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Quebec (Canada) (search for this): chapter 14
Chapter 54: The siege of Quebec. November—December, 1775. The day before Montgomery entd some small vessels in the port to descend to Quebec. He was detained in the river for several dayrois Rivieres, he arrived on the nineteenth at Quebec, where his presence diffused joy and confidencs pride, and his firmness were guarantees that Quebec would be pertinaciously defended. Besides, heuccess of Montgomery had emboldened a party in Quebec to confess a willingness to receive him on tergarrison his conquests, and to go down against Quebec. He was deserted even by most of the Green Mof about two hundred Canadians, appeared before Quebec, in midwinter, to take the strongest fortified he had received the order of congress to hold Quebec, if it should come into his hands; should tha hope of crowning his career by the capture of Quebec. Orders were therefore given for the troops twhere your general leads; push on, brave boys; Quebec is ours! he pressed forward at double quick t[2 more...]
Montgomery (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
rs were therefore given for the troops to be ready at two o'clock of the following morning; and that they might recognise one another, each soldier wore in his cap a piece of white paper, on which some of them wrote: liberty or death. It was Montgomery's plan to alarm the garrison at once, along the whole line of their defences. Chap. LIV.} 1775. Dec. Colonel James Livingston, with less than two hundred Canadians, was to attract attention by appearing before St. John's gate, on the southwesmane, and generous rebel. Curse on his virtues, they've undone his country. The term of rebel, retorted Fox, is no certain mark of disgrace. All the great assertors of liberty, the saviors of their country, the benefactors of mankind in all ages, have been called rebels. We owe the constitution which enables us to sit in this house to a rebellion. So passed away the spirit of Montgomery, with the love of all that knew him, the grief of the nascent republic, and the eulogies of the world.
Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 14
and after their departure he found himself supported by more than three hundred regulars, three hundred and thirty Anglo-Canadian militia, five hundred and forty three French Canadians, four hundred and eighty five seamen and marines, beside a hundred to share his winter campaign. The continental congress, which was eager Chap. LIV.} 1775. Nov. for the occupation of Canada, took no seasonable care to supply the places of his men as their time of enlistment expired. On the twenty sixth, lea for musketry and a battery of two three-pounders, intercepted the passage. It was held by a party consisting of thirty Canadian and eight British militiamen under John Coffin, with nine seamen under Barnsfare, the master of a transport, as cannonie shut up within the single town of Boston, with the movements of the hero who in one campaign had conquered two thirds of Canada. I, replied North, cannot join in lamenting the death of Montgomery as a public loss. He was brave, he was able, he was
Montreal (Canada) (search for this): chapter 14
Chapter 54: The siege of Quebec. November—December, 1775. The day before Montgomery entered Montreal, Chap. LIV.} 1775 Nov. Carleton, with more than a hundred regulars and Canadians, embarked on board some small vessels in the port to descend to Quebec. He was detained in the river for several days by contrary windsed the inquisitiveness and self-direction of civil life; so that his authority depended chiefly on his personal influence and his powers of persuasion. Now that Montreal was taken and winter was come, homesickness so prevailed among them that he was left with no more than eight hundred men to garrison his conquests, and to go dows their time of enlistment expired. On the twenty sixth, leaving St. John's under the command of Marinus Willett of New York, and entrusting the government of Montreal to Wooster of Connecticut, and in the spirit of a lawgiver who was to regenerate the province, making a declaration that on his return he would call a convention
Dearborn (Michigan, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
ns withdrew from the streets, and found shelter in houses of stone, from which they could fire with better effect. It was then that Hendricks, while aiming his rifle, was shot through the heart. But the retreat of Campbell, and the certainty that the other attacks were only feints, left Carleton free to concentrate all his force against the party of Arnold. By his orders a sally was now made from Palace Gate, in the rear of the Americans, by Captain Laws, with two hundred men; they found Dearborn's company divided into two parties, each of which successively surrendered; and then the remnant of the assailants, the flower of the rebel army, was cooped up within the town. Morgan proposed that they should cut their way through their enemies; but retreat had become impracticable; and after maintaining the struggle till the last hope was gone, at ten o'clock they surrendered. Thus Greene, Meigs, Morgan, Hendricks, the hardy men who had passed the wilderness with purposes of conquest, m
Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
quests, and to go down against Quebec. He was deserted even by most of the Green Mountain Boys, who at first were disposed to share his winter campaign. The continental congress, which was eager Chap. LIV.} 1775. Nov. for the occupation of Canada, took no seasonable care to supply the places of his men as their time of enlistment expired. On the twenty sixth, leaving St. John's under the command of Marinus Willett of New York, and entrusting the government of Montreal to Wooster of Connecticut, and in the spirit of a lawgiver who was to regenerate the province, making a declaration that on his return he would call a convention of the Canadian people, Montgomery embarked on board three armed schooners with artillery and provisions and three hundred troops; and on the third day of De- Dec. cember, at Point aux Trembles, made a junction with Arnold. The famine-proof veterans, now but six hundred and seventy five in number, were paraded in front of the Catholic chapel, to hear th
Cape Diamond (Hawaii, United States) (search for this): chapter 14
fences. Chap. LIV.} 1775. Dec. Colonel James Livingston, with less than two hundred Canadians, was to attract attention by appearing before St. John's gate, on the southwest; while a company of Americans under Brown was to feign a movement on Cape Diamond, where the wall faces south by west, and from that high ground, at the proper time, were to fire a rocket, as the signal for beginning the real attacks on the lower town, under Arnold from the west and north, under Montgomery from the south ances, with cutting hail, which the eye could not endure; their constant step wore the frozen snow into little lumps of ice, so that the men were fatigued by their struggles not to fall, and they could not keep their arms dry. The signal from Cape Diamond being given more than half an hour too soon, the general with his aidede-camps, Macpherson and Burr, pushed on with the front, composed of Cheesman's company and Mott's; and more than half an hour before day they arrived at the first barrier,
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 14
f heavy metal, and a garrison of twice the number of the besiegers. Quick of perception, of a hopeful temperament, and impatient of delay, Montgomery saw at a glance his difficulties, and yet thought there was a fair prospect of success. He could not expect it from a siege, for he had no battering train; nor by investing Chap. LIV.} 1775. Dec. the place, which had provisions for eight months; there could therefore be no hope of its capture but by storm, and as the engagements of the New England men ended with the thirty first of December, the assault must be made within twenty six days. He grieved for the loss of life that might ensue, but his decision was prompt and unchanging. The works of the lower town were the weakest; these he thought it possible to carry, and then the favor of the inhabitants in the upper town, their concern for their property, the unwarlike character of the garrison, the small military ability of Carleton, offered chances of victory. The first act of
Marinus Willett (search for this): chapter 14
among them that he was left with no more than eight hundred men to garrison his conquests, and to go down against Quebec. He was deserted even by most of the Green Mountain Boys, who at first were disposed to share his winter campaign. The continental congress, which was eager Chap. LIV.} 1775. Nov. for the occupation of Canada, took no seasonable care to supply the places of his men as their time of enlistment expired. On the twenty sixth, leaving St. John's under the command of Marinus Willett of New York, and entrusting the government of Montreal to Wooster of Connecticut, and in the spirit of a lawgiver who was to regenerate the province, making a declaration that on his return he would call a convention of the Canadian people, Montgomery embarked on board three armed schooners with artillery and provisions and three hundred troops; and on the third day of De- Dec. cember, at Point aux Trembles, made a junction with Arnold. The famine-proof veterans, now but six hundred a
Quebec. November—December, 1775. The day before Montgomery entered Montreal, Chap. LIV.} 1775 Nov. Carleton, with more than a hundred regulars and Canadians, embarked on board some small vessels in the port to descend to Quebec. He was detained in the river for several days by contrary winds, and moreover he found the St. Lawrence, near the mouth of the Sorel, guarded by continental troops under Easton. On the seventeenth of November, Prescott, the brigadier who had so lately treated Allen with insolent cruelty, surrendered the flotilla of eleven sail with all the soldiers, sailors, and stores on board; but in the darkest hour of the previous night, Carleton, entering a small boat in the disguise of a peasant, had been safely paddled through the islands that lie opposite the Sorel. Touching as a fugitive at Trois Rivieres, he arrived on the nineteenth at Quebec, where his presence diffused joy and confidence among the loyal. Thus far he had shown great poverty of resources
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