hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Medford (Massachusetts, United States) 457 1 Browse Search
Benjamin Woodbridge 50 2 Browse Search
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) 34 0 Browse Search
Mathew Cradock 33 1 Browse Search
Caleb Brooks 25 3 Browse Search
John Brooks 25 7 Browse Search
Aaron Porter 23 3 Browse Search
Isaac Royall 22 4 Browse Search
Maria Gowen Brooks 22 0 Browse Search
Horace Brooks 21 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 3.. Search the whole document.

Found 746 total hits in 235 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...
Dorchester Heights (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
ition in his favor tells his story: Medford, October 25th, 1776. This may Certifie that Mr. Samoel Engols Belonged To my Company in 1775 and has Bin a presoner in Cannedy and haint Receved No Coate Isaac Hall, Captain. Samuel Ingall's received his coat money, Oct. 30, 1776. While these men were enduring hunger, cold, and pestilence in Canada the army at home were drawing their lines closer and closer around the enemy at Boston. Captain Hall's company was ordered to Dorchester Heights; fifteen men at least were in Capt. Stephen Dana's company at The Lines. Capt. Caleb Brooks was at Prospect Hill. A few other men were at Fort No. 3, March 17, 1776, the enemy, seeing the determined attitude of the Provincials, sailed for Halifax. I suppose this is the origin of the expression, Sent to Halifax. A few sail remained in the bay. Medford men assisted in building fortifications on Noddle's Island, and June 13 were stationed behind them. The united efforts of all t
New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
reet. It was destroyed in the great fire of 1850. Later, he occupied the Royall House. The New Hampshire soldiers assembled in Medford, and enlisted there in the service of Massachusetts Colony. Tw on the troops quartered in Medford as they might consider necessary. This refers to the New Hampshire men under Sargent and Stark. We have no positive record that the Medford company was underegiment to throw up entrenchments there; another detachment went to the rail fence with the New Hampshire men; and a third, with their colonel, went to the redoubt. After the battle they slept on e as to the fate of their own husbands and sons, it was a blessing to do something for their New Hampshire comrades. Among these faithful women was Sarah Bradlee Fulton, who later proved her bravead of night. In 1849 the graves of twenty-five soldiers of the Revolution, supposed to be New Hampshire men, were found on Water street by laborers digging a cellar. The bodies were removed to t
Louisburg (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
s absent father made a lasting impression on the boy's mind. By and by the shots grew fainter, and tired stragglers began to pass. Abigail Brooks had a great iron kettle hung under the elm-tree which you can see to-day, and served chocolate to all who wished it. The stately lady, the granddaughter of Rev. John Cotton, serving these battle-stained men, makes a picture which Medford people cannot afford to forget. Rev. Edward Brooks, the dignified clergyman, Henry Putnam, the veteran of Louisburg, and his grandson, the drummer boy, represent all classes who, as volunteers, hastened to the conflict. Most of them returned, but Henry Putnam gave his life at Menotomy, and tradition says two men named Smith and Francis were victims of the fight. The minute-men brought home one of their number mortally wounded. He was William Polly, the son of Widow Hannah Polly. He was only eighteen years old. Henry Putnam earned the title of lieutenant during the Louisburg campaign. On accoun
Halifax (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
return home, he dared not stay in the town, so he hastened to Newburyport and took passage for Halifax. From there he went to England. He bitterly repented his course; but he was an absentee, an 3, March 17, 1776, the enemy, seeing the determined attitude of the Provincials, sailed for Halifax. I suppose this is the origin of the expression, Sent to Halifax. A few sail remained in thHalifax. A few sail remained in the bay. Medford men assisted in building fortifications on Noddle's Island, and June 13 were stationed behind them. The united efforts of all the towns around the harbor succeeded, that day, in riddi Forge almost unendurable. In February, 1778, Rev. Edward Brooks came home from captivity at Halifax. He had been chaplain of the frigate Hancock, built at Newburyport by order of Congress in Decd to the British fleet. Mr. Brooks was exchanged for Parson Lewis, a British chaplain, and left Halifax on the Favorite, Jan. 29, 1778. While in Nova Scotia he had the small-pox. He was not strong
Chambersburg (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
