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ake up arms on the British side rose against their officers, and made prisoners of a hundred and six British invalids who were descending the Pedee river. A large boat from Georgetown, laden with stores for the British at Cheraw, was seized by Americans. A general revolt in the public mind against British authority invited Gates onwards. To the encouragements of others the general added his own illusions; he was confident that Cornwallis, with detached troops from his main body, was gone to d against him a party of dragoons and infantry. Even then he did not yield, until disabled by many wounds. The victory cost the British about five hundred of their best troops; their great loss, wrote Marion, is equal to a defeat. How many Americans perished on the field or surrendered is not accurately known. They saved none of their artillery, and little of their baggage. Except one hundred continental soldiers whom Gist conducted across the swamps, through which the cavalry could not
ton had capitulated found Kalb still in Virginia. In the regular European service he had proved himself an efficient officer; but his mind was neither rapid nor creative, and was unsuited to the exigencies of a campaign in America. On the twentieth of June he entered North Carolina, June 20. and halted at Hillsborough to repose his wayworn soldiers. He found no magazines, nor did the governor of the state much heed his requisitions or his remonstrances. Caswell, who was in command of the mJune 20. and halted at Hillsborough to repose his wayworn soldiers. He found no magazines, nor did the governor of the state much heed his requisitions or his remonstrances. Caswell, who was in command of the militia, disregarded his orders from the vanity of acting separately. Officers of European experience alone, wrote Kalb on the seventh of July to his wife, do not know what it is to contend against difficulties and vexations. My present condition Chap. XV.} 1780. June. makes me doubly anxious to return to you. Yet, under all privations, the officers and men of his command vied with each other in maintaining order and harmony. In his camp at Buffalo ford on Deep river, while he was still d
August 6th (search for this): chapter 16
d commander, who was with Sumpter in the Ca- Chap. XV.} 1780. July 30. tawba settlement. Thus strengthened, Sumpter, on the thirtieth of July, made a spirited though unsuccessful attack on Rocky Mount. Having repaired his losses, on the sixth of August he surprised the British post at Aug. 6 Hanging Rock. A regiment of refugees from North Carolina fled with precipitation; their panic spread to the provincial regiment of the prince of Wales, which suffered severely. In the beginning of tAug. 6 Hanging Rock. A regiment of refugees from North Carolina fled with precipitation; their panic spread to the provincial regiment of the prince of Wales, which suffered severely. In the beginning of the action, not one of the Americans had more than ten bullets; before its end, they used the arms and ammunition of the fallen. Among the partisans who were present in this fight was Andrew Jackson, an orphan boy of Scotch-Irish descent, whose hatred of oppression and love of country drove him to deeds beyond his years. Sumpter drew back to the Catawba settlement, and from all parts of South Carolina patriots flocked to his standard. Thus far the south rested on its own exertions. Relying
August 3rd (search for this): chapter 16
he, on the morning of the twenty-seventh July 27. of July, put what he called the grand army on its march by the shortest route to Camden through a barren country which could offer no food but lean cattle, fruit, and unripe maize. On the third of August, the army crossed the Pedee Aug. 3. river, making a junction on its southern bank with Lieutenant-Colonel Porterfield of Virginia, an excellent officer, who had been sent to the relief of Charleston, and had kept his small command on the frAug. 3. river, making a junction on its southern bank with Lieutenant-Colonel Porterfield of Virginia, an excellent officer, who had been sent to the relief of Charleston, and had kept his small command on the frontier of South Carolina, having found means to subsist then and to maintain the appearance of holding that Chap. XV.} 1780. Aug. part of the country. The force of which Gates could dispose was greater than that which could be brought against him; it revived the hopes of the South Carolinians who were writhing under the insolence of an army in which every soldier was a licensed plunderer, and every officer a functionary with power to outlaw peaceful citizens at will. The British commander
t condition Chap. XV.} 1780. June. makes me doubly anxious to return to you. Yet, under all privations, the officers and men of his command vied with each other in maintaining order and harmony. In his camp at Buffalo ford on Deep river, while he was still doubting how to direct his march, he received news of measures adopted by congress for the southern campaign. Washington wished Greene to succeed Lincoln; congress, not asking his advice and not ignorant of his opinion, on the thirteenth of June unanimously ap- 13. pointed Gates to the command of the southern army, and constituted him independent of the commanderin-chief. He received his orders from congress and was to make his reports directly to that body, which bestowed on him unusual powers and all its confidence. He might address himself directly to Virginia and the states beyond it for supplies; of himself alone appoint all staff-officers; and take such measures as he should think most proper for the defence of the so
