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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8. Search the whole document.

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Charles Lee (search for this): chapter 1
o Massachusetts, was Artemas Ward. Notwithstanding his ill health, he answered: I always have been, and am still ready to devote my life in attempting to deliver my native country. The American people with ingenuous confidence assumed that Charles Lee,—the son of an English officer, trained up from boyhood for the army,—was, as he represented himself, well versed in the science of war, familiar with active service in America, Portugal, Poland, and Turkey, and altogether a soldier of consumm, by self-sacrifice, he might unbar the gates of light for mankind. On Sunday, the twenty fifth, all New York was in motion. Tryon, the royal governor, who had arrived the day before, was to land from the harbor; and Washington, accompanied by Lee and Schuyler, under the escort of the Philadelphia Light Horse, was known to have reached Newark. As the colony of New York had been enjoined by the general congress to respect the king's government, the governor and the general were both entitle
Horatio Gates (search for this): chapter 1
rate. His bustling manner and adventurous life had made his village tavern the resort of the patriots of his neighborhood; its keeper their military oracle; but his fame rested on deeds of personal prowess rather than on concerted action; Chap. XLI.} 1775. June. and at fifty seven he was too old to be taken from his farm and his stand to command armies, even if he had not always wanted superintending vigilance, controlling energy, and the faculty of combination. Next to those came Horatio Gates, as adjutant general with the rank of brigadier. His experience adapted him for good service in bringing the army into order; but he was shallow in his natural endowments and in his military culture, yet restless for a higher place, for which he did not possess either the requisite genius for command, or firmness of mind. The continent took up arms, with only one general officer, who drew to himself the trust and love of the country, with not one of the five next below him fit to suc
destruction. You have begun to burn our towns, and murder our people. Look upon your hands, they are stained with the blood of your relations! You and I were long friends; you are now my enemy, and I am yours. But Franklin did not attempt to overrule the opinions or defy the scruples of his colleagues, and, after earnest debates, congress adopted the proposal of Jay to petition the king once more. The second petition to the king was drafted by Dickinson, and in these words put forward Duane's proposal for a negotiation to be preceded by a truce: We beseech your majesty to direct some mode by Chap. XLI.} 1775. July. which the united applications of your faithful colonists to the throne, in pursuance of their common councils, may be improved into a happy and permanent reconciliation; and that, in the mean time, measures may be taken for preventing the further destruction of the lives of your majesty's subjects, and that such statutes as more immediately distress any of your maj
Trumbull Washington (search for this): chapter 1
the man who, in the probable event of Ward's early resignation, was placed next in command to Washington. New York had been asked to propose the third major general; she had more than one citizen e no trouble. On the twenty-sixth, the provincial congress of New York, in their address to Washington, from whose abilities and virtue they were taught to expect security and peace, declared an acn we Chap. XLI.} 1775. June. assumed the soldier, we did not lay aside the citizen, answered Washington for himself and his colleagues; but having once drawn the sword, he postponed the thought of pce had been deferred; no more than four barrels of powder could be found in the city. While Washington was borne toward Cambridge on the affectionate confidence of the people, congress, which had aing themselves towards the payment of the national debt. From the complacency engendered by delusive confidence, congress was recalled to the necessities of the moment by a letter from Washington.
