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Ticonderoga (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
abitants of the town in 1776. This does not cover the whole number; for instance, in July, 1776, thirty men went to Ticonderoga, and we have the names of only twelve. The other eighteen were from Hampshire Government. Other recruits were, like ontributed sums varying from £ 24 to pay. The Canadian army having retired to Crown Point, these recruits were sent to Ticonderoga. After the defeat of the army at Long Island, alarm men were called for. September 23 thirteen men marched to New Yifth man was ordered into the army, either for home defence or in New York. Men were suffering from camp distemper at Ticonderoga; Forts Washington and Lee had been evacuated; the time of many of the troops had expired. The outlook was dark. Deceancis Tufts was promoted to adjutant, on the field at White Plains. This cannot be true, for, at that time, he was at Ticonderoga. On Oct. 7, 1777 (the day of the Battle of Stillwater), he was promoted to ensign, so we can save the story, but cha
John Brook (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
ice from the town was in Gates's army. You who remember the Civil War know the thrill which swept over the town when the news arrived. Little cared the people that day for the disagreements of Arnold and Gates. They asked for the safety of John Brooks, Francis Tufts, John Le Bosquet, and the rest. News came soon which made Medford proud. Lieutenant-Colonel Brooks and his regiment had been the last on the field—not leaving it until eleven o'clock at night. During the evening they had kept Breyman's riflemen at bay. The British had not advanced; the Americans held their own. It is what we expected of John Brooks, his townsmen said, and the Medford boys will follow wherever he leads. October 7th Burgoyne was obliged to fight or retreat. When the battle was at its height, Brooks again distinguished himself. He has been called the Hero of Stillwater. His regiment was ordered to take a redoubt occupied by Breyman. He ordered Captain Bancroft, of Reading, to lead the charge.
Middlesex County (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
nty per cent. Insurance on privateers was effected by making over to the underwriter a certain per cent. of the prize money. In 1776 Captain Hall insured three sloops for one hundred pounds each. Two were lost. The third, the Rover, made a successful cruise, and Mr. Hall received ninety pounds in prize money. The times proved too much for the capitalist before the war was over. In 1784 he said, When the war began, I would not have exchanged property with any man in the county of Middlesex, but now I am worth nothing. As a paper has already been read before you in which Governor Brooks has been spoken of at length, I have devoted very little time to him to-night, but I wish to say that the more I study his military and private life, the more I venerate and admire him. Medford may feel honored for all time, to count among her sons this friend of Lafayette and George Washington. One by one the landmarks of the olden time have disappeared. A few are left—among them th
West Indies (search for this): chapter 2
ng them to trusted patriots, and thereby guarding his widowed mother against trouble from reckless young fellows who were inclined to damage Tory property. Colonel Royall, who had been a member of the Provincial Governor's Council, became panic-stricken when war seemed inevitable. The winter before he nearly made up his mind to stand for his country, but, overruled by his Tory relatives and friends, he lost faith in the American cause. He determined to return to his birthplace at the West Indies, but was prevented by the Battle of Lexington. He was in Boston when the battle occurred. He dared not return home, he dared not stay in the town, so he hastened to Newburyport and took passage for Halifax. From there he went to England. He bitterly repented his course; but he was an absentee, and his property was confiscated. By the good offices of Dr. Simon Tufts his estate was kept together. He died in England in 1781. By will he left a silver cup to the church in Medford.
