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Williamsburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
congress to propose independence, Washington at New York freely and repeatedly delivered his opinion: A reconciliation with Great Britain is impracticable and would be in the highest degree detrimental to the true interest of America; when I first took the command of the army, I abhorred the idea of independence; but I am now fully convinced that nothing else will save us. The preamble and the resolves of congress, adopted at Philadelphia on the same day with the Virginia instructions at Williamsburg, were in themselves the act of a self-determining political body. The blow which proceeded from John Adams, felled the proprietary authority in Pennsylvania and Maryland to the ground. Maryland, more happy than her neighbor, kept her ranks unbroken, for she had intrusted the direction of the revolution to a convention whose decrees were received as indisputably the voice Chap. LXV.} 1776. May. of her whole people. She had dispensed with oaths for the support of the government under
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 25
ss to propose independence, Washington at New York freely and repeatedly delivered his opinion: A reconciliation with Great Britain is impracticable and would be in the highest degree detrimental to the true interest of America; when I first took thdelegates in congress she mixed with her pledges of support to the common cause the lingering wish for a reunion with Great Britain. Meanwhile the governor was required to leave the province; and the only powers actually in being were the deputies of the people, nor truly represent the province; that among its members were men who held offices under the crown of Great Britain, and who had been dragged into compliance with most of the recommendations of congress only from the fear of being sure absolved from all allegiance to the British crown, and that all political connection between them and the state of Great Britain is, and ought to be, totally dissolved; that it is expedient forthwith to take the most effectual measures for formin
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
vote by the Chap. LXV.} 1776 June. Pennsylvania assembly on that morning, did not change his view of his obligation to resist independence. On the other hand, John Adams defended the proposed measures as objects of the most stupendous magnitude, in which the lives and liberties of millions yet unborn were intimately interested; as the consummation of a revolution, the most complete, unexpected, and remarkable, of any in the history of nations. The power of all New England, Virginia, and Georgia was put forth on the same side; and the discussion was kept up till seven in the evening. A majority of the colonies, including North Carolina, appeared to be unalterably fixed in favor of an immediate declaration of independence; but the vote on the question was postponed till Monday. On the day of rest which intervened, Keith, the British minister at the court of Vienna, obtained an audience of Joseph the Second, and afterwards of the empress Maria Theresa. The emperor referred to the
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
e. On the other hand, John Adams defended the proposed measures as objects of the most stupendous magnitude, in which the lives and liberties of millions yet unborn were intimately interested; as the consummation of a revolution, the most complete, unexpected, and remarkable, of any in the history of nations. The power of all New England, Virginia, and Georgia was put forth on the same side; and the discussion was kept up till seven in the evening. A majority of the colonies, including North Carolina, appeared to be unalterably fixed in favor of an immediate declaration of independence; but the vote on the question was postponed till Monday. On the day of rest which intervened, Keith, the British minister at the court of Vienna, obtained an audience of Joseph the Second, and afterwards of the empress Maria Theresa. The emperor referred to the proclamation which the joint sovereigns had issued, most strictly prohibiting all commerce between their subjects in the Low Countries and
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
h proceeded from John Adams, felled the proprietary authority in Pennsylvania and Maryland to the ground. Maryland, more happy than her neighes in congress, the council of safety, and the convention. In Pennsylvania, the preamble, which was published on the morning of the sixteenple. Thus was prepared the fall of the proprietary charter of Pennsylvania. Any agreement which the governor would accept could be no bettt for a convention; for it left the principle of independence in Pennsylvania to be established by a domestic political party, springing Chaberland county, asking that the instructions to the delegates of Pennsylvania might be withdrawn, was read a second time, and a committee of sfor the present, opposed to independence. The instructions of Pennsylvania, which they reported on the sixth, conceded that the revolutionibility of reconciliation, and, by their indecision, entailing on Pennsylvania years of distraction and bitter strife. At ten on the same da
France (France) (search for this): chapter 25
