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hundred and six British invalids who were descending the Pedee river. A large boat from Georgetown, laden with stores for the British at Cheraw, was seized by Americans. A general revolt in the public mind against British authority invited Gates onwards. To the encouragements of others the general added his own illusions; he was confident that Cornwallis, with detached troops from his main body, was gone to Savannah, Kapp's Kalb, 213. and from his camp on the Pedee he announced on the fourth, by 4. a proclamation, that their late triumphant and insulting foes had retreated with precipitation and dismay on the approach of his numerous, well-appointed, and formidable army; forgiveness was promised to those who had been forced to profess allegiance, and pardon was withheld only from those apostate sons of America who should hereafter support the enemy. On the seventh, at the Cross Roads, the troops with 7. Gates made a junction with the North Carolina militia under Caswell, a
rom his main body, was gone to Savannah, Kapp's Kalb, 213. and from his camp on the Pedee he announced on the fourth, by 4. a proclamation, that their late triumphant and insulting foes had retreated with precipitation and dismay on the approach of his numerous, well-appointed, and formidable army; forgiveness was promised to those who had been forced to profess allegiance, and pardon was withheld only from those apostate sons of America who should hereafter support the enemy. On the seventh, at the Cross Roads, the troops with 7. Gates made a junction with the North Carolina militia under Caswell, and proceeded towards the enemy Chap. XV.} 1780. Aug. at Lynch's creek. In the following night that post was abandoned; and Lord Rawdon occupied another on the southern bank of Little Lynch's creek, unassailable from the deep muddy channel of the river, and within a day's march of Camden. Here he was joined by Tarleton with a small detachment of cavalry, who on their way had m
have turned Lord Rawdon's flank, and made an easy conquest of Camden. Missing his only opportunity, on the eleventh, after a useless halt of two 11. days he defiled by the right, and, marching to the north of Camden, on the thirteenth encamped at 13. Clermont, which the British had just abandoned. The time thus allowed, Rawdon used to strengthen himself by four companies from Ninety-Six, as well as by the troops from Clermont, and to throw up redoubts at Camden. On the evening of the tenth, Cornwallis left 10. Charleston and arrived at Camden before the dawn of the fourteenth. At ten o'clock on the night of 14. the fifteenth, he set his troops in motion in the 15. hope of joining battle with the Americans at the break of day. On the fourteenth, Gates had been joined by seven 14. hundred Virginia militia under the command of Stevens. On the same day Sumpter, appearing in camp with four hundred men, asked for as many more to intercept a convoy with its stores on the ro
creek, unassailable from the deep muddy channel of the river, and within a day's march of Camden. Here he was joined by Tarleton with a small detachment of cavalry, who on their way had mercilessly ravaged the country on the Black river as a punishment to its patriot inhabitants, and as a terror to the dwellers on the Wateree and Santee. By a forced march up the stream, Gates could have turned Lord Rawdon's flank, and made an easy conquest of Camden. Missing his only opportunity, on the eleventh, after a useless halt of two 11. days he defiled by the right, and, marching to the north of Camden, on the thirteenth encamped at 13. Clermont, which the British had just abandoned. The time thus allowed, Rawdon used to strengthen himself by four companies from Ninety-Six, as well as by the troops from Clermont, and to throw up redoubts at Camden. On the evening of the tenth, Cornwallis left 10. Charleston and arrived at Camden before the dawn of the fourteenth. At ten o'clock on t
, which the British had just abandoned. The time thus allowed, Rawdon used to strengthen himself by four companies from Ninety-Six, as well as by the troops from Clermont, and to throw up redoubts at Camden. On the evening of the tenth, Cornwallis left 10. Charleston and arrived at Camden before the dawn of the fourteenth. At ten o'clock on the night of 14. the fifteenth, he set his troops in motion in the 15. hope of joining battle with the Americans at the break of day. On the fourteenth, Gates had been joined by seven 14. hundred Virginia militia under the command of Stevens. On the same day Sumpter, appearing in camp with four hundred men, asked for as many more to intercept a convoy with its stores on the road from Charleston to Camden. Gates, who be- Chap. XV.} 1780. Aug. lieved himself at the head of seven thousand men, granted his request. Sumpter left the camp, taking with him eight hundred men, and on the next morning captured the wagons and their escort.
