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Browsing named entities in a specific section of George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10. Search the whole document.

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Concord, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
1780. Oct. of the gallows at Camden, Ninety-Six, and Augusta. At once Campbell intervened, and in general orders, by threatening the delinquents with certain and effectual punishment, secured protection to the prisoners. Campbell's General Orders, 11 Oct., 1780. Just below the forks of the Catawba the tidings of the defeat reached Tarleton; his party in all haste rejoined Cornwallis. The victory at King's Mountain, which in the spirit of the American soldiers was like the rising at Concord, in its effects like the successes at Bennington, changed the aspect of the war. The loyalists of North Carolina no longer dared rise. It fired the patriots of the two Carolinas with fresh zeal. It encouraged the fragments of the defeated and scattered American army to seek each other and organize themselves anew. It quickened the North Carolina legislature to earnest efforts. It encouraged Virginia to devote her resources to the country south of her border. The appearance on the front
Patrick Henry (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
worst character who sought his standard for safety and the chances of plundering with impunity. The Cherokees had been encouraged during the summer to join insurgent loyalists in ravaging the American settlements west of the mountains as far as Chiswell's lead mines. Against this danger, Jefferson organized, in the south-western counties of the state of which he was the governor, a regiment of four hundred backwoodsmen under the command of Colonel William Campbell, brother-in-law of Patrick Henry; and in an interview with William Preston, the lieutenant of Washington county, as the southwest of Virginia was then called, he dwelt on the resources of the country, the spirit of congress, and the character of the people; and for himself and for his state would admit no doubt that, in spite of all disasters, a continued vigorous resistance would bring the war to a happy issue. At Waxhaw, Cornwallis halted for a few days, and, Chap. XVI.} 1780 Sept. 16. that he might eradicate the
Green (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
his wounded to the mercy of the victor. The loss of Sumpter was very small; but being himself disabled by a severe wound, he crossed the Tyger, taking his wounded men with Chap. XVI.} 1780. him. By the lavish distribution of presents, the Indian agents obtained promises from the chiefs of twentyfive hundred Cherokees, and a numerous body of Creeks to lay waste the settlements on the Watauga, Holstein, Kentucky, and Nolachuckie, and even to extend their ravages to the Cumberland and Green rivers; so that the attention of the mountaineers might be diverted to their own immediate concerns. Moreover, Cornwallis gave orders to the reenforce-ment of three thousand sent by Clinton into the Chesapeake to embark for Cape Fear river. So ended the first attempt of Cornwallis to penetrate to Virginia. He was driven back by the spontaneous risings of the southern and south-western people; and the unwholesome exhalations of autumn swept men from every garrison in the low country faster tha
Savannah (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
way to Augusta to receive the presents which were to stimulate their activity. Aware of their coming, Clark, a fugitive from Georgia, forced his way back with one hundred riflemen; having joined to them a body of woodsmen, he defeated the British garrison under Colonel Brown at Augusta, and captured the costly presents designed for the Cherokees. The moment was critical; for Cornwallis, in his eagerness to draw strength to his own army, had not left a post or a soldier between Augusta and Savannah, and the alienated people had returned most reluctantly to a state of obedience. With a corps of one hundred provincials and one hundred Chap. XVI.} 1780. Sept. Cherokees, Brown maintained a position on Garden Hill for nearly a week, when he was rescued by Cruger from Ninety-Six. At his approach, the Americans retired. On the pursuit some of them were scalped and some taken prisoners. Of the latter, Captain Ashby and twelve others were hanged under the eyes of Brown; thirteen who were
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
to its allegiance. He was made to believe that North Carolina would rise to welcome him, and, in the train ofprojected march. He relied on the loyalists of North Carolina to recruit his army. On his left, Major Patricty militia from Burk and Rutherford counties in North Carolina, pursued them to the foot of the mountains, andommanded by Colonel William Richardson Davie of North Carolina. The general rode up in person, and the Americ. An express was sent to Colonel Cleaveland of North Carolina; and all were to meet at Burk county court-housies under Campbell, Shelby, and Sevier, and the North Carolina fugitives under Macdowell, assembled on the twesisting of three hundred and fifty men from the North Carolina counties of Wilkes and Surrey. The next day Mach rises a mile and a half south of the line of North Carolina, is the termination of a ridge that branches frchanged the aspect of the war. The loyalists of North Carolina no longer dared rise. It fired the patriots of
