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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10. Search the whole document.

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Pelatiah Webster (search for this): chapter 16
The front line, to which were attached two six-pounders and two three-pounders, was commanded on the right by Lieutenant-Colonel Webster, on the left by Lord Rawdon. A battalion with a six-pounder was posted behind each wing as a reserve. The cavho had been with the army only one day. Stevens gave the word, and, as they prepared to move forward, Cornwallis ordered Webster, whose division contained his best troops, to assail them, while Rawdon was to engage the American right. As the British with Webster rushed on, firing and shouting huzza, Stevens reminded his militia that they had bayonets; but they had received them only the day before and knew not how to use them; so, dropping their muskets, they escaped to the woods with such sphe field, and flying, or, as he called it, retiring as fast as possible to Charlotte. The militia having been routed, Webster came round the flank of the first Maryland brigade, and attacked them in front and on their side. Though Smallwood was
ount, it kept up a communication with Ninety-Six. In the opinion of Clinton, six thousand men were required to hold Carolina and Georgia; yet at the end of June Cornwallis reported that he had put an end to all resistance in those states, and in September, after the harvest, would march into North Carolina to reduce that province. But the violence of his measures roused the courage of despair. On hearing of the acts of the British, Houston, the delegate in congress from Georgia, wrote to Jay: Our misfortunes are, under God, the source of our safety. Our captive soldiers will, as usual, be poisoned, starved, and insulted,—will be scourged into the service of the enemy; the citizens will suffer pillaging, violences, and conflagrations; a fruitful country will be desolated; but the loss of Charleston will promote the general cause. The enemy have overrun a considerable part of the state in the hour of its nakedness and debility; but, as their measures seem as usual to be dictated
estowed on him unusual powers and all its confidence. He might address himself directly to Virginia and the states beyond it for supplies; of himself alone appoint all staff-officers; and take such measures as he should think most proper for the defence of the south. From his plantation in Virginia, Gates made his acknowledgment to congress without elation; to Lincoln he wrote in modest and affectionate language. His first important act was the request to congress for the appointment of Morgan as a brigadier-general in the continental service, and in this he was supported by Jefferson and Rutledge. He enjoined on the corps of White and Washington, and on all remnants of continental troops in Virginia, to repair to the southern army with all possible diligence. Upon information received at Hillsborough from Huger of South Carolina, Gates formed his plan to march directly to Camden, confident of its easy capt- Chap. XV.} 1780. June. ure and the consequent recovery of the coun
ment to congress without elation; to Lincoln he wrote in modest and affectionate language. His first important act was the request to congress for the appointment of Morgan as a brigadier-general in the continental service, and in this he was supported by Jefferson and Rutledge. He enjoined on the corps of White and Washington, and on all remnants of continental troops in Virginia, to repair to the southern army with all possible diligence. Upon information received at Hillsborough from Huger of South Carolina, Gates formed his plan to march directly to Camden, confident of its easy capt- Chap. XV.} 1780. June. ure and the consequent recovery of the country. To Kalb he wrote: Enough has already been lost in a vain defence of Charleston; if more is sacrificed, the southern states are undone; and this may go nearly to undo the rest. Arriving in the camp of Kalb, he was confirmed in his purpose by Thomas Pinckney, who was his aid, and by Marion. It was the opinion of Kalb, t
Porterfield (search for this): chapter 16
ean cattle, fruit, and unripe maize. On the third of August, the army crossed the Pedee Aug. 3. river, making a junction on its southern bank with Lieutenant-Colonel Porterfield of Virginia, an excellent officer, who had been sent to the relief of Charleston, and had kept his small command on the frontier of South Carolina, haon produced confusion in the first Maryland brigade, and spread consternation throughout the army, till the light infantry on the right under the command of Colonel Porterfield threw back the party that made the attack and restored order; but at a great price, for Porterfield received a wound which Chap. XV.} 1780. Aug. 16. provePorterfield received a wound which Chap. XV.} 1780. Aug. 16. proved mortal. To a council of the American general officers held immediately in the rear of the lines, Gates communicated the report of a prisoner, that a large regular force of British troops under Cornwallis was five or six hundred yards in their front, and submitted the question whether it would be proper to retreat. Stevens dec