ailing on Pennsylvania years of distraction and bitter strife. At ten on the same day congress entered into the consideration of Richard Henry Lee's resolve, and the long debate which ensued was the most copious and the most animated ever held on the subject. The argument on the part of its opponents was sustained by Robert Livingston of New York, by Wilson, Dickinson, and Edward Rutledge. They made no objection to a confederacy, and to sending a project of a treaty by proper persons to France; but they contended that a declaration of independence would place America in the power of the British, with whom she was to negotiate; give her enemy notice to counteract her intentions before she had taken steps to carry them into execution; and expose her to ridicule in the eyes of foreign powers by prematurely attempting to bring them into an alliance. Edward Rutledge said privately, that it required the impudence of a New Englander, for them in their disjointed state to propose a treat
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 25
of the restriction on his vote by the Chap. LXV.} 1776 June. Pennsylvania assembly on that morning, did not change his view of his obligation to resist independence. On the other hand, John Adams defended the proposed measures as objects of the most stupendous magnitude, in which the lives and liberties of millions yet unborn were intimately interested; as the consummation of a revolution, the most complete, unexpected, and remarkable, of any in the history of nations. The power of all New England, Virginia, and Georgia was put forth on the same side; and the discussion was kept up till seven in the evening. A majority of the colonies, including North Carolina, appeared to be unalterably fixed in favor of an immediate declaration of independence; but the vote on the question was postponed till Monday. On the day of rest which intervened, Keith, the British minister at the court of Vienna, obtained an audience of Joseph the Second, and afterwards of the empress Maria Theresa. Th
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
pted at Philadelphia on the same day with the Virginia instructions at Williamsburg, were in themselves the act of a self-determining political body. The blow which proceeded from John Adams, felled the proprietary authority in Pennsylvania and Maryland to the ground. Maryland, more happy than her neighbor, kept her ranks unbroken, for she had intrusted the direction of the revolution to a convention whose decrees were received as indisputably the voice Chap. LXV.} 1776. May. of her whole pMaryland, more happy than her neighbor, kept her ranks unbroken, for she had intrusted the direction of the revolution to a convention whose decrees were received as indisputably the voice Chap. LXV.} 1776. May. of her whole people. She had dispensed with oaths for the support of the government under the crown; but she resolved that it was not necessary to suppress totally the exercise of every kind of office derived from the king; and in her new instructions to her delegates in congress she mixed with her pledges of support to the common cause the lingering wish for a reunion with Great Britain. Meanwhile the governor was required to leave the province; and the only powers actually in being were the deputies in co
Cumberland County (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 25
by a convention; that measures had now been taken to assemble a convention of the people by men whose constituents were fighting men, and were determined to support the union of the province with the other colonies at every hazard. The members of the assembly became uneasy: in June. the first days of June no quorum appeared; on the fifth the proceedings of Virginia, directing her delegates to propose independence, were read in the house. No answer was returned; but a petition from Cumberland county, asking that the instructions to the delegates of Pennsylvania might be withdrawn, was read a second time, and a committee of seven was appointed to bring in new instructions. Of its members, among whom were Dickinson, Morris, Reed, Clymer, and one or two loyalists, all but Clymer were, for the present, opposed to independence. The instructions of Pennsylvania, which they reported on the sixth, conceded that the revolutionists were in the right; that all hopes of a reconciliation,
Richard Henry Lee (search for this): chapter 25
ietary chief-justice of the province, and to the whole house, that he and the majority of the delegates would continue to vote against independence. On that same day, and perhaps while Dickinson was speaking in the Pennsylvania assembly, Richard Henry Lee, in the name and with the special authority of Virginia, proposed: That these United Colonies are, and of right ought to be, free and independent states; that they are absolved from all allegiance to the British crown, and that all politicatically and practically; at once conceding the impossibility of reconciliation, and, by their indecision, entailing on Pennsylvania years of distraction and bitter strife. At ten on the same day congress entered into the consideration of Richard Henry Lee's resolve, and the long debate which ensued was the most copious and the most animated ever held on the subject. The argument on the part of its opponents was sustained by Robert Livingston of New York, by Wilson, Dickinson, and Edward Rut
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