to a council of officers an order to begin their march at ten o'clock in the evening of that day. He was listened to in silence. Many wondered at a night march of an army of which more than twothirds were militia, that had never even been paraded together; but Gates, who had the most sanguine confidence of victory and the dispersion of the enemy, appointed no place for rendezvous, and began his march before his baggage was sufficiently in the rear. At half-past 2 on the morning of the sixteenth, 16. about nine miles from Camden, the advance guard of Cornwallis fell in with the advance guard of the Americans. To the latter the collision was a surprise. Their cavalry was in front, but Armand, its commander, who disliked his orders, was insubordinate; the horsemen in his command turned suddenly and fled; and neither he nor they did any service that night or the next day. The retreat of Armand's legion produced confusion in the first Maryland brigade, and spread consternation thro
xample of his chief. On the nineteenth, American officers, coming into 19. Charlotte, placed their hopes of a happier turn of events on Sumpter, who commanded the largest American force that now remained in the Carolinas. That detachment had on the fifteenth captured 15. more than forty British wagons laden with stores, and secured more than a hundred prisoners. On 16. hearing of the misfortunes of the army of Gates, Sumpter retreated slowly and carelessly up the Wateree. On the seventeenth, he remained through 17. the whole night at Rocky Mount, though he knew that the British were on the opposite side of the river, and in possession of boats and the ford. On the eighteenth, he advanced only eight miles; and 18. on the north bank of Fishing creek, at bright midday, his troops stacked their arms; some took repose; some went to the river to bathe; some strolled in search of supplies; and Sumpter himself fell fast Chap. XV.} 1780. Aug. asleep in the shade of a wagon. In
that now remained in the Carolinas. That detachment had on the fifteenth captured 15. more than forty British wagons laden with stores, and secured more than a hundred prisoners. On 16. hearing of the misfortunes of the army of Gates, Sumpter retreated slowly and carelessly up the Wateree. On the seventeenth, he remained through 17. the whole night at Rocky Mount, though he knew that the British were on the opposite side of the river, and in possession of boats and the ford. On the eighteenth, he advanced only eight miles; and 18. on the north bank of Fishing creek, at bright midday, his troops stacked their arms; some took repose; some went to the river to bathe; some strolled in search of supplies; and Sumpter himself fell fast Chap. XV.} 1780. Aug. asleep in the shade of a wagon. In this state, a party under Tarleton cut them off from their arms and put them to rout, taking two or three hundred of them captive, and recovering the British prisoners and wagons. On the twe
otte. The next morning Gates, who was a petty intriguer, not a soldier, left Caswell to rally such troops as might come in; and himself sped to Hillsborough, where the North Carolina legislature was soon to meet, riding altogether more than two hundred miles in three days and a half, and running away from his army so fast and so far that he knew nothing about its condition. Caswell, after spending one day at Charlotte, disobeyed the order, and followed the example of his chief. On the nineteenth, American officers, coming into 19. Charlotte, placed their hopes of a happier turn of events on Sumpter, who commanded the largest American force that now remained in the Carolinas. That detachment had on the fifteenth captured 15. more than forty British wagons laden with stores, and secured more than a hundred prisoners. On 16. hearing of the misfortunes of the army of Gates, Sumpter retreated slowly and carelessly up the Wateree. On the seventeenth, he remained through 17. the
h captured 15. more than forty British wagons laden with stores, and secured more than a hundred prisoners. On 16. hearing of the misfortunes of the army of Gates, Sumpter retreated slowly and carelessly up the Wateree. On the seventeenth, he remained through 17. the whole night at Rocky Mount, though he knew that the British were on the opposite side of the river, and in possession of boats and the ford. On the eighteenth, he advanced only eight miles; and 18. on the north bank of Fishing creek, at bright midday, his troops stacked their arms; some took repose; some went to the river to bathe; some strolled in search of supplies; and Sumpter himself fell fast Chap. XV.} 1780. Aug. asleep in the shade of a wagon. In this state, a party under Tarleton cut them off from their arms and put them to rout, taking two or three hundred of them captive, and recovering the British prisoners and wagons. On the twentieth, Sumpter rode into Char- 20. lotte alone, without hat or saddle.
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