hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
France (France) 516 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 454 0 Browse Search
Virginia Washington 326 0 Browse Search
Vergennes 289 5 Browse Search
England (United Kingdom) 206 0 Browse Search
Greene 194 6 Browse Search
Henry Clinton 189 23 Browse Search
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) 170 0 Browse Search
William Franklin 166 0 Browse Search
1780 AD 160 160 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10. Search the whole document.

Found 290 total hits in 93 results.

... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
August 22nd, 1779 AD (search for this): chapter 11
ix Nations have been running a race against fresh enemies, and are almost out of breath. Now Chap. X.} 1779. we shall see whether you are our loving strong brother, or whether you deceive us. Brother! we are still strong for the king of England, if you will show us that he is a man of his word, and that he will not abandon his brothers, the Six Nations. The message of Little David, a Mohawk chief, from himself and the Six Nations to Assaragawa (General Haldimand), Carleton Island, 22 Aug., 1779. The savages ran no risk of a surprise; for, during all the expedition, Sullivan, who delighted in the vanities of command, fired a morning and evening gun. On the twenty-ninth he opened a distant and useless Aug. 29. cannonade against breastworks which British rangers and men of the Six Nations—in all about eight hundred—had constructed at Newtown; and they took the warning to retire before a party which was sent against them could strike them in the rear. The march into the cou
es up the Hudson to gain possession of Stony Point and Verplanck's Chap. X.} 1779. Point. The garrison withdrew from their unfinished work at Stony Point. The commander at Verplanck's Point, waiting to be closely invested by water, on the second of June made an inglorious surrender. Moore's Diary, II. 163, 164. The June 2. British fortified and garrisoned the two posts which commanded King's ferry, and left the Americans no line of communication between New York and New Jersey, south of June 2. British fortified and garrisoned the two posts which commanded King's ferry, and left the Americans no line of communication between New York and New Jersey, south of the highlands. A pillaging expedition, sent to punish the patriotism of Connecticut, was intrusted to Tryon. The fleet and transports arrived off New Haven; and, at two in the morning of the fifth of July, one party July 5. landed suddenly on the west of the town, another on the east. Everything was abandoned to plunder: vessels in the harbor, public stores, and the warehouses near the sound, were destroyed by fire. The soldiers, demoralized by license, lost all discipline, 6. and the ne
A noble public spirit roused all the towns on the coast, and they spared no sacrifice to ensure a victory. But the troops were commanded by an unskilled militia general; the chief naval officer was self-willed and incapable. Not till the twenty-fifth of July did the July 25. expedition enter Penobscot bay. The troops, who on the twenty-eighth gallantly effected their land- 28. ing, were too weak to carry the works of the British by storm; the commodore knew not how to use his mastery of theJuly 25. expedition enter Penobscot bay. The troops, who on the twenty-eighth gallantly effected their land- 28. ing, were too weak to carry the works of the British by storm; the commodore knew not how to use his mastery of the water; and, while a re-enforcement was on the way, on the fourteenth of August Sir Aug. 14. George Collier arrived in a sixty-four gun ship, attended by five frigates. Two vessels of war fell into his hands; the rest and all the transports fled up the river, and were burned by the Americans themselves who escaped through the woods. The British were left masters of the country east of the Penobscot. Yet, notwithstanding this signal disaster, the main result of the campaign at the north pr
ity of calm and careful deliberation and popular approval. Who would wish that a state which used its independent right of initiating and establishing laws by abolishing the privileges of primogeniture, by cutting off entails, by forbidding the slave-trade, and by presenting the principle of freedom in religion as the inherent and inalienable possession of spiritual being, should have remained without the attribute of original legislation? The British expedition to the Chesapeake, after May 30. its return to New York, joined a detachment conducted by Clinton himself forty miles up the Hudson to gain possession of Stony Point and Verplanck's Chap. X.} 1779. Point. The garrison withdrew from their unfinished work at Stony Point. The commander at Verplanck's Point, waiting to be closely invested by water, on the second of June made an inglorious surrender. Moore's Diary, II. 163, 164. The June 2. British fortified and garrisoned the two posts which commanded King's ferry, and
July 29th, 1779 AD (search for this): chapter 11
ptured twenty-nine mowers. Savages under Macdonell laid waste the country on the west bank of the Susquehanna, till the Indians, by his own report, were glutted with plunder, prisoners, and scalps. Thirty miles of a closely settled country were burned. Brandt and his crew consumed with fire all the settlement of Minisink, one fort excepted. Over a party of a hundred and fifty men, by whom they were pursued, they gained the advantage, taking more than forty scalps Brandt to Bolton, 29 July, 1779. and one prisoner. The best part of the season was gone when Sullivan, on the last of July, moved from Wyoming. His arrival at Tioga sent terror to the Indians. Sev- July. eral of their chiefs said to Colonel Bolton in council: Why does not the great king, our father, assist us? Our villages will be cut off, and we can no longer fight his battles. Bolton to Haldimand, 16 Aug., 1779. On the twenty-second of August, the day after he was joined by New York troops under General
