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Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
Collier arrived in a sixty-four gun ship, attended by five frigates. Two vessels of war fell into his hands; the rest and all the transports fled up the river, and were burned by the Americans themselves who escaped through the woods. The British were left masters of the country east of the Penobscot. Yet, notwithstanding this signal disaster, the main result of the campaign at the north promised success to America. For want of re-enforcements, Clinton had evacuated Stony Point and Rhode Island. All New England, west of the Penobscot, was free from an enemy. In western New York the Senecas had learned that the alliance with the English secured them gifts, but not protection. On the Hudson river the Americans had recovered the use of King's ferry, and held all the country above it. The condition of Chap. X.} 1779. the American army was indeed more deplorable than ever. The winter set in early and with unwonted severity. Before the middle of December, and long before log hu
Hampton Roads (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
o prepare for confiscating the property of wealthy rebels by their execution or exile. The Virginians, since the expulsion of Lord Dunmore, free from war within their own borders, were enriching themselves by the unmolested culture of tobacco, which was exported through the Chesapeake; or, when that highway was unsafe, by a short land carriage to Albemarle Sound. On the ninth of May, Chap. X.} 1779 May 9. two thousand men under General Matthew, with fivehundred marines, anchored in Hampton Roads. The next day, after occupying Portsmouth and Norfolk, they burned every house but one in Suffolk county, and plundered or ruined all perishable property. The women and unarmed men were given over to violence and death. Parties from a sloop of war and privateers entered the principal waters of the Chesapeake, carried off or wasted stores of tobacco heaped on their banks, and burned the dwellings of the planters. Before the end of the month, the predatory expedition, having destroyed
Williamsburg (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
and unarmed men were given over to violence and death. Parties from a sloop of war and privateers entered the principal waters of the Chesapeake, carried off or wasted stores of tobacco heaped on their banks, and burned the dwellings of the planters. Before the end of the month, the predatory expedition, having destroyed more than a hundred vessels, arrived at New York with seventeen prizes, and three thousand hogsheads of tobacco. The legislature of Virginia, which was in session at Williamsburg during the invasion, retaliated by confiscating the property of British subjects within the commonwealth. An act of a previous session had directed debts due to British subjects to be paid into the loan office of the state. To meet the public exigencies, a heavy poll-tax was laid on all servants or slaves, as well as a tax payable in cereals, hemp, inspected tobacco, or the like commodities; and the issue of one million pounds in paper money was authorized. Every one who would serve at
Bluff Point (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ns: the refugees insisted that more alertness would crush the rebellion; they loved to recommend the employment of hordes of savages, and to prepare for confiscating the property of wealthy rebels by their execution or exile. The Virginians, since the expulsion of Lord Dunmore, free from war within their own borders, were enriching themselves by the unmolested culture of tobacco, which was exported through the Chesapeake; or, when that highway was unsafe, by a short land carriage to Albemarle Sound. On the ninth of May, Chap. X.} 1779 May 9. two thousand men under General Matthew, with fivehundred marines, anchored in Hampton Roads. The next day, after occupying Portsmouth and Norfolk, they burned every house but one in Suffolk county, and plundered or ruined all perishable property. The women and unarmed men were given over to violence and death. Parties from a sloop of war and privateers entered the principal waters of the Chesapeake, carried off or wasted stores of tobacco
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 11
On the afternoon of the seventh, the expedition 7. landed near Fairfield. The village, a century and a quarter old, situated near the water with a lovely country for its background, contained all that was Chap. X.} 1779. July 7. best in a New England community,—a moral, welleducated, industrious people; modest affluence; wellordered homes; many freeholders as heads of families; all of unmixed lineage, speaking the language of the English bible. Early puritanism had smoothed its rugged feaf the country east of the Penobscot. Yet, notwithstanding this signal disaster, the main result of the campaign at the north promised success to America. For want of re-enforcements, Clinton had evacuated Stony Point and Rhode Island. All New England, west of the Penobscot, was free from an enemy. In western New York the Senecas had learned that the alliance with the English secured them gifts, but not protection. On the Hudson river the Americans had recovered the use of King's ferry,
