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John Brook (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
ent in 1843, scarcely one remains, and some entire families have disappeared. There were really but two events of importance which marked the first half of the century. The first was the war of 1812. At that time Dr. (afterwards Governor) John Brooks, a native of Medford, had at the conclusion of the Revolutionary war returned to the home of his childhood and resumed the practice of his profession, living in the old house which was taken down a few years ago and replaced by the building of the Savings Bank. His second son, John Brooks, adopted his father's profession, but on the outbreak of the war joined the army, with the rank of lieutenant, and fell on shipboard in the great naval battle of Lake Erie, which gave to our fleet the control of the lakes. In this war eighteen Medford citizens enlisted, two of whom, Edmund Gates and Abiel R. Shed, were killed in battle. Another distinguished son of Medford, Alexander Scammell Brooks, eldest son of Governor Brooks, made a good
Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
patriotic services were performed covers a later date than that assigned to me to record. I can only say that their valor, their devotion, the patience and the courage with which they underwent the hardships and encountered the dangers of the war, were beyond all praise, and will ever be held in grateful remembrance by their townsmen and their country. I have spoken of Governor Brooks. It was once my good fortune to see him. In 1819, when he was governor and the district (now State) of Maine was a part of Massachusetts, he came down among us to attend, in his capacity of commander-in-chief, the annual militia musters. My father then lived at Castine, and the muster-field was about three miles from the village. He took me, then a lad of hardly seven years, with him, and we walked to the muster. He pointed out to me the governor as he galloped across the field at full speed—alone—to rectify some irregularity, upon a black horse, wearing a three-cornered cocked hat, and a powde
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
and will ever be held in grateful remembrance by their townsmen and their country. I have spoken of Governor Brooks. It was once my good fortune to see him. In 1819, when he was governor and the district (now State) of Maine was a part of Massachusetts, he came down among us to attend, in his capacity of commander-in-chief, the annual militia musters. My father then lived at Castine, and the muster-field was about three miles from the village. He took me, then a lad of hardly seven years parson under the English law, to have a freehold. It was his property, in the enjoyment of which he could not be disturbed. But in the settlement of Mr. Bigelow a novel clause was for the first time in the history of Medford, and perhaps of Massachusetts, introduced, providing that the relation between them might be terminated by either party, upon six months written notice. Mr. Bigelow availed himself of this provision in November, 1825. My first visit to Medford was to my uncle, the Rev
Walnut Hills, Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
always kindly disposed, and took pleasure in allowing his friends to visit his beautiful garden and grounds. We had no steam railroad till 1835, when the Boston & Lowell Railroad was laid out. So little foresight had its projectors as to its future uses and values that it was thought desirable to avoid the towns between the termini and have no way stations. So the road, instead of its natural course through the Mystic valley, was carried at great additional expense through Winter and Walnut hills and away from the centre of the town. When the road was opened, in the spring of 1835, Mr. P. C. Brooks, desirous of giving his townsmen the novelty of riding for the first time on a railroad, arranged with the managers to have the train stop one morning at West Medford and take a party to Lowell and return. I happened to be here on a visit at the time and joined the party of about forty or fifty, not more than two or three of whom had ever travelled by railroad before. Though at th
Fort Erie (Canada) (search for this): chapter 21
Dr. (afterwards Governor) John Brooks, a native of Medford, had at the conclusion of the Revolutionary war returned to the home of his childhood and resumed the practice of his profession, living in the old house which was taken down a few years ago and replaced by the building of the Savings Bank. His second son, John Brooks, adopted his father's profession, but on the outbreak of the war joined the army, with the rank of lieutenant, and fell on shipboard in the great naval battle of Lake Erie, which gave to our fleet the control of the lakes. In this war eighteen Medford citizens enlisted, two of whom, Edmund Gates and Abiel R. Shed, were killed in battle. Another distinguished son of Medford, Alexander Scammell Brooks, eldest son of Governor Brooks, made a good reputation in this war. Born in Medford in 1777, he entered Harvard College in 1801, and leaving it in 1804 entered the merchant service as a mariner. But the Embargo of 1808, so destructive to the mercantile prosperi