Rover, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
day, interested in underwriting, and assumed risks individually, as there were no marine insurance companies. Losses were frequent during the war, and the premiums were fabulous,—the usual rate being about forty-five per cent., but in some cases rising to seventy per cent. Insurance on privateers was effected by making over to the underwriter a certain per cent. of the prize money. In 1776 Captain Hall insured three sloops for one hundred pounds each. Two were lost. The third, the Rover, made a successful cruise, and Mr. Hall received ninety pounds in prize money. The times proved too much for the capitalist before the war was over. In 1784 he said, When the war began, I would not have exchanged property with any man in the county of Middlesex, but now I am worth nothing. As a paper has already been read before you in which Governor Brooks has been spoken of at length, I have devoted very little time to him to-night, but I wish to say that the more I study his milita
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 2
towns around the harbor succeeded, that day, in ridding its waters of the last of the fleet. As soon as Boston was evacuated Washington transferred his army to New York, leaving only three regiments on guard. Maj. John Brooks, Thomas Pritchard, and a few others from Medford went with him. At the town-meeting held June 13, 1776, it was unanimously resolved, If the Honorable Continental Congress, for the safety of the United Colonies, declare themselves independent of the Kingdom of Great Britain, the inhabitants of this town will solemnly engage with their lives and fortunes to support the measure. In the Town Records the Declaration of Independence is given in full immediately after the report of this meeting. The document was not received in Medford until September. Sabbath morning, September 8, Parson Osgood read from the pulpit the momentous words which freed the Colonies from the mother country. On the day when the Declaration was adopted the voters of Medford were c
Concord (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
f the Committee of Supplies. Flour, rice, pease, pickaxes, saws, cartridge-paper, and other necessaries were shipped to Concord and Worcester. In November seven cannon were bought, and Mr. Gill and Mr. Benjamin Hall were desired to get them out ediately brought to this town (Cambridge) under direction of Captain Foster. In the following March (1775) Hall sent to Concord 60 bbls. of pork, 50 axes and helves, 50 wheelbarrows, and materials for constructing barracks. The first mention of t from Boston through the day brought vague rumors of another excursion planned by the British. Where were they going? Concord? Which way would they take? were the questions asked in the taverns and streets. Evening brought no definite news. Whand good-by as with gun on his shoulder he rode off toward Lexington. Outstripping those on foot, he pressed forward to Concord, and was in the fight at the bridge. Here he saved the life of Lieut. Edward Thornton Gould, of His Majesty's Eighteent
Lynn (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
r were ordered up these rivers as far as the tide would allow. Cannon were ordered to be placed on Bunker Hill to annoy the enemy if they attempted to go to Medford by water. A company of militia was raised in the town, and was instructed to remain there till further orders, holding themselves ready to march at a minute's notice. The General Court ordered that all the cattle on Hog, Snake, and Noddle's Islands should be driven back into the country. The Selectmen of Malden, Chelsea, Lynn, and Medford were given charge of this work, with authority to draw on the troops quartered in Medford as they might consider necessary. This refers to the New Hampshire men under Sargent and Stark. We have no positive record that the Medford company was under fire at the Battle of Bunker Hill, but we know that after the British landed their regiment was stationed in the road leading to Lechmere Point, and late in the day was ordered to Charlestown. On arriving at Bunker Hill (the real
New York State (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
who had taken the places of those who entered the army in the spring. July brought bad news. Ticonderoga was evacuated. At first only a rumor, the news was speedily confirmed by a letter from Dr. Osgood's brother, who was one of the garrison. The retreating army was overtaken at Hubbardton, Vt., and there Col. Ebenezer Francis, a Medford boy, whose home was then in Beverly, was killed. He had organized his regiment the previous January, and marched to Bennington; and from there to New York State. On the 25th of September news of the first day's battle at Saratoga came to Medford. It had been fought on the 17th. Nearly every man who was in service from the town was in Gates's army. You who remember the Civil War know the thrill which swept over the town when the news arrived. Little cared the people that day for the disagreements of Arnold and Gates. They asked for the safety of John Brooks, Francis Tufts, John Le Bosquet, and the rest. News came soon which made Medfo
Granby (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
dared not stay in the town, so he hastened to Newburyport and took passage for Halifax. From there he went to England. He bitterly repented his course; but he was an absentee, and his property was confiscated. By the good offices of Dr. Simon Tufts his estate was kept together. He died in England in 1781. By will he left a silver cup to the church in Medford. A special act of the Legislature was necessary before it could be delivered. He bequeathed to the town a piece of land in Granby upon which $100 was realized. His estate was not settled until 1805. A man of great hospitality, charity, and charm of manner, Colonel Royall lacked the firmness which the times necessitated. He was never considered an active enemy of the Colonies, but the principle of the times was, Who is not for us is against us. After the Battle of Lexington the British were completely surrounded on the land side. They, however, held the harbor and the rivers Mystic and Charles. Men-of-war we
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