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minians, which seemed to indicate a rejection of the stricter doctrines of predestination. The change was gradual, and at first almost imperceptible. Some of the older ministers were observed to dwell less in their sermons upon the five points of Calvinism and more upon religion as a life rather than a mode of belief, and a greater liberality of thought was allowed. The stricter orthodox became uneasy, and in many of the older churches the division began. Dr. David Osgood was settled in 1774 over what was then the only church in Medford, and continued to be the pastor till his decease, in December, 1822. Undoubtedly, at the time of his settlement, his creed was what was then deemed strictly orthodox, and in a written statement containing his doctrinal views, on accepting the call, he acknowledged his belief in the doctrines specified in the assembly's catechism, which doctrines, said he, I am bound to profess, and as a preacher to teach and inculcate. The opposition to his set
ks, adopted his father's profession, but on the outbreak of the war joined the army, with the rank of lieutenant, and fell on shipboard in the great naval battle of Lake Erie, which gave to our fleet the control of the lakes. In this war eighteen Medford citizens enlisted, two of whom, Edmund Gates and Abiel R. Shed, were killed in battle. Another distinguished son of Medford, Alexander Scammell Brooks, eldest son of Governor Brooks, made a good reputation in this war. Born in Medford in 1777, he entered Harvard College in 1801, and leaving it in 1804 entered the merchant service as a mariner. But the Embargo of 1808, so destructive to the mercantile prosperity of New England, closed that career for a time, but it was renewed soon after, and he returned to his chosen profession. But when the war broke out he received a commission as captain in the army, and remained and did good service in the army as long as he lived. He was brevetted major for gallant conduct at the battle
s non-appearance, was punished by a fine; again, in the summer, for drill; and in the autumn by regiments or brigades, at what was called general muster, for review. This last was a great occasion, in which all the high officials of the military, with their glittering uniforms, and frequently the governor, paraded in all their glory. The plain in the easterly part of Medford, now covered with streets and houses, was frequently the muster-field. Such a company existed in Medford as early as 1781. Until 1804 this company belonged to the First Regiment, First Brigade, and Third Division; then a new regiment was formed, the Fifth, and the company was transferred to it, and from that time I believe that every company formed in Medford, with possibly the exception of one of those raised during the war, has formed a part of the same Fifth Regiment. I would also except the Independent Company organized under the same law of 1785, and with the same standing and liberties as the Boston and
muster-field. Such a company existed in Medford as early as 1781. Until 1804 this company belonged to the First Regiment, First Brigade, and Third Division; then a new regiment was formed, the Fifth, and the company was transferred to it, and from that time I believe that every company formed in Medford, with possibly the exception of one of those raised during the war, has formed a part of the same Fifth Regiment. I would also except the Independent Company organized under the same law of 1785, and with the same standing and liberties as the Boston and the Salem Cadets, belonging to no regiment and having the right of the line at reviews. This company resigned its charter in 1828. You all know the little brick powder-house standing near the top of the hill, just above the house of Mr. A. F. Sise. Within my recollection it was used for the storage of powder and was protected by a lightning-rod. During the war of 1812 the company last mentioned kept guard over it for some weeks.
