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Chelsea (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
n-of-war were ordered up these rivers as far as the tide would allow. Cannon were ordered to be placed on Bunker Hill to annoy the enemy if they attempted to go to Medford by water. A company of militia was raised in the town, and was instructed to remain there till further orders, holding themselves ready to march at a minute's notice. The General Court ordered that all the cattle on Hog, Snake, and Noddle's Islands should be driven back into the country. The Selectmen of Malden, Chelsea, Lynn, and Medford were given charge of this work, with authority to draw on the troops quartered in Medford as they might consider necessary. This refers to the New Hampshire men under Sargent and Stark. We have no positive record that the Medford company was under fire at the Battle of Bunker Hill, but we know that after the British landed their regiment was stationed in the road leading to Lechmere Point, and late in the day was ordered to Charlestown. On arriving at Bunker Hill (
Mystick River (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
sidered an active enemy of the Colonies, but the principle of the times was, Who is not for us is against us. After the Battle of Lexington the British were completely surrounded on the land side. They, however, held the harbor and the rivers Mystic and Charles. Men-of-war were ordered up these rivers as far as the tide would allow. Cannon were ordered to be placed on Bunker Hill to annoy the enemy if they attempted to go to Medford by water. A company of militia was raised in the ttate. The negro's name appears on the tax list in 1778. Prince was a negro servant of Stephen Hall, Esq. He married Chloe, the servant of Richard Hall, in 1772. An amusing story is told of Prince's struggle with a sixty-five-pound bass in Mystic river, at low tide. The negro tried to carry the fish to land in his arms. Two trials proved failures, but the third was successful. Prince thought his prize worthy to be presented to the commander at Winter Hill. He dressed the fish, and puttin
White Plains (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
sault, the enemy wavered, and the whole regiment rushed into the fort. The names of the men who made that gallant charge should be cherished in Medford history beside that of their brave leader. They were William Cutter, Francis Tufts, Aaron Tufts, George Tufts, Daniel Bailey, John Le Bosquet, Henry Le Bosquet, and John Le Bosquet, Jr. And just here a Medford tradition must be modified. The History of Medford says that Sergt. Francis Tufts was promoted to adjutant, on the field at White Plains. This cannot be true, for, at that time, he was at Ticonderoga. On Oct. 7, 1777 (the day of the Battle of Stillwater), he was promoted to ensign, so we can save the story, but change the scene. Francis Tufts, at Stillwater, seeing the standard-bearer fall, caught up the flag and holding it high in air bore it at the head of the regiment over the redoubt. He was commissioned ensign that day by General Gates. Afterward he received several promotions and was made adjutant in 1780. T
Hampshire (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 2
Medford—twenty-five per cent. of all the inhabitants of the town in 1776. This does not cover the whole number; for instance, in July, 1776, thirty men went to Ticonderoga, and we have the names of only twelve. The other eighteen were from Hampshire Government. Other recruits were, like these, non-residents, hired to fill up the town's quota, but one hundred eighty-nine have been identified as Medford citizens, or bore surnames common in the town at that time. One hundred were tax-payerd left him, hardly daring to hope that he would come through the action alive. But he did good service that day, and served through the siege. Did the men have all the heroism in those days? The news of the battle flew like wildfire. New Hampshire was aroused, and sent men pouring into Massachusetts. Col. John Stark established headquarters at the Admiral Vernon Tavern, which stood on the east side of Main street, on the corner of Swan street. It was destroyed in the great fire of 1850.
