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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10. Search the whole document.

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United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 11
d we do declare that the rights hereby asserted are of the natural rights of mankind. Randall's Jefferson, i. 219, 220. These enunciations of Jefferson on the freedom of conscience expressed the forming convictions of the people of the United States; the enactment was delayed that the great decree, which made the leap from an established church to the largest liberty of faith and public worship, might be adopted with all the solemnity of calm and careful deliberation and popular approvalnkets, were borne with the most heroic patience. In this hour of affliction, Thomas Pownall, a member of parliament, who, from observation and research and long civil service in the central states and as governor of Massachusetts, knew the United States as thoroughly as any man in Britain, published in England, in the form of a memorial to the sovereigns of Europe, these results of his experience:— The present crisis may be wrought into the great- 1780. Jan. est blessing of peace, libert
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
lly complied with, and in many counties exceeded. For many of the soldiers, the term of service expired with the year; and shorter enlistments, by which several states attempted to fill their quotas, were fatal to compactness and stability. Massachusetts offered a bounty of five hundred dollars to each of those who would enlist for three years or the war, and found few to accept the offer. The Americans wanted men and wanted money, and yet could not be subdued. An incalculable strength lay , and of clothes and blankets, were borne with the most heroic patience. In this hour of affliction, Thomas Pownall, a member of parliament, who, from observation and research and long civil service in the central states and as governor of Massachusetts, knew the United States as thoroughly as any man in Britain, published in England, in the form of a memorial to the sovereigns of Europe, these results of his experience:— The present crisis may be wrought into the great- 1780. Jan. est b
Penobscot Bay (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ty of Great Britain to protect the Six Nations inclined them at last to desire neutrality. In June the British general Maclean, who com- June. manded in Nova Scotia, established a British post of six hundred men at what is now Castine, on Penobscot bay. To dislodge the intruders, the Massachusetts legislature sent forth nineteen armed ships, Chap. X.} 1779. June. sloops, and brigs; two of them continental vessels, the rest privateers or belonging to the state. The flotilla carried morest, and they spared no sacrifice to ensure a victory. But the troops were commanded by an unskilled militia general; the chief naval officer was self-willed and incapable. Not till the twenty-fifth of July did the July 25. expedition enter Penobscot bay. The troops, who on the twenty-eighth gallantly effected their land- 28. ing, were too weak to carry the works of the British by storm; the commodore knew not how to use his mastery of the water; and, while a re-enforcement was on the way,
Hudson River (United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ho escaped through the woods. The British were left masters of the country east of the Penobscot. Yet, notwithstanding this signal disaster, the main result of the campaign at the north promised success to America. For want of re-enforcements, Clinton had evacuated Stony Point and Rhode Island. All New England, west of the Penobscot, was free from an enemy. In western New York the Senecas had learned that the alliance with the English secured them gifts, but not protection. On the Hudson river the Americans had recovered the use of King's ferry, and held all the country above it. The condition of Chap. X.} 1779. the American army was indeed more deplorable than ever. The winter set in early and with unwonted severity. Before the middle of December, and long before log huts could be built, the snow lay two feet deep in New Jersey, where the troops were cantoned; so that they saved themselves with difficulty from freezing by keeping up large fires. Continental money was valu
Stony Point (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
onducted by Clinton himself forty miles up the Hudson to gain possession of Stony Point and Verplanck's Chap. X.} 1779. Point. The garrison withdrew from their unfinished work at Stony Point. The commander at Verplanck's Point, waiting to be closely invested by water, on the second of June made an inglorious surrender. Mod befallen the British. No sooner had they strongly fortified themselves at Stony Point, than Washington, after ascertaining exactly the character of their works, falacrity, and devised improvements in the method of executing the design. Stony Point, a hill just below the highlands, projects into the Hudson, which surrounds diminishing numbers of the troops with Washington not permitting him to hold Stony Point, the cannon and stores were removed and the works razed. Soon afterwards thised success to America. For want of re-enforcements, Clinton had evacuated Stony Point and Rhode Island. All New England, west of the Penobscot, was free from an
