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ept out scouts on every side, scorning surprise; and on the second of October one of them brought him news 2. that rejoiced his heart, that one-half of the whole population beyond the mountains were drawing near. Following a path between King's Mountain and the main ridge of the Alleghanies, the western army, so they called themselves, under Campbell, already more than thirteen hundred strong, marched Chap. XVI.} 1780. Oct. 6. to the Cowpens on Broad river, where, on the evening of the sixth, they were joined by Williams with four hundred men. From Williams they learned nearly where Ferguson's party was encamped; and a council of the principal officers decided to go that very night to strike them by surprise. For this end they picked out nine hundred of their best horsemen; at eight o'clock on that same evening they began their march. Riding all night, with the moon two days past its first quarter, on the afternoon of the seventh they were at the foot of King's Mountain. 7.
efforts. It encouraged Virginia to devote her resources to the country south of her border. The appearance on the frontiers of a numerous enemy from settlements beyond the mountains, whose very names had been unknown to the British, took Cornwallis by surprise, and their success was fatal to his intended expedition. He had hoped to step with ease from one Carolina to the other, and from these to the conquest of Virginia; and he had now no choice but to retreat. On the evening of the fourteenth, his troops began 14. their march back from Charlotte to the Catawba ford. The men of Mecklenburg and Rowan counties had disputed his advance; they now harassed his foraging parties, intercepted his despatches, and cut off his communications. Soldiers of the militia. Chap. XVI.} 1780. Oct. hung on his rear. Twenty wagons were captured, laden with stores and the knapsacks of the light infantry legion. Single men would ride within gunshot of the retreating army, discharge their rifles
e to bloodshed, never wreaking vengeance nor suffering those around him to do so, scrupulously respecting private property, he had the love and confidence of all people in that part of the country. Tarleton's legion had laid it waste to inspire terror; and, in unrestrained freedom of motion, partisans gathered round Marion to redeem their land. A body of three hundred royalist militia and two hundred regular troops had established a post at Musgrove's Mills on the Enoree river. On the eighteenth Aug. 18. of August they were attacked by inferior numbers under Williams of Ninety-Six, and routed with sixty killed and more than that number wounded. Williams lost but eleven. Fanning's Narrative, 12. At dawn of the twentieth, a party, convoying a 20. hundred and fifty prisoners of the Maryland line, were crossing the great Savannah near Nelson's ferry on the Santee, on the route from Camden to Charleston, when Marion and his men sprang upon the guard, liberated the prisoners,
inspire terror; and, in unrestrained freedom of motion, partisans gathered round Marion to redeem their land. A body of three hundred royalist militia and two hundred regular troops had established a post at Musgrove's Mills on the Enoree river. On the eighteenth Aug. 18. of August they were attacked by inferior numbers under Williams of Ninety-Six, and routed with sixty killed and more than that number wounded. Williams lost but eleven. Fanning's Narrative, 12. At dawn of the twentieth, a party, convoying a 20. hundred and fifty prisoners of the Maryland line, were crossing the great Savannah near Nelson's ferry on the Santee, on the route from Camden to Charleston, when Marion and his men sprang upon the guard, liberated the prisoners, and captured twenty-six of the escort. Colonel Marion, wrote Cornwallis, so wrought on the minds of the people, that there was scarcely an inhabitant between the Pedee and the Santee that was not in arms against us. Some parties even
nd yet, in return for their exertions, they were treated with derision and even beaten by insolent British officers. After a march of fifteen days, the army encamped at Winnsborough, an intermediate station between Camden and Ninety-Six. All the while Marion had been on the alert. hundred tories had been sent in September to sur- Sept. prise him; and with but fifty-three men he first surprised a part of his pursuers, and then drove the main body to flight. At Black Mingo, on the twenty-eighth, he made a 28. successful attack on a guard of sixty militia, and took prisoners those who were under its escort. The Brit- Chap. XVI.} 1780. Oct. ish were burning houses on Little Pedee, and he permitted his men of that district to return to protect their wives and families; but he would not suffer retaliation, and wrote with truth: There is not one house burned by my orders or by any of my people. It is what I detest, to distress poor women and children. I most sincerely hope y