was a double row of abattis. Breastworks and strong batteries could rake any column which might advance over the beach and the marsh. From the river, vessels of war commanded the foot of the hill. Conducting twelve hundred chosen men in single file over mountains and through morasses and narrow passes, Wayne halted them at a distance of a mile and a half from the enemy, while with the principal officers he reconnoitred the works. About twenty minutes after twelve on the morning of the sixteenth, 16. the assault began, the troops placing their sole dependence on the bayonet. Two advance parties of Chap. X.} 1779. July. 16. twenty men each, in one of which seventeen out of the twenty were killed or wounded, removed the abattis and other obstructions. Wayne, leading on a regiment, was wounded in the head, but, supported by his aids, still went forward. The two columns, heedless of musketry and grape-shot, gained the centre of the works nearly at the same moment. On the right
ation between New York and New Jersey, south of the highlands. A pillaging expedition, sent to punish the patriotism of Connecticut, was intrusted to Tryon. The fleet and transports arrived off New Haven; and, at two in the morning of the fifth of July, one party July 5. landed suddenly on the west of the town, another on the east. Everything was abandoned to plunder: vessels in the harbor, public stores, and the warehouses near the sound, were destroyed by fire. The soldiers, demoralizeJuly 5. landed suddenly on the west of the town, another on the east. Everything was abandoned to plunder: vessels in the harbor, public stores, and the warehouses near the sound, were destroyed by fire. The soldiers, demoralized by license, lost all discipline, 6. and the next morning retired before the Connecticut militia, who left them no time to execute the intention of General Smith to burn the town. At East Haven, where Tryon commanded, dwelling-houses were fired, and cattle wantonly killed; but his troops were in like manner driven to their ships. Some unarmed inhabitants had been barbarously murdered, others carried away as prisoners. The British ranks were debased by the large infusion of convicts and vaga
August 29th (search for this): chapter 11
for the king of England, if you will show us that he is a man of his word, and that he will not abandon his brothers, the Six Nations. The message of Little David, a Mohawk chief, from himself and the Six Nations to Assaragawa (General Haldimand), Carleton Island, 22 Aug., 1779. The savages ran no risk of a surprise; for, during all the expedition, Sullivan, who delighted in the vanities of command, fired a morning and evening gun. On the twenty-ninth he opened a distant and useless Aug. 29. cannonade against breastworks which British rangers and men of the Six Nations—in all about eight hundred—had constructed at Newtown; and they took the warning to retire before a party which was sent against them could strike them in the rear. The march into the country of the Senecas on the left extended to Genesee; on the right, detachments reached Cayuga lake. After destroying eighteen villages and their fields of corn, Sullivan, whose army had suffered for want of supplies, returne
uated Stony Point and Rhode Island. All New England, west of the Penobscot, was free from an enemy. In western New York the Senecas had learned that the alliance with the English secured them gifts, but not protection. On the Hudson river the Americans had recovered the use of King's ferry, and held all the country above it. The condition of Chap. X.} 1779. the American army was indeed more deplorable than ever. The winter set in early and with unwonted severity. Before the middle of December, and long before log huts could be built, the snow lay two feet deep in New Jersey, where the troops were cantoned; so that they saved themselves with difficulty from freezing by keeping up large fires. Continental money was valued at no more than thirty for one, and even at that rate the country people took it unwillingly. The credit of congress being exhausted, there could be no regularity in supplies. Sometimes the army was five or six days together without bread; at other times as ma
d; but his troops were in like manner driven to their ships. Some unarmed inhabitants had been barbarously murdered, others carried away as prisoners. The British ranks were debased by the large infusion of convicts and vagabonds recruited from the jails of Germany. On the afternoon of the seventh, the expedition 7. landed near Fairfield. The village, a century and a quarter old, situated near the water with a lovely country for its background, contained all that was Chap. X.} 1779. July 7. best in a New England community,—a moral, welleducated, industrious people; modest affluence; wellordered homes; many freeholders as heads of families; all of unmixed lineage, speaking the language of the English bible. Early puritanism had smoothed its rugged features under the influence of a region so cheerful and benign; and an Episcopal church, that stood by the side of the larger meeting-house, proved their toleration. A parish so prospering, with inhabitants so cultivated, had not i
... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10