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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10. Search the whole document.

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Carolinian (search for this): chapter 16
to be called out except in case of insurrection or of actual invasion; the younger men who composed the second class were held liable to serve six months in each year. Some hundreds of commissions were issued for the militia regiments. Major Patrick Ferguson, known from his services in New Jersey and greatly valued, was deputed to visit each district in South Carolina to procure on the spot lists of its militia, and to see. that the orders of Cornwallis were carried into execution. Any Carolinian thereafter taken in arms might be sentenced to death for desertion and bearing arms against his country. Cornwallis to Clinton, 30 June, 1780. The proposals of those who offered to raise provincial corps were accepted; and men of the province, void of honor and compassion, received commissions, gathered about them profligate ruffians, and roamed through Carolina, indulging in rapine, and ready to put patriots to death as outlaws. Cornwallis himself never regarded a deserter, or any who
George Germain (search for this): chapter 16
Chapter 15: War in the South: Cornwallis and Gates. 1780. rivalry and dissension between Clinton and Corn- Chap. XV.} 1780. wallis already glowed under the ashes. The formerhad written home more of truth than was willingly listened to; and, though he clung with tenacity to his commission, he intimated conditionally a wish to be recalled. Germain took him so far at his word as to give him leave to transfer to Cornwallis, the new favorite, the chief command in North America. All opposition in South Carolina was for the moment at an end, when Cornwallis entered on his separate command. He proposed to himself no less than to keep possession of all that had been gained, and to advance as a conqueror at least to the Chesapeake. Clinton had left with him more than five thousand effective troops, besides more than a thousand in Georgia; to these were to be added the regiments which he was determined to organize out of the southern people. As fast as the districts submi
Otho Williams (search for this): chapter 16
arolina division with Caswell, the cenatre; and Stevens with the newly arrived Virginia militia, the left: the best troops on the side strongest by nature, the worst on the weakest. The first Maryland brigade, at the head of which Smallwood should have appeared, formed a second line about two hundred yards in the rear of the first. The artillery was divided between the two brigades. Gates took his place in the rear of the second line. Chap. XV.} 1780. Aug. 16. He gave no order till Otho Williams proposed to him to begin the attack with the brigade of Stevens, his worst troops, who had been with the army only one day. Stevens gave the word, and, as they prepared to move forward, Cornwallis ordered Webster, whose division contained his best troops, to assail them, while Rawdon was to engage the American right. As the British with Webster rushed on, firing and shouting huzza, Stevens reminded his militia that they had bayonets; but they had received them only the day before and kn
th of July to his wife, do not know what it is to contend against difficulties and vexations. My present condition Chap. XV.} 1780. June. makes me doubly anxious to return to you. Yet, under all privations, the officers and men of his command vied with each other in maintaining order and harmony. In his camp at Buffalo ford on Deep river, while he was still doubting how to direct his march, he received news of measures adopted by congress for the southern campaign. Washington wished Greene to succeed Lincoln; congress, not asking his advice and not ignorant of his opinion, on the thirteenth of June unanimously ap- 13. pointed Gates to the command of the southern army, and constituted him independent of the commanderin-chief. He received his orders from congress and was to make his reports directly to that body, which bestowed on him unusual powers and all its confidence. He might address himself directly to Virginia and the states beyond it for supplies; of himself alone ap
Richard Henry Lee (search for this): chapter 16
usand men, of whom twenty-eight hundred were to be discharged in April, he detached General Kalb with the Maryland division of nearly two thousand men and the Delaware regiment. Marching orders for the southward were also given to the corps of Major Lee. The May. movement of Kalb was slow for want of transportation. At Petersburg, in Virginia, he added to his command a regiment of artillery with twelve cannon. Of all the states, Virginia, of which Jefferson was Chap. XV.} 1780. then ther, lay most exposed to invasion from the sea, and was in constant danger from the savages on the west; yet it was unmindful of its own perils. Its legislature met on the ninth of May. Within ten May 9. minutes after the house was formed, Richard Henry Lee proposed to raise and send twenty-five hundred men to serve for three months in Carolina, and to be paid in tobacco, which had a real value. Major Nelson with sixty horse, and Colonel Armand with his corps, were already moving to the south
