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or the United States and for each one of them, and acknowledged the hand of a gracious Providence in raising them up so powerful a friend. At Headquarters there seemed to be a hundred chances to one in favor of capturing the garrison on Rhode Island, and thus ending British pretensions to sovereignty over America. Robert Livingston expressed the hope that congress, in treating for peace, would insist on having Canada, Hudson's Bay, the Floridas, and all the continent independent. On the eighth the French fleet, which a whim of 8. Sullivan had detained for ten days in the offing, ran past the British batteries into the harbor of Newport. The landing had been concerted for the tenth; but, learning that the British outpost on the north of the island had been withdrawn, Sullivan, on the morning of the ninth, without notice to d'estaing, crossed 9. with his troops from the side of Tiverton. Scarcely had he done so, when the squadron of Lord Howe, which had been re-enforced from Eng
s exhausted, Chap. V.} 1778. July 2. and the remainder of the war was like the last rebounds of a cannon-ball before it comes to rest. On the second of July, the president and several members of congress met once more in Philadelphia. On the ninth, the articles of confederation, engrossed 9. on parchment, were signed by eight states. On the tenth, congress issued a circular to the other five, 10. urging them to conclude the glorious compact which was to unite the strength, wealth, and cen days in the offing, ran past the British batteries into the harbor of Newport. The landing had been concerted for the tenth; but, learning that the British outpost on the north of the island had been withdrawn, Sullivan, on the morning of the ninth, without notice to d'estaing, crossed 9. with his troops from the side of Tiverton. Scarcely had he done so, when the squadron of Lord Howe, which had been re-enforced from England, was seen to anchor near Point Judith. On the tenth a strong
on-ball before it comes to rest. On the second of July, the president and several members of congress met once more in Philadelphia. On the ninth, the articles of confederation, engrossed 9. on parchment, were signed by eight states. On the tenth, congress issued a circular to the other five, 10. urging them to conclude the glorious compact which was to unite the strength, wealth, and councils of the whole. North Carolina acceded on the twenty-first; Georgia, on the twenty-fourth. New ing of the ninth, without notice to d'estaing, crossed 9. with his troops from the side of Tiverton. Scarcely had he done so, when the squadron of Lord Howe, which had been re-enforced from England, was seen to anchor near Point Judith. On the tenth a strong 10. wind rising from the north-east, d'estaing by the advice of his officers, among whom were Suffren and de Grasse, sailed past the Newport batteries, and in order of battle bore down upon the British squadron. Lord Howe stood to the s
, Philadelphia, 12 August, 1778. On the eighth of July the French fleet, consisting of twelve ships of the line and three frigates, after a rough voyage of nearly ninety days from Toulon, anchored in the bay of Delaware; ten days too late to intercept the inferior squadron of Lord Howe and its multitude of transports on their retreat from Philadelphia. Its admiral, the Count d'estaing, a major-general in the French army, had persuaded Marie Antoinette to propose the expedition. On the eleventh, congress learned from his letters 11. that he was ready to co-operate with the states in the reduction of the British army and navy. The first invitation to a concert of measures revealed the inability of the American people to fulfil their engagements. For want of an organized government congress could do no more than empower Washington to call upon the six states north of the Delaware for aids of militia, while its financial measure was a popular loan to be raised throughout the count
the war was like the last rebounds of a cannon-ball before it comes to rest. On the second of July, the president and several members of congress met once more in Philadelphia. On the ninth, the articles of confederation, engrossed 9. on parchment, were signed by eight states. On the tenth, congress issued a circular to the other five, 10. urging them to conclude the glorious compact which was to unite the strength, wealth, and councils of the whole. North Carolina acceded on the twenty-first; Georgia, on the twenty-fourth. New 21. Jersey demanded for the United States the regula- 24. tion of trade and the ownership of the ungranted north-western domain: but, after unassisted efforts for a more efficient union, the state, on the twentyfifth of the following November, accepted the confederacy without amendment; and on the fifth of May, 1779, the delegates of Delaware did the same. Maryland, which was on all sides precisely limited by its charter,—while Massachusetts, Connec