William Franklin (search for this): chapter 1
t before. So firm a declaration should have been followed by assuming powers of government, opening the ports to every nation, holding the king's officers as hostages and modelling a general constitution. Such was the counsel of John Adams. Franklin also knew that there was no longer a time to negotiate or entreat. In the ashes of Charlestown, along the trenches of Bunker Hill, he saw the footsteps of a revolution that could not be turned back; and to Strahan, the go between through whom hch has doomed my country to destruction. You have begun to burn our towns, and murder our people. Look upon your hands, they are stained with the blood of your relations! You and I were long friends; you are now my enemy, and I am yours. But Franklin did not attempt to overrule the opinions or defy the scruples of his colleagues, and, after earnest debates, congress adopted the proposal of Jay to petition the king once more. The second petition to the king was drafted by Dickinson, and in
Joseph Yorke (search for this): chapter 1
y native country. The American people with ingenuous confidence assumed that Charles Lee,—the son of an English officer, trained up from boyhood for the army,—was, as he represented himself, well versed in the science of war, familiar with active service in America, Portugal, Poland, and Turkey, and altogether a soldier of consummate ability, who had joined their cause from the purest impulses of a generous nature. In England he was better understood. From what I know of him, wrote Sir Joseph Yorke, then British minister at the Hague, he is the worst present which could be made to any army. He left the standard of his king, because he saw no Chap. XLI.} 1775. June 17. chance of being provided for at home, and, as an adventurer, sought employment in any part of the world. Venerating England all the while, and holding it wretchedness itself not to be able to herd with the class of men to which he had been accustomed from his infancy, he was continually craving intimate relations
lf-sacrifice, he might unbar the gates of light for mankind. On Sunday, the twenty fifth, all New York was in motion. Tryon, the royal governor, who had arrived the day before, was to land from the harbor; and Washington, accompanied by Lee and ll ages and both sexes, bent their eyes on him from the housetops, the windows, and the streets. Night had fallen before Tryon landed. Met by a company which he himself had commissioned, and by a few of the magistrates in military costume, he was y owned that the province would fall behind none in opposition to the king and parliament. Amazed and dejected at heart, Tryon masked his designs under an air of unconcern, and overflowed with bland professions. Washington, who instantly penetratehuyler, lulled by words of mildness which concealed the most wary and malignant activity, soon reported confidently, that Tryon would create no trouble. On the twenty-sixth, the provincial congress of New York, in their address to Washington, fro
1: The continental congress in midsummer, 1775. June 17—July, 1775. idle refugees in Boston, and even candid British Chap. XLI.} 1775. June 17. officers, condemned Howe's attack on the New fifth regiment suffered most; the Chap. XLI.} 1775. June 17. eighteenth and the fifty ninth, whichard of his king, because he saw no Chap. XLI.} 1775. June 17. chance of being provided for at home,merous eccentricities were neither Chap. XLI.} 1775. June 17. exaggerations nor caricatures of any ovince makes him a fit subject for Chap. XLI.} 1775. June 17. an important trust; but has he strongs rather than on concerted action; Chap. XLI.} 1775. June. and at fifty seven he was too old to ben open carriage by a pair of white Chap. XLI.} 1775. June. horses, he was escorted into the city bcome once more a citizen. When we Chap. XLI.} 1775. June. assumed the soldier, we did not lay asiour majesty to direct some mode by Chap. XLI.} 1775. July. which the united applications of your fa[5 more...]
Amazed and dejected at heart, Tryon masked his designs under an air of unconcern, and overflowed with bland professions. Washington, who instantly penetrated his insincerity, and had no scruple about the propriety of seizing him, directed Schuyler to keep a watchful eye on his movements, and wrote a warning to congress; but Schuyler, lulled by words of mildness which concealed the most wary and malignant activity, soon reported confidently, that Tryon would create no trouble. On the twenty-sixth, the provincial congress of New York, in their address to Washington, from whose abilities and virtue they were taught to expect security and peace, declared an accommodation with the mother country to be the fondest wish of each American soul, in the fullest assurance that, upon such an accommodation, he would cheerfully resign his trust, and become once more a citizen. When we Chap. XLI.} 1775. June. assumed the soldier, we did not lay aside the citizen, answered Washington for hims
July 12th (search for this): chapter 1
s most ardently for a lasting connection with Great Britain on terms of just and equal liberty; less than which generous minds will not offer, nor brave and free ones receive. The desire for harmony was so intense, that Richard Penn, a proprietary of Pennsylvania and recently its governor, a most loyal Englishman, bound by the strongest motives of affection and interest to avert American independence, was selected to bear the second petition to the throne. He assumed the trust with alacrity, and on the twelfth of July embarked on his mission. The hope of success grew out of the readiness of the Americans, on the condition of exemption from parliamentary taxation, to bear the restraints on their trade; or, as an alternative, to purchase a freedom of trade like that of Scotland, by taxing themselves towards the payment of the national debt. From the complacency engendered by delusive confidence, congress was recalled to the necessities of the moment by a letter from Washington.
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