Patrick Ferguson (search for this): chapter 16
As fast as the districts submitted, the new com- Chap. XV.} 1780. mander enrolled all the inhabitants, and appointed field-officers with civil as well as military power. The men of property above forty were made responsible for order, but were not to be called out except in case of insurrection or of actual invasion; the younger men who composed the second class were held liable to serve six months in each year. Some hundreds of commissions were issued for the militia regiments. Major Patrick Ferguson, known from his services in New Jersey and greatly valued, was deputed to visit each district in South Carolina to procure on the spot lists of its militia, and to see. that the orders of Cornwallis were carried into execution. Any Carolinian thereafter taken in arms might be sentenced to death for desertion and bearing arms against his country. Cornwallis to Clinton, 30 June, 1780. The proposals of those who offered to raise provincial corps were accepted; and men of the provinc
ed in one engagement must equip them for another. On the rumor of an advancing American army, Rawdon called on all the inhabitants round Camden to join him in arms. One hundred and sixty who refusrteenth encamped at 13. Clermont, which the British had just abandoned. The time thus allowed, Rawdon used to strengthen himself by four companies from Ninety-Six, as well as by the troops from Cler. Stevens declared himself eager for battle, saying that the information was but a stratagem of Rawdon to escape the attack. No other advice being offered, Gates desired them to form in line of battard, Cornwallis ordered Webster, whose division contained his best troops, to assail them, while Rawdon was to engage the American right. As the British with Webster rushed on, firing and shouting hut. At last, in the hope that victory was on his side, he led a charge, drove the division under Rawdon, took fifty prisoners, and would not believe that he was not about to gain the day, when Cornwal
James Williams (search for this): chapter 16
o death, as subjects of mercy. A quartermaster of Tarleton's legion entered the house of Samuel Wyly near Camden, and, because he had served as a volunteer in the defence of Charleston, cut him in pieces. The presbyterians supported the cause of independence; and indeed the American revolution was but the application of the principles of the reformation to civil government. One Huck, a captain of British militia, fired the library and dwelling-house Chap. XV.} 1780. of the clergyman at Williams's plantation in the upper part of South Carolina, and burned every bible into which the Scottish translation of the psalms was bound. Under the immediate eye of Cornwallis, the prisoners who had capitulated in Charleston were the subjects of perpetual persecution, unless they would exchange their paroles for oaths of allegiance; and some of those who had been accustomed to live in affluence from the produce of lands cultivated by slaves had not fortitude enough to dare to be poor. Mechani
erved as a volunteer in the defence of Charleston, cut him in pieces. The presbyterians supported the cause of independence; and indeed the American revolution was but the application of the principles of the reformation to civil government. One Huck, a captain of British militia, fired the library and dwelling-house Chap. XV.} 1780. of the clergyman at Williams's plantation in the upper part of South Carolina, and burned every bible into which the Scottish translation of the psalms was bounm in arms. One hundred and sixty who refused he shut up during the heat of midsummer in one prison, and loaded more than twenty of them with chains, some of whom were protected by the capitulation of Charleston. On the twelfth day of July, Captain Huck was sent 12. out with thirty-five dragoons, twenty mounted infantry, and sixty militia, on a patrol. His troops were posted in a lane at the village of Cross Roads, near the source of Fishing creek; and women were on their knees to him, vain
on. Of all the states, Virginia, of which Jefferson was Chap. XV.} 1780. then the governor, lay most exposed to invasion from the sea, and was in constant danger from the savages on the west; yet it was unmindful of its own perils. Its legislature met on the ninth of May. Within ten May 9. minutes after the house was formed, Richard Henry Lee proposed to raise and send twenty-five hundred men to serve for three months in Carolina, and to be paid in tobacco, which had a real value. Major Nelson with sixty horse, and Colonel Armand with his corps, were already moving to the south. The force assembled at Williamsburg, for the protection of the country on the James river, consisted of no more than three hundred men; but they too were sent to Carolina before the end of the month. North Carolina made a requisition on Virginia for arms, and received them. With a magnanimity which knew nothing of fear, Virginia laid herself bare for the protection of the Carolinas. The news that
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