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 11
ent against them could strike them in the rear. The march into the country of the Senecas on the left extended to Genesee; on the right, detachments reached Cayuga lake. After destroying eighteen villages and their fields of corn, Sullivan, whose army had suffered for want of supplies, returned to New. Jersey. Meantime, a small party from Fort Pitt, under command of Colonel Brodhead, broke up the towns of the Senecas upon the upper branch of the Alleghany. The manifest inability of Great Britain to protect the Six Nations inclined them at last to desire neutrality. In June the British general Maclean, who com- June. manded in Nova Scotia, established a British post of six hundred men at what is now Castine, on Penobscot bay. To dislodge the intruders, the Massachusetts legislature sent forth nineteen armed ships, Chap. X.} 1779. June. sloops, and brigs; two of them continental vessels, the rest privateers or belonging to the state. The flotilla carried more than three h
North America (search for this): chapter 11
manage: it is in power independent, and will be so in act as soon as any occasion shall call forth that power. In North America, the civilizing activity of the human race forms the growth of state. In this new world we see all the inhabitants nfore long they will be found trading in the South Sea, in Spice Islands, and in China. This fostering happiness in North America doth produce progressive population. They have increased nearly the double in eighteen years. Commerce will open most useful, enterprising spirits, will emigrate to the new one. Much of the active property will go there also. North America is become a new primary planet, which, while it takes its own course in its own orbit, must shift the common centre o to them things as they really do exist in nature, shall form the earliest, the most sure and natural connection with North America, as being, what she is, an independent state. The new empire of America is like a giant ready to run its course. Th
China (China) (search for this): chapter 11
ture of the coast and of the winds renders marine navigation a perpetually moving intercourse of communion; and the nature of the rivers renders inland navigation but a further process of that communion; all which becomes, as it were, a one vital principle of life, extended through a one organized being, one nation. Will that most enterprising spirit be stopped at Cape Horn, or not pass the Cape of Good Hope? Before long they will be found trading in the South Sea, in Spice Islands, and in China. This fostering happiness in North America doth produce progressive population. They have increased nearly the double in eighteen years. Commerce will open the door to emigration. By constant intercommunion, America will every day approach nearer and nearer to Europe. Unless the great potentates of Europe can station cherubim Chap. X.} 1780 Jan. at every avenue with a flaming sword that turns every way, to prevent man's quitting this old world, multitudes of their people, many of
Fairfield, Virginia (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
o time to execute the intention of General Smith to burn the town. At East Haven, where Tryon commanded, dwelling-houses were fired, and cattle wantonly killed; but his troops were in like manner driven to their ships. Some unarmed inhabitants had been barbarously murdered, others carried away as prisoners. The British ranks were debased by the large infusion of convicts and vagabonds recruited from the jails of Germany. On the afternoon of the seventh, the expedition 7. landed near Fairfield. The village, a century and a quarter old, situated near the water with a lovely country for its background, contained all that was Chap. X.} 1779. July 7. best in a New England community,—a moral, welleducated, industrious people; modest affluence; wellordered homes; many freeholders as heads of families; all of unmixed lineage, speaking the language of the English bible. Early puritanism had smoothed its rugged features under the influence of a region so cheerful and benign; and an E
Mohawk River (Oregon, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
hundred and fifty-nine prisoners. Moved by the massacres of Wyoming and Cherry Valley, congress, on the twenty-fifth of February, had directed Washington to protect the inland frontier and chastise the Seneca Indians. Of the two natural routes to their country, both now traversed by railroads, that of the Susquehanna was selected for three thousand men of the best continental troops, who were to rally at Wyoming; while one thousand or more of the men of New York were to move from the Mohawk river. Before they could be ready, a party of five or six hundred men, led by Van Schaick and Willet, made a swift march of three days into the country of the Onondagas, and, without the loss of a man, destroyed their settlement. The great expedition was more tardy. Its command, which Gates declined, devolved on Sullivan, to whom Washington in May gave repeatedly the May. instruction: Move as light as possible even from the first onset. Should time be lost in transporting the troops an
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