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ms should be watched because his intentions might be wicked, was duped by his arts, and thought even of recommending his proposals to the consideration of congress. Besides, it was expected by many, that agents, selected from among the friends of America, would be sent from England with full powers to grant every reasonable measure of redress. It was time for Franklin to speak out, for he best Chap. LVI.} 1776. Jan. knew the folly of expecting peace from British commissioners. On the sixteenth his plan of a confederacy was called up, and he endeavored to get a day fixed for its consideration; but he was opposed by Hooper and by Dickinson, and they carried the question against him. Four days later, the Quakers of New Jersey and Pennsylvania, at a meeting of their representatives in Philadelphia, published their testimony that the setting up and putting down of kings and governments is God's peculiar prerogative. Yet the votes of congress showed a fixed determination to continue
76, was the saddest day that Chap. LVI.} 1776. Jan. ever broke on the women and children then in No that mischievous persons on Chap. LVI.} 1776. Jan. shore may not have found amusement in feeding tvantage. The world gave him Chap. LVI.} 1776. Jan. credit for an army of twenty thousand well armeil of monarchy we have added Chap. LVI.} 1776. Jan. that of hereditary succession; and as the first has protected us, say some. Chap. LVI.} 1776. Jan. She did not protect us from our enemies on our s his purpose. We may be as Chap. LVI.} 1776. Jan. effectually enslaved by the want of laws in Amehth of January, was most op- Chap. LVI.} 1776. Jan. portune; the day before, the general congress hs as a part of his majority. Chap. LVI.} 1776. Jan. When Cushing's constituents heard of his pusillhteenth of January, raised a Chap. LVI.} 1776. Jan. party of volunteers, took Sir Joseph Wright priade in the minds of European Chap. LVI.} 1776. Jan. statesmen, who would have regarded an invitatio[11 more...]
January 8th (search for this): chapter 16
e of England are presenting addresses against us. A government of our own is our natural right. Ye that love mankind, that dare oppose not only tyranny but the tyrant, stand forth! Every spot of the old world is overrun with oppression; Freedom hath been hunted round the globe; Europe regards her like a stranger; and England hath given her warning to depart:! receive the fugitive, and prepare an asylum for mankind. The publication of Common Sense, which was brought out on the eighth of January, was most op- Chap. LVI.} 1776. Jan. portune; the day before, the general congress had heard of the burning of Norfolk; on the day itself the king's speech at the opening of parliament arrived. The tyrant! said Samuel Adams; his speech breathes the most malevolent spirit; and determines my opinion of its author as a man of a wicked heart. I have heard that he is his own minister; why, then, should we cast the odium of distressing mankind upon his minions? Guilt must lie at his doo
January 11th (search for this): chapter 16
had accepted for the time the office of chief justice in Massachusetts, the council in that colony would not concur with its house of representatives in soliciting instructions from the several towns on the question of independence, pretending that such a measure would be precipitate. The convention of Maryland voted unhesitatingly to put the province in a state of defence; but moved by a sense of the mildness with which their proprietary government had been administered, on the eleventh day of January they bore their testimony to the equity of the English constitution, sanctioned no military operations but for protection, and forbade their delegates in congress to assent to any proposition for independence, foreign alliance, or confederation. Moreover Lord Drummond, who represented a large proprietary interest in New Jersey, came to Philadelphia, and exhibited a paper which, as he pretended, had been approved by each of the ministers, and which promised freedom to America in p
January 18th (search for this): chapter 16
ary preparations. In New Jersey the letters of the royal governor were intercepted; and their tenor was so malignant that Lord Stirling placed him under arrest. In Georgia the people were elated with their seeming security. Twelve months ago, said they, we were declared rebels, and yet we meet with no opposition; Britain may destroy our towns, but we can retire to the back country and tire her out. On the appearance of a small squadron in the Savannah, Joseph Habersham, on the eighteenth of January, raised a Chap. LVI.} 1776. Jan. party of volunteers, took Sir Joseph Wright prisoner, and confined him under a guard in his own house. The other crown officers either fled or were seized. After an imprisonment of more than three weeks, the governor escaped by night, went by land to Bonaventure, and was rowed through Tybee Creek to the Scarborough man-of-war. Georgia, said he, is now totally under the influence of the Carolina people; nothing but force can pave the way for the co