ial of the principal officers, was by way of Salisbury and Charlotte, through a most fertile, salubrious, and well-cultivated country, inhabited by presbyterians who were heartily attached to the cause of independence, and among whom a post for defence might have been established in case of disaster. But Gates was impatient; and having detached Marion towards the interior of South Carolina to watch the motions of the enemy and furnish intelligence, he, on the morning of the twenty-seventh July 27. of July, put what he called the grand army on its march by the shortest route to Camden through a barren country which could offer no food but lean cattle, fruit, and unripe maize. On the third of August, the army crossed the Pedee Aug. 3. river, making a junction on its southern bank with Lieutenant-Colonel Porterfield of Virginia, an excellent officer, who had been sent to the relief of Charleston, and had kept his small command on the frontier of South Carolina, having found means t
o thus suffered compulsion in the districts bordering on the rivers Tyger and Enoree, waited till his battalion was supplied with arms and ammunition, and then conducted it to its old commander, who was with Sumpter in the Ca- Chap. XV.} 1780. July 30. tawba settlement. Thus strengthened, Sumpter, on the thirtieth of July, made a spirited though unsuccessful attack on Rocky Mount. Having repaired his losses, on the sixth of August he surprised the British post at Aug. 6 Hanging Rock. A thirtieth of July, made a spirited though unsuccessful attack on Rocky Mount. Having repaired his losses, on the sixth of August he surprised the British post at Aug. 6 Hanging Rock. A regiment of refugees from North Carolina fled with precipitation; their panic spread to the provincial regiment of the prince of Wales, which suffered severely. In the beginning of the action, not one of the Americans had more than ten bullets; before its end, they used the arms and ammunition of the fallen. Among the partisans who were present in this fight was Andrew Jackson, an orphan boy of Scotch-Irish descent, whose hatred of oppression and love of country drove him to deeds beyond his
unds of cartridges to a man, they could obtain no more but from their foes; and the arms of the dead and wounded in one engagement must equip them for another. On the rumor of an advancing American army, Rawdon called on all the inhabitants round Camden to join him in arms. One hundred and sixty who refused he shut up during the heat of midsummer in one prison, and loaded more than twenty of them with chains, some of whom were protected by the capitulation of Charleston. On the twelfth day of July, Captain Huck was sent 12. out with thirty-five dragoons, twenty mounted infantry, and sixty militia, on a patrol. His troops were posted in a lane at the village of Cross Roads, near the source of Fishing creek; and women were on their knees to him, vainly begging mercy for their families and their homes; when suddenly Sumpter and his men, though inferior in number, dashed into the lane at both ends, killed the commander, and destroyed nearly all his party. This was the first adva
h captured 15. more than forty British wagons laden with stores, and secured more than a hundred prisoners. On 16. hearing of the misfortunes of the army of Gates, Sumpter retreated slowly and carelessly up the Wateree. On the seventeenth, he remained through 17. the whole night at Rocky Mount, though he knew that the British were on the opposite side of the river, and in possession of boats and the ford. On the eighteenth, he advanced only eight miles; and 18. on the north bank of Fishing creek, at bright midday, his troops stacked their arms; some took repose; some went to the river to bathe; some strolled in search of supplies; and Sumpter himself fell fast Chap. XV.} 1780. Aug. asleep in the shade of a wagon. In this state, a party under Tarleton cut them off from their arms and put them to rout, taking two or three hundred of them captive, and recovering the British prisoners and wagons. On the twentieth, Sumpter rode into Char- 20. lotte alone, without hat or saddle.
otte. The next morning Gates, who was a petty intriguer, not a soldier, left Caswell to rally such troops as might come in; and himself sped to Hillsborough, where the North Carolina legislature was soon to meet, riding altogether more than two hundred miles in three days and a half, and running away from his army so fast and so far that he knew nothing about its condition. Caswell, after spending one day at Charlotte, disobeyed the order, and followed the example of his chief. On the nineteenth, American officers, coming into 19. Charlotte, placed their hopes of a happier turn of events on Sumpter, who commanded the largest American force that now remained in the Carolinas. That detachment had on the fifteenth captured 15. more than forty British wagons laden with stores, and secured more than a hundred prisoners. On 16. hearing of the misfortunes of the army of Gates, Sumpter retreated slowly and carelessly up the Wateree. On the seventeenth, he remained through 17. the
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