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Petersburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
from those who are not by profession obliged to it. Our force, from your own observation, is totally inadequate to our safety. Washington to the committee in camp in Marshall, i. 362. On the nineteenth of June, two days after his 19. arrival in New York, Clinton repaired to New Jersey. He had now at his disposition nearly four times as many regular troops as were opposed to him; but he fretted at the move in Jersey as premature, and what he least expected. Ms. note of Clinton to Stedman's History, II. 213. With civil words to the German officers, he resolved to give up the expedition; but he chose to mask his retreat by a feint, and to give it the air of a military manoeuvre. Troops sent up the Hudson river as if to take the Americans in the rear induced Washington to move his camp to Rockaway bridge, confiding the post at Short Hills to two brigades under the command of Greene. Early on the twenty-third, the British Chap. XVIII.} 1780. June 23. advanced in two compact
Haverstraw Bay (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
eemingly authorized by the American commanderin-chief. Time pressed on. Besides; Sir George Rodney had only looked in upon New York, and would soon return to the West Indies. On the evening of the eighteenth, Arnold, giving information that Washing- Chap. XVIII.} 1780. Sept. 18. ton on the following Saturday night was expected to be his guest at West Point, proposed that Andre should immediately come up to the Vulture, ship of war, which rode at anchor just above Teller's point, in Haverstraw bay, promising on Wednesday evening to send a person on board with a boat and a flag of truce. This letter of Arnold reached Clinton on Tuesday 19. evening, and he took his measures without delay. Troops were embarked on the Hudson river under the superintendence of Sir George Rodney, and the embarkation disguised by a rumor of an intended expedition into the Chesapeake. On the morning of the twentieth, the British ad- 20. jutant-general, taking his life in his hand, prepared to car
North America (search for this): chapter 19
in concert with Clinton, and supported by the New York delegation in congress, Arnold, pleading his wounds as an excuse for declining active service, solicited and obtained orders to that post, which included all the American forts in the Highlands. Clinton entered with all his soul into the ignoble plot which, as he believed, was to end the war. After a correspondence of two months between him and the British commander-in-chief, through Major John Andre, adjutant-general of the army in North America, on the thirtieth of August, Arnold, Aug. 30. insisting that the advantages which he expected to gain for himself by his surrender were by no means unreasonable, and requiring that his conditions should be clearly understood, laid a plan for an interview at which a person fully authorized was to close with his proposals. The rendezvous was given by him within the American lines, where Colonel Sheldon held the command; and that officer was instructed to expect the arrival at his quart
Kingsbridge (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
ommando ereignet hat. The refugees insisted that the men of New Jersey, weary Chap. XVIII.} 1780. May. of compulsory requisitions of supplies, longed to return to their old form of government; and English generals reported so great disaffection among the starved and half-clothed American officers and men, that one-half of them would desert to the English and the other half disperse. The moment seemed opportune for setting up the royal standard in New Jersey. Strengthening the post at Kingsbridge, and leaving only three regiments in New York, Knyphausen formed nineteen regiments into three divisions under Robertson, Tryon, and Stachenberg, with an advanced guard under General Matthews. Of artillery he took eight pieces. The army of Washington was encamped at Morristown. On the east of the Passaic, the Jersey brigade under General Maxwell was stationed at Connecticut Farms, and three hundred of the Jersey militia occupied Elizabethtown. On the sixth of June, the Brit- June 6
Huntingdon, Pa. (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
t would have justified the promptest action; but, to prevent all possibility of complaint from any quarter, he was, on the twenty-ninth, brought before a numerous and very able board of 29. officers. On his own confession and without the examination of a witness, the board, on which sat Greene, second only to Washington in the service; St. Clair, afterwards president of congress; Lafayette, of the French army; Steuben, from the staff of Frederic the Second; Parsons, Clinton, Glover, Knox, Huntingdon, and others, all well known for their uprightness,—made their unanimous report that Major Andre, adjutant-general of the British army, ought to be considered as a spy from the enemy and to suffer death. Throughout the inquiry Andre was penetrated with the liberality of the members of the court, who showed him every mark of indulgence, and required him to answer no interrogatory which could even embarrass his feelings. Hamilton, i. 178. He acknowledged their generosity in the strongest