January 20th (search for this): chapter 16
he colonies to the world to share their commerce as an act of independence; the continental congress had interfered with the old restraints on foreign trade as little as the necessity for purchasing military stores would permit; they had moreover, with few exceptions, suspended alike importations and exportations, so that New England, for example, could not export fish to Spain, even to exchange it for powder; the impulse for a world-wide commerce came from Virginia. On Saturday, the twentieth of January, on motion of Archibald Cary, her convention gave its opinion in favor of opening the ports of the colonies to all persons willing to trade with them, Great Britain, Ireland, and the British West Indies excepted, and instructed her delegates in the general congress to use their endeavors to have such a measure adopted, so soon as exportation from North America should be permitted. That this recommendation should have been left after ten months of war to be proposed by a provincial co
rmy of twenty thousand well armed men; and yet at the moment when Howe was receiving reenforcements, he had been left with less than half that number, including the sick, those on furlough, those on command, and those who were neither properly armed nor clothed. For more than two months past, said he, I have scarcely emerged from one difficulty before I have been plunged into another: how it will end, God in his great goodness will direct; I am thankful for his protection to this time. In June of the preceding year, when Lord North communicated his proposition as the ultimatum of British justice, he would have had it received as such and would have acted accordingly; on the echo from England of the battle of Bunker Hill, he saw that every hope of accommodation was delusive: the new year brought the king's speech to parliament in November, and Washington no longer held back his opinion that independence should be declared. Those around him shared his resolution; Greene wrote to his
and fifty men. On that day free negroes stood in the ranks by the side of white men. In the beginning of the war they had entered the provincial army: the first general order, which was issued by Ward, had required a return, among other things, of the complexion of the soldiers; and black men, like others, were retained in the service after the troops were adopted by the continent. We have seen Edward Rutledge defeated in Chap. LVI} 1776. Jan. his attempt to compel their discharge; in October, the conference at the camp, with Franklin, Harrison, and Lynch, thought it proper to exclude them from the new enlistment; but Washington, at the crisis of his distress, finding that they were very much dissatisfied at being discarded, took the responsibility of reversing the decision; and referred the subject to congress. That body appointed Wythe, Samuel Adams, and Wilson, to deliberate on the question; and on the report of their able committee they voted, that the free negroes who had
efore I have been plunged into another: how it will end, God in his great goodness will direct; I am thankful for his protection to this time. In June of the preceding year, when Lord North communicated his proposition as the ultimatum of British justice, he would have had it received as such and would have acted accordingly; on the echo from England of the battle of Bunker Hill, he saw that every hope of accommodation was delusive: the new year brought the king's speech to parliament in November, and Washington no longer held back his opinion that independence should be declared. Those around him shared his resolution; Greene wrote to his friend Ward, a delegate from Rhode Island to the general congress: The interests of mankind hang upon that body of which you are a member: you stand the representative not of America only, but of the friends of liberty and the supporters of the rights of human nature in the whole world; permit me from the sincerity of my heart, ready at all times
mmittee they voted, that the free negroes who had served faithfully in the army at Cambridge, might be reenlisted therein, but no others. The right of free negroes to take part in the defence of the country having thus been definitively established by the competent tribunal, they served in the ranks of the American armies during every period of the war. The enlistments were embarrassed by the low state of Washington's military chest. He could neither pay off the old army to the last of December, when their term expired, nor give assurances for the punctual pay of the militia. At one time in January he had but about ten thousand dollars at Cambridge; and that small sum was held in reserve. It would have been good policy to have paid a large bounty and engaged recruits for the war; but this measure congress refused to warrant; and it was left to the government of Massachusetts, with the aid of the rest of New England, to keep up the numbers of the army while it remained on her soi
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