Broad River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
ess of Ninety-Six; Ferguson was more adventurous, having always the army of Cornwallis on his right. On the waters of Broad river his party encountered Macdowell with one hundred and sixty militia from Burk and Rutherford counties in North Carolinalves, under Campbell, already more than thirteen hundred strong, marched Chap. XVI.} 1780. Oct. 6. to the Cowpens on Broad river, where, on the evening of the sixth, they were joined by Williams with four hundred men. From Williams they learned neinst him. After a march of twenty-four miles with mounted Chap. XVI.} 1780. Nov. infantry, Wemyss reached Fishdam on Broad river, the camp of General Sumpter, and at the head of his corps charged the picket. The attack was repelled; he himself waman who was their prisoner. The position of the British in the upper country became precarious. Sumpter passed the Broad river, formed a junction with Clark and Brennan, and threatened Ninety-Six. Tarleton was therefore suddenly recalled from t
Enoree (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
right, humane, averse to bloodshed, never wreaking vengeance nor suffering those around him to do so, scrupulously respecting private property, he had the love and confidence of all people in that part of the country. Tarleton's legion had laid it waste to inspire terror; and, in unrestrained freedom of motion, partisans gathered round Marion to redeem their land. A body of three hundred royalist militia and two hundred regular troops had established a post at Musgrove's Mills on the Enoree river. On the eighteenth Aug. 18. of August they were attacked by inferior numbers under Williams of Ninety-Six, and routed with sixty killed and more than that number wounded. Williams lost but eleven. Fanning's Narrative, 12. At dawn of the twentieth, a party, convoying a 20. hundred and fifty prisoners of the Maryland line, were crossing the great Savannah near Nelson's ferry on the Santee, on the route from Camden to Charleston, when Marion and his men sprang upon the guard, libe
Winnsborough (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
whom were mounted, the army would not have been supported in the field; and yet, in return for their exertions, they were treated with derision and even beaten by insolent British officers. After a march of fifteen days, the army encamped at Winnsborough, an intermediate station between Camden and Ninety-Six. All the while Marion had been on the alert. hundred tories had been sent in September to sur- Sept. prise him; and with but fifty-three men he first surprised a part of his pursuers, from another quarter. Sumpter had rallied the patriots in the country above Camden, and in frequent skirmishes kept the field. Mounting his partisans, he intercepted British supplies of all sorts, and sent parties within fourteen miles of Winnsborough. Having ascertained the number and position of his troops, Cornwallis despatched a party under Major Wemyss against him. After a march of twenty-four miles with mounted Chap. XVI.} 1780. Nov. infantry, Wemyss reached Fishdam on Broad river,
Washington county (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
ring with impunity. The Cherokees had been encouraged during the summer to join insurgent loyalists in ravaging the American settlements west of the mountains as far as Chiswell's lead mines. Against this danger, Jefferson organized, in the south-western counties of the state of which he was the governor, a regiment of four hundred backwoodsmen under the command of Colonel William Campbell, brother-in-law of Patrick Henry; and in an interview with William Preston, the lieutenant of Washington county, as the southwest of Virginia was then called, he dwelt on the resources of the country, the spirit of congress, and the character of the people; and for himself and for his state would admit no doubt that, in spite of all disasters, a continued vigorous resistance would bring the war to a happy issue. At Waxhaw, Cornwallis halted for a few days, and, Chap. XVI.} 1780 Sept. 16. that he might eradicate the spirit of patriotism from South Carolina before he passed beyond its borders,
disproportioned to the service for which they were required. We are come to the series of events which closed the American contest and restored peace to the world. In Europe the sovereigns of Prussia, of Austria, of Russia, were offering their mediation; the united Netherlands were struggling to preserve their neutrality; France was straining every nerve to cope with her rival in the four quarters of the globe; Spain was exhausting her resources for the conquest Chap. XVI.} 1780. of Gibraltar; but the incidents which overthrew the ministry of North, and reconciled Great Britain to America, had their springs in South Carolina. Cornwallis, elated with success and hope, prepared for the northward march which was to conduct him from victory to victory, till he should restore all America south of Delaware to its allegiance. He was made to believe that North Carolina would rise to welcome him, and, in the train of his flatterers, he carried Martin, its former governor, who was to
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