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
778, besides the three years men and the militia guarding troops of Convention at Cambridge, Medford had sixteen men in the Continental Army in New York and Rhode Island. The next year , twenty-two. Seven men, who served for three months in New Jersey, were entirely lost sight of until last October, when an old book and a receipt were discovered at City Hall which gave their names and the amount of bounty paid them. One of them was Hezekiah Blanchard, Jr., the tavern-keeper, who has numerou Savels the soldier has numerous descendants in Medford. Aaron Tufts and William Bucknam were also veterans, and had been honorably discharged from the army six months before. William Polly, a youth of nineteen, had served three months in New Jersey, in 1779. He was a kinsman of William Polly who was shot at Lexington. The youngest in this levy was sixteen years old—Josiah Cutter, 2d. There were seven others under twenty-one. While these men were in service, Arnold's treason and the
Stoneham (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
ments October 30, and sent back supplies, which came none too soon, for the men were in a starving condition. When the remnants of Montgomery's and Arnold's armies appeared before Quebec, Dec. 5, 1775, they were defeated. Although the Cambridge detachment was in the thick of the fight, Joshua Reed and Richard Cole were fortunate to escape capture. The former applied for a bounty coat Jan. 10, 1776, and the latter February 26. Their comrade in Captain Hall's company, Samuel Ingalls, of Stoneham, was not so fortunate. Captain Hall's petition in his favor tells his story: Medford, October 25th, 1776. This may Certifie that Mr. Samoel Engols Belonged To my Company in 1775 and has Bin a presoner in Cannedy and haint Receved No Coate Isaac Hall, Captain. Samuel Ingall's received his coat money, Oct. 30, 1776. While these men were enduring hunger, cold, and pestilence in Canada the army at home were drawing their lines closer and closer around the enemy at Boston.
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
80 six out of fourteen men who enlisted were colored. Thomas Revallean gained his freedom, as a soldier. He came to Medford after the war, and his family lived on Cross street. His wife was a pensioner. Two of his grandsons were taken prisoners, and were held as slaves in Texas for two years and a half, during the Civil War. In 1778, besides the three years men and the militia guarding troops of Convention at Cambridge, Medford had sixteen men in the Continental Army in New York and Rhode Island. The next year , twenty-two. Seven men, who served for three months in New Jersey, were entirely lost sight of until last October, when an old book and a receipt were discovered at City Hall which gave their names and the amount of bounty paid them. One of them was Hezekiah Blanchard, Jr., the tavern-keeper, who has numerous descendants among the people of Medford. The Continental money had depreciated to such an alarming degree that those who were fortunate enough to have anythin
Pine Mountain (Georgia, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
work, some one hears a shot. Hark! Another! Work is suspended and excitement reigns. The drums beat at the barracks, a relief detachment is sent out, and after some sharp firing the enemy retreats under cover of the ships. As the cold weather came on, fuel became scarce in both the Continental and British camps. The English tore down buildings to supply firewood. The people of Medford cut down the white pine trees which his Majesty had reserved for his royal navy and other trees on Pine hill and supplied the Continental army. Thomas Brooks, Esq., furnished the troops on Winter Hill with wood from his own farm. Capt. Isaac Hall and his company enlisted for eight months after the Battle of Lexington. Some of the men never returned to remain permanently in town until the close of the war. Forty-five Medford men, twenty-five of whom were minute-men, belonged to the company. The captain resigned in September, 1775, and formed another company. Each man, on enlistment, wa
, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
er the defeat of the army at Long Island, alarm men were called for. September 23 thirteen men marched to New York, and served about two months. We have not found the name of one of these men. Drafts followed thick and fast. In November and December men were called for. Some of those drawn enlisted for the war. Others paid substitutes. At that time every fifth man was ordered into the army, either for home defence or in New York. Men were suffering from camp distemper at Ticonderoga; Forts Washington and Lee had been evacuated; the time of many of the troops had expired. The outlook was dark. December 3 the voters met at the meeting-house to draft men and raise money. Washington's victory at Trenton revived the courage of the people, and his call for enlistments, for three years or the war, was nobly responded to. A town-meeting was called March 3, 1777, in Medford, to consider means for raising her quota. The people were beginning to feel the stress of poverty, and many were c
Fort Ticonderoga (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
wedding or two occurred. But the thoughts of the people were ever on the war. The knitting-needles were busy, the spinning-wheels were humming, and garments were being made for the soldiers. The men were taking care that the town's stock of powder did not run low. Lieut. Stephen Hall, 4th, and Lieut. Jonathan Porter were keeping the ranks of their company full, and drilling the new recruits who had taken the places of those who entered the army in the spring. July brought bad news. Ticonderoga was evacuated. At first only a rumor, the news was speedily confirmed by a letter from Dr. Osgood's brother, who was one of the garrison. The retreating army was overtaken at Hubbardton, Vt., and there Col. Ebenezer Francis, a Medford boy, whose home was then in Beverly, was killed. He had organized his regiment the previous January, and marched to Bennington; and from there to New York State. On the 25th of September news of the first day's battle at Saratoga came to Medford. It h
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