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Charlotte (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
safest route, recommended by a memorial of the principal officers, was by way of Salisbury and Charlotte, through a most fertile, salubrious, and well-cultivated country, inhabited by presbyterians w at their posts in the field, and flying, or, as he called it, retiring as fast as possible to Charlotte. The militia having been routed, Webster came round the flank of the first Maryland brigaden pressed on and still on, until, late in the night, the two generals escorted each other into Charlotte. The next morning Gates, who was a petty intriguer, not a soldier, left Caswell to rally such fast and so far that he knew nothing about its condition. Caswell, after spending one day at Charlotte, disobeyed the order, and followed the example of his chief. On the nineteenth, American officers, coming into 19. Charlotte, placed their hopes of a happier turn of events on Sumpter, who commanded the largest American force that now remained in the Carolinas. That detachment had on t
Clinton, La. (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
Chapter 15: War in the South: Cornwallis and Gates. 1780. rivalry and dissension between Clinton and Corn- Chap. XV.} 1780. wallis already glowed under the ashes. The formerhad written home more of truth than was willingly listened to; and, though he clung with tenacity to his commission, he intimated conditionally a wish to be recalled. Germain took him so far at his word as to give him leave to transfer to Cornwallis, the new favorite, the chief command in North America. Alre on the spot lists of its militia, and to see. that the orders of Cornwallis were carried into execution. Any Carolinian thereafter taken in arms might be sentenced to death for desertion and bearing arms against his country. Cornwallis to Clinton, 30 June, 1780. The proposals of those who offered to raise provincial corps were accepted; and men of the province, void of honor and compassion, received commissions, gathered about them profligate ruffians, and roamed through Carolina, indulg
Cheraw (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
der the insolence of an army in which every soldier was a licensed plunderer, and every officer a functionary with power to outlaw peaceful citizens at will. The British commander on the Pedee called in his detachments, abandoned his post on the Cheraw hill, and repaired to Lord Rawdon at Camden. An escort of Carolinians who had been forced to take up arms on the British side rose against their officers, and made prisoners of a hundred and six British invalids who were descending the Pedee river. A large boat from Georgetown, laden with stores for the British at Cheraw, was seized by Americans. A general revolt in the public mind against British authority invited Gates onwards. To the encouragements of others the general added his own illusions; he was confident that Cornwallis, with detached troops from his main body, was gone to Savannah, Kapp's Kalb, 213. and from his camp on the Pedee he announced on the fourth, by 4. a proclamation, that their late triumphant and insultin
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
ed, and to advance as a conqueror at least to the Chesapeake. Clinton had left with him more than five thousand effective troops, besides more than a thousand in Georgia; to these were to be added the regiments which he was determined to organize out of the southern people. As fast as the districts submitted, the new com- Chaph; by a smaller post at Rocky Mount, it kept up a communication with Ninety-Six. In the opinion of Clinton, six thousand men were required to hold Carolina and Georgia; yet at the end of June Cornwallis reported that he had put an end to all resistance in those states, and in September, after the harvest, would march into North uce that province. But the violence of his measures roused the courage of despair. On hearing of the acts of the British, Houston, the delegate in congress from Georgia, wrote to Jay: Our misfortunes are, under God, the source of our safety. Our captive soldiers will, as usual, be poisoned, starved, and insulted,—will be scourge
Buffalo Ford (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
nces. Caswell, who was in command of the militia, disregarded his orders from the vanity of acting separately. Officers of European experience alone, wrote Kalb on the seventh of July to his wife, do not know what it is to contend against difficulties and vexations. My present condition Chap. XV.} 1780. June. makes me doubly anxious to return to you. Yet, under all privations, the officers and men of his command vied with each other in maintaining order and harmony. In his camp at Buffalo ford on Deep river, while he was still doubting how to direct his march, he received news of measures adopted by congress for the southern campaign. Washington wished Greene to succeed Lincoln; congress, not asking his advice and not ignorant of his opinion, on the thirteenth of June unanimously ap- 13. pointed Gates to the command of the southern army, and constituted him independent of the commanderin-chief. He received his orders from congress and was to make his reports directly to th