West Indies (search for this): chapter 11
disorders; but it is young and strong, and will struggle by the vigor of internal healing principles of life against those evils, and surmount them. Its strength will grow with its years, and it will establish its constitution. Whether the West Indies are naturally parts of this North American communion, is a question of curious speculation, but of no doubt as to the fact. The European maritime powers may by force, perhaps for an age longer, preserve the dominion of these islands. The whoy. The wisdom and not the man is attended to. In this wilderness of woods the settlers move but as nature calls forth their activity. They try experiments, and the advantages of their discoveries are their own. They supply the islands of the West Indies, and even Europe itself. The inhabitants, where nothing particular directs their course, are all land-workers. One sees them laboring after the plough, or with the spade and hoe, as though they had not an idea beyond the ground they dwell up
Norfolk (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
by their execution or exile. The Virginians, since the expulsion of Lord Dunmore, free from war within their own borders, were enriching themselves by the unmolested culture of tobacco, which was exported through the Chesapeake; or, when that highway was unsafe, by a short land carriage to Albemarle Sound. On the ninth of May, Chap. X.} 1779 May 9. two thousand men under General Matthew, with fivehundred marines, anchored in Hampton Roads. The next day, after occupying Portsmouth and Norfolk, they burned every house but one in Suffolk county, and plundered or ruined all perishable property. The women and unarmed men were given over to violence and death. Parties from a sloop of war and privateers entered the principal waters of the Chesapeake, carried off or wasted stores of tobacco heaped on their banks, and burned the dwellings of the planters. Before the end of the month, the predatory expedition, having destroyed more than a hundred vessels, arrived at New York with seve
Wyoming (Wyoming, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
York, and almost within the reach of its guns. After day-break they withdrew, taking with them one hundred and fifty-nine prisoners. Moved by the massacres of Wyoming and Cherry Valley, congress, on the twenty-fifth of February, had directed Washington to protect the inland frontier and chastise the Seneca Indians. Of the two o their country, both now traversed by railroads, that of the Susquehanna was selected for three thousand men of the best continental troops, who were to rally at Wyoming; while one thousand or more of the men of New York were to move from the Mohawk river. Before they could be ready, a party of five or six hundred men, led by Vore than forty scalps Brandt to Bolton, 29 July, 1779. and one prisoner. The best part of the season was gone when Sullivan, on the last of July, moved from Wyoming. His arrival at Tioga sent terror to the Indians. Sev- July. eral of their chiefs said to Colonel Bolton in council: Why does not the great king, our father, a
Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 11
cil: Why does not the great king, our father, assist us? Our villages will be cut off, and we can no longer fight his battles. Bolton to Haldimand, 16 Aug., 1779. On the twenty-second of August, the day after he was joined by New York troops under General James Aug. 22. Clinton, Sullivan began his march up the Tioga into the heart of the Indian country. On the same day, Little David, a Mohawk chief, delivered a message from himself and the Six Nations to Haldimand, then governor of Canada: Brother! for these three years past the Six Nations have been running a race against fresh enemies, and are almost out of breath. Now Chap. X.} 1779. we shall see whether you are our loving strong brother, or whether you deceive us. Brother! we are still strong for the king of England, if you will show us that he is a man of his word, and that he will not abandon his brothers, the Six Nations. The message of Little David, a Mohawk chief, from himself and the Six Nations to Assaragaw
Verplanck's Point (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
ting the principle of freedom in religion as the inherent and inalienable possession of spiritual being, should have remained without the attribute of original legislation? The British expedition to the Chesapeake, after May 30. its return to New York, joined a detachment conducted by Clinton himself forty miles up the Hudson to gain possession of Stony Point and Verplanck's Chap. X.} 1779. Point. The garrison withdrew from their unfinished work at Stony Point. The commander at Verplanck's Point, waiting to be closely invested by water, on the second of June made an inglorious surrender. Moore's Diary, II. 163, 164. The June 2. British fortified and garrisoned the two posts which commanded King's ferry, and left the Americans no line of communication between New York and New Jersey, south of the highlands. A pillaging expedition, sent to punish the patriotism of Connecticut, was intrusted to Tryon. The fleet and transports arrived off New Haven; and, at two in the morn
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