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St. Christopher (Saint Kitts and Nevis) (search for this): chapter 21
h was their convoy. The Dutch flag was kept flying on the island, and decoyed no less than seventeen ships into the port after its capture. Three large ships from Amsterdam, laden with all kinds of naval stores, were taken and carried into St. Christopher. At St. Eustatius, in the order of sale, English stores were, for form's sake, excepted; but all property was seized, and the confiscation was general without discrimination between friend and foe, between neutral powers and belligerents, between Dutch and British. A remonstrance from British merchants, written by the king's solicitor-general in St. Christopher, Rodney scorned to read, and Chap. XX.} 1781. Feb. 3. answered: The island of St. Eustatius is Dutch; everything in it is Dutch; everything is under the protection of the Dutch flag, and as Dutch it shall be treated. Besides St. Eustatius, all the settlements of the republic in South America were taken during the season. The undefended Cape of Good Hope, the half-wa
Lisbon, Grafton County, New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
or., IV. 473. Influenced by the preponderating members of the republic, the stadholder addressed a representation to the empress of Russia for concert in the defence of neutral flags. Before it had been received at Petersburg, Prince Galitzin, the Russian envoy at the Hague, on the third of April invited the states-gen- April 3. eral to a union for the protection of neutral trade and navigation. The same invitation, said the envoy, has been made to the courts of Copenhagen, Stockholm, and Lisbon, in order that by the joint endeavors of all neutral maritime powers a natural system, founded on justice, may be established as a rule for future ages. The states-general desired to join in the defensive association, but the stadholder, under English influence, contrived to make delay. England acted promptly. On the seventeenth, an 17. order of the sing in council suspended all treaties between the two countries, and threw back the Netherlands upon their rights under the law of nation
Russia (Russia) (search for this): chapter 21
d, proclaimed the principles of the empress of Russia, and afterwards included them in their treatierevent the association of the Netherlands with Russia at all hazards. Welderen to Fagel, 2 May, 1accept or dismiss the new-fangled doctrines of Russia. I was instructed secretly to oppose, but avoday confirmed the declaration by a treaty with Russia. On the twenty-first of July, Gustavus set foenmark and Russia, and Denmark to that between Russia and Sweden. The three powers agreed to supporn, confirmed in June, 1783, by its treaty with Russia. 1783. Every considerable power on the contd the rules of navigation which the empress of Russia had promulgated; yet Great Britain, which had ission to Great Britain or an association with Russia. The draft of the convention which the empreswho were all the time seeking an alliance with Russia, disliked the appearance of going to war with who are for concluding a neutral alliance with Russia, nor blame a vote of convoy from which masts a[11 more...]
South America (search for this): chapter 21
ut discrimination between friend and foe, between neutral powers and belligerents, between Dutch and British. A remonstrance from British merchants, written by the king's solicitor-general in St. Christopher, Rodney scorned to read, and Chap. XX.} 1781. Feb. 3. answered: The island of St. Eustatius is Dutch; everything in it is Dutch; everything is under the protection of the Dutch flag, and as Dutch it shall be treated. Besides St. Eustatius, all the settlements of the republic in South America were taken during the season. The undefended Cape of Good Hope, the half-way house on the voyage to India; the feebly garrisoned Negapatam; and the unique harbor of Trincomalee on Ceylon,—were all of them most desirable objects for Great Britain. The Dutch republic was relatively weak; yet, if her finances were impaired, it was by debts contracted during her alliance with England and in rendering service to that power. England lost, for the time, its remaining influence on the conti
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 21
Chapter 20: Great Britain Makes war on the Netherlands. 1780-1781. the successor of Lord Weymouth irty years ago, to dictate laws of navigation to Great Britain. And Lord Camden condemned the declaration of t light that Bernstorff in a separate treaty with Great Britain had compromised the rule on contraband, the miniwhich the empress of Russia had promulgated; yet Great Britain, which had met 1780. them without a protest or republic had no part to choose but submission to Great Britain or an association with Russia. The draft of themned the conduct of Amsterdam for the acts which Great Britain resented, and resolved to give to the British go and was designed to conceal the real motives of Great Britain under a cloud of obloquy relating to Amsterdam, offer resistance, ignorant of a rupture between Great Britain and the republic, the governor surrendered his plon,—were all of them most desirable objects for Great Britain. The Dutch republic was relatively weak; yet,