Some notes of the history of Medford from 1801 to 1851. read before the Medford Historical Society. by Hon. Thomas S. Harlow. I have been requested to speak of the history of Medford during the first half of the present century. An old writer once said, Happy are the people who have no history. This is only another mode of expressing the quiet happiness of the calm, contented life in which so many of our New England towns moved on, with little to record and little to disturb them. Nm, Edmund Gates and Abiel R. Shed, were killed in battle. Another distinguished son of Medford, Alexander Scammell Brooks, eldest son of Governor Brooks, made a good reputation in this war. Born in Medford in 1777, he entered Harvard College in 1801, and leaving it in 1804 entered the merchant service as a mariner. But the Embargo of 1808, so destructive to the mercantile prosperity of New England, closed that career for a time, but it was renewed soon after, and he returned to his chosen pr
l R. Shed, were killed in battle. Another distinguished son of Medford, Alexander Scammell Brooks, eldest son of Governor Brooks, made a good reputation in this war. Born in Medford in 1777, he entered Harvard College in 1801, and leaving it in 1804 entered the merchant service as a mariner. But the Embargo of 1808, so destructive to the mercantile prosperity of New England, closed that career for a time, but it was renewed soon after, and he returned to his chosen profession. But when thtering uniforms, and frequently the governor, paraded in all their glory. The plain in the easterly part of Medford, now covered with streets and houses, was frequently the muster-field. Such a company existed in Medford as early as 1781. Until 1804 this company belonged to the First Regiment, First Brigade, and Third Division; then a new regiment was formed, the Fifth, and the company was transferred to it, and from that time I believe that every company formed in Medford, with possibly the
ipboard in the great naval battle of Lake Erie, which gave to our fleet the control of the lakes. In this war eighteen Medford citizens enlisted, two of whom, Edmund Gates and Abiel R. Shed, were killed in battle. Another distinguished son of Medford, Alexander Scammell Brooks, eldest son of Governor Brooks, made a good reputation in this war. Born in Medford in 1777, he entered Harvard College in 1801, and leaving it in 1804 entered the merchant service as a mariner. But the Embargo of 1808, so destructive to the mercantile prosperity of New England, closed that career for a time, but it was renewed soon after, and he returned to his chosen profession. But when the war broke out he received a commission as captain in the army, and remained and did good service in the army as long as he lived. He was brevetted major for gallant conduct at the battle of Plattsburg, and afterwards received a commission as lieutenant-colonel. He once told me a little incident of his experience
those whom I knew when I became a permanent resident in 1843, scarcely one remains, and some entire families have disappeared. There were really but two events of importance which marked the first half of the century. The first was the war of 1812. At that time Dr. (afterwards Governor) John Brooks, a native of Medford, had at the conclusion of the Revolutionary war returned to the home of his childhood and resumed the practice of his profession, living in the old house which was taken dow in 1828. You all know the little brick powder-house standing near the top of the hill, just above the house of Mr. A. F. Sise. Within my recollection it was used for the storage of powder and was protected by a lightning-rod. During the war of 1812 the company last mentioned kept guard over it for some weeks. Upon the dissolution of this company the members were, under the existing law, enrolled in the militia company under the command of Capt. John Sparrell, whom some of my elder hearers m
ty. So long as there was but one religious society in the town, the town and the parish were one—there was no distinction. The town at its annual meetings voted the appropriations for the minister's salary and the other expenses for support of public worship, and every man was taxed for this purpose according to his means. Religion was an affair of the State. The prevailing doctrine of the churches was the old orthodox Calvinistic creed, but in the early part of the century, perhaps about 1815, this doctrine began to be held with a certain laxity of interpretation by many of the people and not a few of the ministers. Those who wavered were frequently styled Arminians, which seemed to indicate a rejection of the stricter doctrines of predestination. The change was gradual, and at first almost imperceptible. Some of the older ministers were observed to dwell less in their sermons upon the five points of Calvinism and more upon religion as a life rather than a mode of belief, and a
t took an active part; but the period at which its brave and patriotic services were performed covers a later date than that assigned to me to record. I can only say that their valor, their devotion, the patience and the courage with which they underwent the hardships and encountered the dangers of the war, were beyond all praise, and will ever be held in grateful remembrance by their townsmen and their country. I have spoken of Governor Brooks. It was once my good fortune to see him. In 1819, when he was governor and the district (now State) of Maine was a part of Massachusetts, he came down among us to attend, in his capacity of commander-in-chief, the annual militia musters. My father then lived at Castine, and the muster-field was about three miles from the village. He took me, then a lad of hardly seven years, with him, and we walked to the muster. He pointed out to me the governor as he galloped across the field at full speed—alone—to rectify some irregularity, upon a bl
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