25. day—each man mounted on his own horse, armed 26. with his own rifle, and carrying his own store of provisions—they began the ride over the mountains, where the passes through the Alleghanies are the highest. Not even a bridle-path led through the forest, nor was there a house for forty miles between the Watauga and the Catawba. The men left their families in secluded valleys, distant one from the other, exposed not only to parties of royalists, but of Indians. In the evening of the thirtieth, they 30. formed a junction with the regiment of Colonel Ben- Chap. XVI.} 1780. Oct. 1. jamin Cleaveland, consisting of three hundred and fifty men from the North Carolina counties of Wilkes and Surrey. The next day Macdowell was despatched to request Gates to send them a general officer; till he should arrive, Campbell was chosen to act as commandant. Ferguson, who had pursued the party of Macdowell to the foot of the Alleghanies, and had spread the terror of invasion beyond them,
wreaking vengeance nor suffering those around him to do so, scrupulously respecting private property, he had the love and confidence of all people in that part of the country. Tarleton's legion had laid it waste to inspire terror; and, in unrestrained freedom of motion, partisans gathered round Marion to redeem their land. A body of three hundred royalist militia and two hundred regular troops had established a post at Musgrove's Mills on the Enoree river. On the eighteenth Aug. 18. of August they were attacked by inferior numbers under Williams of Ninety-Six, and routed with sixty killed and more than that number wounded. Williams lost but eleven. Fanning's Narrative, 12. At dawn of the twentieth, a party, convoying a 20. hundred and fifty prisoners of the Maryland line, were crossing the great Savannah near Nelson's ferry on the Santee, on the route from Camden to Charleston, when Marion and his men sprang upon the guard, liberated the prisoners, and captured twenty-si
August 18th (search for this): chapter 17
hed, never wreaking vengeance nor suffering those around him to do so, scrupulously respecting private property, he had the love and confidence of all people in that part of the country. Tarleton's legion had laid it waste to inspire terror; and, in unrestrained freedom of motion, partisans gathered round Marion to redeem their land. A body of three hundred royalist militia and two hundred regular troops had established a post at Musgrove's Mills on the Enoree river. On the eighteenth Aug. 18. of August they were attacked by inferior numbers under Williams of Ninety-Six, and routed with sixty killed and more than that number wounded. Williams lost but eleven. Fanning's Narrative, 12. At dawn of the twentieth, a party, convoying a 20. hundred and fifty prisoners of the Maryland line, were crossing the great Savannah near Nelson's ferry on the Santee, on the route from Camden to Charleston, when Marion and his men sprang upon the guard, liberated the prisoners, and captur
t the whole country seemed upon the eve of a revolt. In the second week of September, when the heats Sept. of summer had abated, the earlier cereal grains had beSept. of summer had abated, the earlier cereal grains had been harvested and the maize was nearly ripe, Cornwallis began his projected march. He relied on the loyalists of North Carolina to recruit his army. On his left, Mae. With a corps of one hundred provincials and one hundred Chap. XVI.} 1780. Sept. Cherokees, Brown maintained a position on Garden Hill for nearly a week, when hrmy at bay. From Charlotte Cornwallis pursued his course Chap. XVI.} 1780. Sept. towards Salisbury. Meantime, the fugitives under Macdowell recounted the sorro All the while Marion had been on the alert. hundred tories had been sent in September to sur- Sept. prise him; and with but fifty-three men he first surprised a pSept. prise him; and with but fifty-three men he first surprised a part of his pursuers, and then drove the main body to flight. At Black Mingo, on the twenty-eighth, he made a 28. successful attack on a guard of sixty militia, a
September 16th (search for this): chapter 17
r of the people; and for himself and for his state would admit no doubt that, in spite of all disasters, a continued vigorous resistance would bring the war to a happy issue. At Waxhaw, Cornwallis halted for a few days, and, Chap. XVI.} 1780 Sept. 16. that he might eradicate the spirit of patriotism from South Carolina before he passed beyond its borders, he, on the sixteenth day of September, sequestered by proclamation all estates belonging to the friends of America, and appointed a commissixteenth day of September, sequestered by proclamation all estates belonging to the friends of America, and appointed a commissioner for the seizure of such estates, both real and personal. The concealment, removal, or injury of property doomed to confiscation, was punishable as an abetting of rebellion. The sequestration extended to debts due to the person whose possessions were confiscated; and, to prevent collusive practices, a great reward was offered to those who should make discovery of the concealment of negroes, horses, cattle, plate, household furniture, books, bonds, deeds, and other property. To patriots
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