Short Hills (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
gular troops as were opposed to him; but he fretted at the move in Jersey as premature, and what he least expected. Ms. note of Clinton to Stedman's History, II. 213. With civil words to the German officers, he resolved to give up the expedition; but he chose to mask his retreat by a feint, and to give it the air of a military manoeuvre. Troops sent up the Hudson river as if to take the Americans in the rear induced Washington to move his camp to Rockaway bridge, confiding the post at Short Hills to two brigades under the command of Greene. Early on the twenty-third, the British Chap. XVIII.} 1780. June 23. advanced in two compact divisions from Elizabethtown Point to Springfield. The column on the right had to ford the river before they could drive Major Lee from one of the bridges over the Passaic. At the other, Colonel Angel with his regiment held the left column in check for about forty minutes. Greene prepared for action; but the British army, though it was drawn up and
Morristown (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
American officers and men, that one-half of them would desert to the English and the other half disperse. The moment seemed opportune for setting up the royal standard in New Jersey. Strengthening the post at Kingsbridge, and leaving only three regiments in New York, Knyphausen formed nineteen regiments into three divisions under Robertson, Tryon, and Stachenberg, with an advanced guard under General Matthews. Of artillery he took eight pieces. The army of Washington was encamped at Morristown. On the east of the Passaic, the Jersey brigade under General Maxwell was stationed at Connecticut Farms, and three hundred of the Jersey militia occupied Elizabethtown. On the sixth of June, the Brit- June 6. ish landed at Elizabethtown Point, but very slowly, from a scarcity of boats. The brigadier who commanded the vanguard was early wounded and disabled. Seven hours were lost in bridging a marsh which stopped their way. On the morning of the seventh, the American militia, under Co
Springfield, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
hurch at Newark had in like manner been burned to the ground. From Connecticut Farms, Maxwell, with the remnant of a brigade, retreated to strong ground near Springfield, where he awaited and repelled repeated attacks made by Colonel Wurmb with a Hessian regiment. Thrice did the Americans charge with fixed bayonets; and they render the command of Greene. Early on the twenty-third, the British Chap. XVIII.} 1780. June 23. advanced in two compact divisions from Elizabethtown Point to Springfield. The column on the right had to ford the river before they could drive Major Lee from one of the bridges over the Passaic. At the other, Colonel Angel with hion; but the British army, though it was drawn up and began a heavy cannonade, had no design to engage; and at four in the afternoon, after burning the houses in Springfield, it began its return. All the way back to Elizabethtown, it was annoyed by an incessant fire from American skirmishers and militia. Its total loss is not know
Barbados (Barbados) (search for this): chapter 19
n of Gibraltar, and relieved Minorca, on the thirteenth Feb. 13. of February he set sail for the West Indies. At St. Lucie he received letters from his wife, saying: Everybody is beyond measure delighted as well as astonished at your success; from his daughter: Everybody almost adores you, and every mouth is full of your praise; come back when you have done some more things in that part of the world you are in now. The thanks of both houses of parliament reached April and May. him at Barbadoes. In April and May, Rodney had twice or thrice encounters with the French fleet of Admiral Guichen, and with such success that in a grateful mood the British parliament thanked him once more. Yet he did not obtain a decided superiority in the West Indian seas, and he reported to the admiralty as the reason, that his flag had not been properly supported by some of his officers. With indifference to neutral rights, he sent frigates to seize or destroy all American vessels in St. Eustatiu
Fort Defiance (Arizona, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
-pieces to bear on the Vulture; and Arnold, as he looked out from the window, saw her compelled to shift her anchorage. The negotiations of the two parties continued for several hours. Clinton was in person to bring his army to the siege of Fort Defiance, which enclosed about seven acres of land. The garrison was to be so distributed as to destroy its efficiency. Arnold was to send immediately to Washington for aid, and to surrender the place in time for Sir Henry Clinton to make arrangemenand valleys and the deep river in exceeding beauty; and he had selected for fortification the points best adapted to command the passage. In 1778, it was still a desert, nearly inaccessible; now it was covered with fortresses and artillery. Fort Defiance alone was defended by a hundred and twenty pieces of cannon, and was believed to be impregnable. Here were magazines of powder and ammunition, completely filled, for the use not of the post only, but of the whole army. The fortifications bu
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