suffering countrymen in Massachusetts, most thoroughly approved the wisdom and fortitude with which opposition to ministerial measures had hitherto been conducted, and earnestly recommended perseverance according to the resolutions of the county of Suffolk. Knowing that a new parliament must soon be chosen, they ex- Chap. XI.} 1774. Sept. pressed their trust that the united efforts of North America would carry such conviction to the British nation of the unjust and ruinous policy of the present administration, as quickly to introduce better men and wiser measures. To this end they ordered their own resolutions with the communications from Suffolk county to be printed. But their appeal to the electors of Britain was anticipated. The inflexible king, weighing in advance the possible influence of the American congress, overruled Lord North, and on the last day of September sudden
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 12
of sending envoys to dangle at the heels of a minister, and undergo the scorn of parliament. Yet there was great diversity of opinions respecting the proper modes of resisting the aggressions of the mother country, and conciliation was the ardent wish of all. The South Carolinians greeted the delegates of Massachusetts as the envoys of freedom herself; and the Virginians equalled or surpassed their colleagues in resoluteness and spirit; but all united in desiring to promote the union of Great Britain and the colonies on a constitutional foundation. On Monday the fifth day of September, the mem- Chap. XI.} 1774. Sept. bers of congress, meeting at Smith's tavern, moved in a body to select the place for their deliberations. Galloway, the speaker of Pennsylvania, would have had them use the State House, but the carpenters of Philadelphia offered their plain but spacious hall; and from respect for the mechanics, it was accepted by a great majority. The names of the members were then
Middlesex Village (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
uel Adams, wrote Galloway, though by no means remarkable for brilliant abilities, is equal to most men in popular intrigue, and the management of a faction. He eats little, drinks little, sleeps little, and thinks much, and is most decisive and indefatigable in the pursuit of his objects. He was the man who, by his superior application managed at once the faction in congress at Philadelphia, and the factions in New England. One express had brought from Massachusetts the proceedings of Middlesex; another having now arrived, on Saturday, the seventeenth of September, the delegates of Massachusetts laid before congress the address of the Suffolk county convention to Gage, on his seizure of the provincial stock of powder and his hostile occupation of the only approach to Boston by land; and the resolutions of the same convention which declared that no obedience was due to the acts of parliament affecting their colony. As the papers were read, expressions of esteem, love and admira
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
pacious hall; and from respect for the mechanics, it was accepted by a great majority. The names of the members were then called over, and Patrick Henry, Washington, Richard Henry Lee, Samuel Adams, John Adams, Jay, Gadsden, John Rutledge of South Carolina, the aged Hopkins of Rhode Island, and others, representing eleven colonies, answered to the call. Peyton Randolph, late speaker of the assembly of Virginia, was nominated president by Lynch of Carolina, and was unanimously chosen. The body has effaced the boundaries of the several colonies; the distinctions between Virginians, Pennsylvanians, New Yorkers, and New Englanders are no more. I am not a Virginian, but an American. A compound of numbers and property, said Lynch, of South Carolina, should determine the weight of the colonies. But he admitted that such a rule could not then be settled. In the same spirit spoke the elder Rutledge. We have, said he, no legal authority; and obedience to the measures we adopt will only f
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
th Carolinians greeted the delegates of Massachusetts as the envoys of freedom herself; and the Virginians equalled or surpassed their colleagues in resoluteness and spirit; but all united in desiring to promote the union of Great Britain and the colonies on a constitutional foundation. On Monday the fifth day of September, the mem- Chap. XI.} 1774. Sept. bers of congress, meeting at Smith's tavern, moved in a body to select the place for their deliberations. Galloway, the speaker of Pennsylvania, would have had them use the State House, but the carpenters of Philadelphia offered their plain but spacious hall; and from respect for the mechanics, it was accepted by a great majority. The names of the members were then called over, and Patrick Henry, Washington, Richard Henry Lee, Samuel Adams, John Adams, Jay, Gadsden, John Rutledge of South Carolina, the aged Hopkins of Rhode Island, and others, representing eleven colonies, answered to the call. Peyton Randolph, late speaker of
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 12
and Gadsden; and by their side Presbyterians and Congregationalists, the Livingstons, Sherman, Samuel Adams, John Adams, and others of Chap. XI.} 1774. Sept. New England, who believed that a rude soldiery were then infesting the dwellings and taking the lives of their friends. When the psalm for the day was read, Heaven itself pectedly burst into an extempore prayer for America, for the congress, for Massachusetts, and especially for Boston, with the earnestness of the best divines of New England. The congress that day appointed one committee on the rights of the colonies, and another on the British statutes affecting their manufactures and trade. Thble in the pursuit of his objects. He was the man who, by his superior application managed at once the faction in congress at Philadelphia, and the factions in New England. One express had brought from Massachusetts the proceedings of Middlesex; another having now arrived, on Saturday, the seventeenth of September, the delegate
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
e new establishment in Massachusetts ought to be acknowledged, but advocated allowing to parliament the regulation of trade upon principles of necessity, and the mutual interest of both countries. A right of regulating trade, said Gadsden, true to the principle of 1765, is a right of legislation, and a right of legislation in one case is a right in all; and he denied the claim with peremptory energy. Amidst such varying opinions and theories, the congress, increased by delegates from North Carolina, and intent upon securing absolute unanimity, was moving with great deliberation, and Galloway hoped Chap. XI.} 1774. Sept. the two parties would remain on an equal balance. But in that body there was a man who knew how to bring the enthusiasm of the people into connection with its representatives. Samuel Adams, wrote Galloway, though by no means remarkable for brilliant abilities, is equal to most men in popular intrigue, and the management of a faction. He eats little, drinks litt
Suffolk County (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 12
ir colony. As the papers were read, expressions of esteem, love and admiration broke forth in generous and manly eloquence. In language which but faintly expressed their spirit, members from all the colonies declared their sympathy with their suffering countrymen in Massachusetts, most thoroughly approved the wisdom and fortitude with which opposition to ministerial measures had hitherto been conducted, and earnestly recommended perseverance according to the resolutions of the county of Suffolk. Knowing that a new parliament must soon be chosen, they ex- Chap. XI.} 1774. Sept. pressed their trust that the united efforts of North America would carry such conviction to the British nation of the unjust and ruinous policy of the present administration, as quickly to introduce better men and wiser measures. To this end they ordered their own resolutions with the communications from Suffolk county to be printed. But their appeal to the electors of Britain was anticipated. The in
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