; the North Carolina division with Caswell, the cenatre; and Stevens with the newly arrived Virginia militia, the left: the best troops on the side strongest by nature, the worst on the weakest. The first Maryland brigade, at the head of which Smallwood should have appeared, formed a second line about two hundred yards in the rear of the first. The artillery was divided between the two brigades. Gates took his place in the rear of the second line. Chap. XV.} 1780. Aug. 16. He gave no ordeposts in the field, and flying, or, as he called it, retiring as fast as possible to Charlotte. The militia having been routed, Webster came round the flank of the first Maryland brigade, and attacked them in front and on their side. Though Smallwood was nowhere to be found, they were sustained by the reserve, till the brigade was outflanked by greatly superior numbers, and obliged to give Chap. XV.} 1780. Aug. 16. ground. After being twice rallied, they finally retreated. The division
Virginia Washington (search for this): chapter 16
his standard. Thus far the south rested on its own exertions. Relying on the internal strength of New England, and the central states for their protection, Washington was willing to incur hazard for the relief of the Carolinas; and, with the approval of congress, from his army of less than ten and a half thousand men, of whom Buffalo ford on Deep river, while he was still doubting how to direct his march, he received news of measures adopted by congress for the southern campaign. Washington wished Greene to succeed Lincoln; congress, not asking his advice and not ignorant of his opinion, on the thirteenth of June unanimously ap- 13. pointed Gates ment of Morgan as a brigadier-general in the continental service, and in this he was supported by Jefferson and Rutledge. He enjoined on the corps of White and Washington, and on all remnants of continental troops in Virginia, to repair to the southern army with all possible diligence. Upon information received at Hillsborough
only from those apostate sons of America who should hereafter support the enemy. On the seventh, at the Cross Roads, the troops with 7. Gates made a junction with the North Carolina militia under Caswell, and proceeded towards the enemy Chap. XV.} 1780. Aug. at Lynch's creek. In the following night that post was abandoned; and Lord Rawdon occupied another on the southern bank of Little Lynch's creek, unassailable from the deep muddy channel of the river, and within a day's march of Camden. Here he was joined by Tarleton with a small detachment of cavalry, who on their way had mercilessly ravaged the country on the Black river as a punishment to its patriot inhabitants, and as a terror to the dwellers on the Wateree and Santee. By a forced march up the stream, Gates could have turned Lord Rawdon's flank, and made an easy conquest of Camden. Missing his only opportunity, on the eleventh, after a useless halt of two 11. days he defiled by the right, and, marching to the nort
enant-Colonel Webster, on the left by Lord Rawdon. A battalion with a six-pounder was posted behind each wing as a reserve. The cavalry were in the rear ready to charge or to pursue. On the American side, the second Maryland brigade, of which Gist was brigadier, and the men of Delaware, occupied the right under Kalb; the North Carolina division with Caswell, the cenatre; and Stevens with the newly arrived Virginia militia, the left: the best troops on the side strongest by nature, the worsttheir great loss, wrote Marion, is equal to a defeat. How many Americans perished on the field or surrendered is not accurately known. They saved none of their artillery, and little of their baggage. Except one hundred continental soldiers whom Gist conducted across the swamps, through which the cavalry could not follow, every corps was dispersed. The canes and underwood that hid them from their pursuers separated them from one another. Kalb lingered for three days; but before he closed h
Determined patriots of South Carolina took refuge in the state on their north. Among them was Sumpter, who in the command of a continental regiment had shown courage and ability. To punish his flie on their knees to him, vainly begging mercy for their families and their homes; when suddenly Sumpter and his men, though inferior in number, dashed into the lane at both ends, killed the commanderas supplied with arms and ammunition, and then conducted it to its old commander, who was with Sumpter in the Ca- Chap. XV.} 1780. July 30. tawba settlement. Thus strengthened, Sumpter, on the ten joined by seven 14. hundred Virginia militia under the command of Stevens. On the same day Sumpter, appearing in camp with four hundred men, asked for as many more to intercept a convoy with itss; some took repose; some went to the river to bathe; some strolled in search of supplies; and Sumpter himself fell fast Chap. XV.} 1780. Aug. asleep in the shade of a wagon. In this state, a part
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