South River, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
ears afterwards, two or three private schools of wide reputation. The first of these was kept by Hannah Swan, sister of Dr. Swan, in the large house on Forest street removed a few years ago to make room for the house occupied by J. Manning. After she left, the house was taken by Mr. John Angier, who kept a boarding-school there for many years, and had scholars from other States and from the West Indies. The Misses Bradbury kept an excellent school for young ladies, boarders and others, on South street. Mrs. Russell, mother of the late Governor Russell, told me she attended school there. During the first half of the century, and until the fourteenth amendment of the Constitution in 1855, a majority of voters, instead of a plurality as now, was required for the election of any public officer. The consequence often was that for many public offices there was a failure to elect. For the governor and senators a mode was prescribed for filling the vacancy, but for representatives, i
West Indies (search for this): chapter 21
ficent palaces in which our children now are taught? There were, a little before and for many years afterwards, two or three private schools of wide reputation. The first of these was kept by Hannah Swan, sister of Dr. Swan, in the large house on Forest street removed a few years ago to make room for the house occupied by J. Manning. After she left, the house was taken by Mr. John Angier, who kept a boarding-school there for many years, and had scholars from other States and from the West Indies. The Misses Bradbury kept an excellent school for young ladies, boarders and others, on South street. Mrs. Russell, mother of the late Governor Russell, told me she attended school there. During the first half of the century, and until the fourteenth amendment of the Constitution in 1855, a majority of voters, instead of a plurality as now, was required for the election of any public officer. The consequence often was that for many public offices there was a failure to elect. For t
Castine (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
courage with which they underwent the hardships and encountered the dangers of the war, were beyond all praise, and will ever be held in grateful remembrance by their townsmen and their country. I have spoken of Governor Brooks. It was once my good fortune to see him. In 1819, when he was governor and the district (now State) of Maine was a part of Massachusetts, he came down among us to attend, in his capacity of commander-in-chief, the annual militia musters. My father then lived at Castine, and the muster-field was about three miles from the village. He took me, then a lad of hardly seven years, with him, and we walked to the muster. He pointed out to me the governor as he galloped across the field at full speed—alone—to rectify some irregularity, upon a black horse, wearing a three-cornered cocked hat, and a powdered cue hanging down his back. So much for the military history of Medford. The next matter of special interest in the history of the first half of the centu
Lake City (Florida, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
t time Dr. (afterwards Governor) John Brooks, a native of Medford, had at the conclusion of the Revolutionary war returned to the home of his childhood and resumed the practice of his profession, living in the old house which was taken down a few years ago and replaced by the building of the Savings Bank. His second son, John Brooks, adopted his father's profession, but on the outbreak of the war joined the army, with the rank of lieutenant, and fell on shipboard in the great naval battle of Lake Erie, which gave to our fleet the control of the lakes. In this war eighteen Medford citizens enlisted, two of whom, Edmund Gates and Abiel R. Shed, were killed in battle. Another distinguished son of Medford, Alexander Scammell Brooks, eldest son of Governor Brooks, made a good reputation in this war. Born in Medford in 1777, he entered Harvard College in 1801, and leaving it in 1804 entered the merchant service as a mariner. But the Embargo of 1808, so destructive to the mercantile pr
Plattsburg (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 21
ntered Harvard College in 1801, and leaving it in 1804 entered the merchant service as a mariner. But the Embargo of 1808, so destructive to the mercantile prosperity of New England, closed that career for a time, but it was renewed soon after, and he returned to his chosen profession. But when the war broke out he received a commission as captain in the army, and remained and did good service in the army as long as he lived. He was brevetted major for gallant conduct at the battle of Plattsburg, and afterwards received a commission as lieutenant-colonel. He once told me a little incident of his experience during the war. A company of sailors had been drafted for service in the fleet on the lakes, and were to march under his command from the North End of Boston to go into camp at Roxbury. They marched through Hanover and down Court streets, and on reaching Washington street he gave the order, Right wheel. Whether as sailors they did not understand the order, or the strong breez
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