Delaware (Delaware, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
Lord Rawdon. A battalion with a six-pounder was posted behind each wing as a reserve. The cavalry were in the rear ready to charge or to pursue. On the American side, the second Maryland brigade, of which Gist was brigadier, and the men of Delaware, occupied the right under Kalb; the North Carolina division with Caswell, the cenatre; and Stevens with the newly arrived Virginia militia, the left: the best troops on the side strongest by nature, the worst on the weakest. The first Maryland ers, and obliged to give Chap. XV.} 1780. Aug. 16. ground. After being twice rallied, they finally retreated. The division which Kalb commanded continued long in action, and never did troops show greater courage than these men of Maryland and Delaware. The horse of Kalb had been killed under him, and he had been badly wounded; yet he continued the fight on foot. At last, in the hope that victory was on his side, he led a charge, drove the division under Rawdon, took fifty prisoners, and wou
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 16
s had more than ten bullets; before its end, they used the arms and ammunition of the fallen. Among the partisans who were present in this fight was Andrew Jackson, an orphan boy of Scotch-Irish descent, whose hatred of oppression and love of country drove him to deeds beyond his years. Sumpter drew back to the Catawba settlement, and from all parts of South Carolina patriots flocked to his standard. Thus far the south rested on its own exertions. Relying on the internal strength of New England, and the central states for their protection, Washington was willing to incur hazard for the relief of the Carolinas; and, with the approval of congress, from his army of less than ten and a half thousand men, of whom twenty-eight hundred were to be discharged in April, he detached General Kalb with the Maryland division of nearly two thousand men and the Delaware regiment. Marching orders for the southward were also given to the corps of Major Lee. The May. movement of Kalb was slow f
Augusta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
ers straggling, the persons so offending may assure themselves of rigorous punishment, either by whipping, imprisonment, or being sent to serve in the West Indies. I will give the inhabitants ten guineas for the head of any deserter belonging to the volunteers of Ireland, and five guineas only if they bring him in alive. The genuineness of the letter is unquestioned. The chain of posts for holding South Carolina consisted of Georgetown, Charleston, Beaufort, and Savannah on the sea; Augusta, Ninety-Six, and Camden in the interior. Of these Camden was the most im- Chap. XV.} 1780. July. portant, for it was the key between the north and south; by a smaller post at Rocky Mount, it kept up a communication with Ninety-Six. In the opinion of Clinton, six thousand men were required to hold Carolina and Georgia; yet at the end of June Cornwallis reported that he had put an end to all resistance in those states, and in September, after the harvest, would march into North Carolina
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
having been routed, Webster came round the flank of the first Maryland brigade, and attacked them in front and on their side. Though Smallwood was nowhere to be found, they were sustained by the reserve, till the brigade was outflanked by greatly superior numbers, and obliged to give Chap. XV.} 1780. Aug. 16. ground. After being twice rallied, they finally retreated. The division which Kalb commanded continued long in action, and never did troops show greater courage than these men of Maryland and Delaware. The horse of Kalb had been killed under him, and he had been badly wounded; yet he continued the fight on foot. At last, in the hope that victory was on his side, he led a charge, drove the division under Rawdon, took fifty prisoners, and would not believe that he was not about to gain the day, when Cornwallis poured against him a party of dragoons and infantry. Even then he did not yield, until disabled by many wounds. The victory cost the British about five hundred of
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
command in North America. All opposition in South Carolina was for the moment at an end, when Cornwallis ey valued, was deputed to visit each district in South Carolina to procure on the spot lists of its militia, ann at Williams's plantation in the upper part of South Carolina, and burned every bible into which the Scottishnquestioned. The chain of posts for holding South Carolina consisted of Georgetown, Charleston, Beaufort, led from the country. Determined patriots of South Carolina took refuge in the state on their north. Amongo the Catawba settlement, and from all parts of South Carolina patriots flocked to his standard. Thus far tormation received at Hillsborough from Huger of South Carolina, Gates formed his plan to march directly to Ca having detached Marion towards the interior of South Carolina to watch the motions of the enemy and furnish id had kept his small command on the frontier of South Carolina, having found means to subsist then and to mai
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