unds of a cannon-ball before it comes to rest. On the second of July, the president and several members of congress met once more in Philadelphia. On the ninth, the articles of confederation, engrossed 9. on parchment, were signed by eight states. On the tenth, congress issued a circular to the other five, 10. urging them to conclude the glorious compact which was to unite the strength, wealth, and councils of the whole. North Carolina acceded on the twenty-first; Georgia, on the twenty-fourth. New 21. Jersey demanded for the United States the regula- 24. tion of trade and the ownership of the ungranted north-western domain: but, after unassisted efforts for a more efficient union, the state, on the twentyfifth of the following November, accepted the confederacy without amendment; and on the fifth of May, 1779, the delegates of Delaware did the same. Maryland, which was on all sides precisely limited by its charter,—while Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York, Virginia, and
February 2nd (search for this): chapter 6
ace. Edward Gibbon to J. Holroyd, 2 Dec., 1777, and 4 Dec., 1777. The king, in January, 1778, confessed to Lord North: The time may come when it will be wise to abandon all North America but Canada, Nova Scotia, and the Floridas; but then the generality of the nation must see it first in that light. Donne, II. 118. Lord Rockingham was convinced himself and desired to convince the public of the impossibility of going on with the war. Chat. Cor., IV. 488. Donne, II. 123. On the second of February, Fox spoke against its continuance, went over the whole of the American business, and was heard with favor. The ministers said not one word in reply; and on the division several tories voted with him. Donne, II. 123. C. J. Fox to Mr. Fitzpatrick, in Correspondence of C. J. Fox, i. 168. English opinion had by this time resigned itself to the belief that the United States could not be reduced; but as a massive fountain, when its waters are first let loose, rises slowly to its full he
ead Documents, VIII. 752. His attachment to the English increased to a passion on the alliance of America with the French, for whom he cherished implacable hate. Through his interest, and by the blandishments of gifts and pay and chances of revenge, Colonel John Butler lured the Seneca warriors to cross the border of Pennsylvania under the British flag. The party of savages and rangers, numbering between five hundred and seven hundred men, fell down the Tioga river, and on the last day of June hid in 30. the forests above Wyoming. The next day the two July 1. northernmost forts capitulated. The men of Wyoming, old and young, with one regular company, in all hardly more than three hundred, took counsel with one another, and found no hope of deliverance for their families but through a victorious encounter with a foe of twice their number, and more skilful in the woods than themselves. On the third of July, the 3. devoted band, led by Colonel Zebulon Butler, who had just return
Chapter 5: How far America had achieved independence at the time of the French alliance. July—September, 1778. confined between ridges three miles apart, the Chap. V.} 1778. Susquehanna, for a little more than twenty miles, winds through the valley of Wyoming. Abrupt rocks, rent by tributary streams, rise on the east, while the western declivities are luxuriantly fertile. Connecticut, whose charter from Charles the Second was older than that of Pennsylvania, using its prior claim to lands north of the Mamaroneck river, had colonized this beautiful region and governed it as its county of Westmoreland. The settlements, begun in 1754, increased in numbers and wealth till their annual tax amounted to two thousand pounds in Connecticut currency. In the winter of 1776, the people aided Washington with two companies of infantry, though their men were all needed to protect their own homes. Knowing the alliance of the British with the Six Nations, they built a line of ten for
a passion on the alliance of America with the French, for whom he cherished implacable hate. Through his interest, and by the blandishments of gifts and pay and chances of revenge, Colonel John Butler lured the Seneca warriors to cross the border of Pennsylvania under the British flag. The party of savages and rangers, numbering between five hundred and seven hundred men, fell down the Tioga river, and on the last day of June hid in 30. the forests above Wyoming. The next day the two July 1. northernmost forts capitulated. The men of Wyoming, old and young, with one regular company, in all hardly more than three hundred, took counsel with one another, and found no hope of deliverance for their families but through a victorious encounter with a foe of twice their number, and more skilful in the woods than themselves. On the third of July, the 3. devoted band, led by Colonel Zebulon Butler, who had just returned from the continental service, began their march up the river. Th
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