The Hague (Netherlands) (search for this): chapter 21
een received at Petersburg, Prince Galitzin, the Russian envoy at the Hague, on the third of April invited the states-gen- April 3. eral to guided the cabinet of England, wrote to the British ambassador at the Hague: If the states-general proceed, they throw the die and leave us Copenhagen; so that against the return of a favorable answer from the Hague all things might be prepared for receiving the Dutch republic intartling sensation. When the courier from Petersburg arrived at the Hague with the treaty that Panin had drafted, Stormont saw there was noorke to Stormont, 14 Nov., 1780. If a small mob, wrote Yorke from the Hague, receive the deputies of Amsterdam when they next come here, the to Yorke, 16 Dec., 1780. While Yorke was still negotiating at the Hague, British cruisers pounced upon the unsuspecting merchantmen of th fifteen millions of guilders. Four days at least before he left the Hague, a swift cutter was sent to Rodney at Barbadoes with orders, foun
France (France) (search for this): chapter 21
s little whether the blockade be made across the narrows at Dover, or off the harbor at Brest or L'Orient. If you are taken, you are blocked. Great Chap. XX.} 1780. Britain, by her insular position, blocks naturally all the ports of Spain and France. She has a right to avail herself of this position as a gift of Providence. Dip. Cor., IV. 473. Influenced by the preponderating members of the republic, the stadholder addressed a representation to the empress of Russia for concert in the deich he made of his administration Chap. XX.} 1780. to his king he relates: The honor of this successful project has been ascribed to Russia, which in fact lent to it support; but it had its origin in the cabinet of your Majesty. A week later, France, like Spain, acceded to the declaration of Russia. The war in which the king is engaged has no other object than the liberty of the seas. The king believed he had prepared an epoch glorious for his reign, in fixing by his example the rights of
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 21
engaged has no other object than the liberty of the seas. The king believed he had prepared an epoch glorious for his reign, in fixing by his example the rights of neutrals. His hopes have not been deceived. On the fifth of October, the United States of Oct. 5. America in congress, by a resolution which Robert R. Livingston had drafted, proclaimed the principles of the empress of Russia, and afterwards included them in their treaties with the Netherlands, with Sweden, and with Prussia. f Orange. Yet the ministry, who were all the time seeking an alliance with Russia, disliked the appearance of going to war with the republic solely for her intention of Oct. joining the armed neutrality. In October, Henry Laurens, whom the United States had accredited to the Netherlands for the purpose of raising a loan, was taken on his passage to Europe, and among his papers was found the unauthorized project for a treaty, concerted as we have seen between Neufville and William Lee. To Lor
Stockholm (Sweden) (search for this): chapter 21
litzin, the Russian envoy at the Hague, on the third of April invited the states-gen- April 3. eral to a union for the protection of neutral trade and navigation. The same invitation, said the envoy, has been made to the courts of Copenhagen, Stockholm, and Lisbon, in order that by the joint endeavors of all neutral maritime powers a natural system, founded on justice, may be established as a rule for future ages. The states-general desired to join in the defensive association, but the stadhshould be attacked on account of the convention, the other powers were to take her part. A separate article declared the object of the armed neutrality to be the restoration of peace. At the same time couriers were despatched to the courts of Stockholm and Copenhagen; so that against the return of a favorable answer from the Hague all things might be prepared for receiving the Dutch republic into the league of neutral powers. Every step of this negotiation was watched by England, with the
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
sent the case of the Dutch merchant vessels that had been carried into Portsmouth to the court of admiralty; and Sir James Mariott, the judge, thus laid down the law: It imports little whether the blockade be made across the narrows at Dover, or off the harbor at Brest or L'Orient. If you are taken, you are blocked. Great Chap. XX.} 1780. Britain, by her insular position, blocks naturally all the ports of Spain and France. She has a right to avail herself of this position as a gift of Providence. Dip. Cor., IV. 473. Influenced by the preponderating members of the republic, the stadholder addressed a representation to the empress of Russia for concert in the defence of neutral flags. Before it had been received at Petersburg, Prince Galitzin, the Russian envoy at the Hague, on the third of April invited the states-gen- April 3. eral to a union for the protection of neutral trade and navigation. The same invitation, said the envoy, has been made to the courts of Copenhagen, St
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