ick and fast. In November and December men were called for. Some of those drawn enlisted for the war. Others paid substitutes. At that time every fifth man was ordered into the army, either for home defence or in New York. Men were suffering from camp distemper at Ticonderoga; Forts Washington and Lee had been evacuated; the time of many of the troops had expired. The outlook was dark. December 3 the voters met at the meeting-house to draft men and raise money. Washington's victory at Trenton revived the courage of the people, and his call for enlistments, for three years or the war, was nobly responded to. A town-meeting was called March 3, 1777, in Medford, to consider means for raising her quota. The people were beginning to feel the stress of poverty, and many were clamoring for payment of money loaned to the town. The Selectmen were instructed to procure the men at as low bounty as may be. Moses and William Bucknam enlisted on the day of the meeting; five or six had enl
Medford (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
lution. by Helen T. Wild. [Read before The Medford Historical Society, April 18, 1898.] FOR ars between 1775 and 1783. In August, 1774, Medford began to be anxious about her supply of powdes horse. In an instant Revere thought of the Medford road which he had passed a moment before. Suy will he left a silver cup to the church in Medford. A special act of the Legislature was necess had been stolen. They brought him back to Medford and buried him with honors of war. At twil. A town-meeting was called March 3, 1777, in Medford, to consider means for raising her quota. Thy during the preceding month. In July, 1777, Medford had forty-four men in the army for three yearster probably claimed him, and he returned to Medford in the early part of 1778. In June, 1778, hea guarding troops of Convention at Cambridge, Medford had sixteen men in the Continental Army in NeOne-legged Earl. He died in 1821. In 1780 Medford had sixteen six-months' men in the field. Th[52 more...]
Hampshire County (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
when the Declaration was adopted the voters of Medford were conferring about bounty, which was to be paid to thirty men called for to go to Canada. With reports of Canadian defeats, and the personal experiences of their townsmen fresh in their minds, men were slow to come forward, in spite of bounty offered by town and province. Armed with authority to offer £ 8 per man to all who would enlist, and to pay each $2 at time of enlistment, Lieut. Moses Tufts and Samuel Tufts went out into Hampshire County and elsewhere to hire the men. The treasury was empty, and the Town Treasurer was empowered to borrow £ 240 to pay the men. Benjamin Hall loaned £ 66-13-4, Richard Hall, £ 53-6-8, and Stephen Hall, Tertius, £ 120. This did not prove enough, and £ 226-5-4 was raised by private subscription. Seventy-four men contributed sums varying from £ 24 to pay. The Canadian army having retired to Crown Point, these recruits were sent to Ticonderoga. After the defeat of the army at Long Island, a
Richard Cole (search for this): chapter 2
ered 1,300 coats made by a certain pattern, with pewter buttons, on which was stamped the number of the regiment. This was the first attempt at a uniform for the army. Medford women spun, wove, and made 60 of these coats. Two Medford men, Richard Cole and Joshua Reed, Jr., enlisted in September for the ill-fated expedition to Quebec, under Arnold. The troops marched from Cambridge September 13, and camped that night in Medford. They then marched to Newburyport, where they took transports oon, for the men were in a starving condition. When the remnants of Montgomery's and Arnold's armies appeared before Quebec, Dec. 5, 1775, they were defeated. Although the Cambridge detachment was in the thick of the fight, Joshua Reed and Richard Cole were fortunate to escape capture. The former applied for a bounty coat Jan. 10, 1776, and the latter February 26. Their comrade in Captain Hall's company, Samuel Ingalls, of Stoneham, was not so fortunate. Captain Hall's petition in his fav
hovels as they can spare, as it is of importance to the safety of this Colony that the works begun on Winter Hill be finished, and that they will be retarded unless soon supplied with tools. The months between June, 1775, and March, 1776, when Boston was evacuated, were full of alarms. The enemy were expected to march out at any time. General Washington ordered, July 12, that one thousand men should be stationed in and about Medford, considering that number sufficient for the time being. Medford men assisted in building fortifications on Noddle's Island, and June 13 were stationed behind them. The united efforts of all the towns around the harbor succeeded, that day, in ridding its waters of the last of the fleet. As soon as Boston was evacuated Washington transferred his army to New York, leaving only three regiments on guard. Maj. John Brooks, Thomas Pritchard, and a few others from Medford went with him. At the town-meeting held June 13, 1776, it was unanimously reso
t the meeting-house to draft men and raise money. Washington's victory at Trenton revived the courage of the people, and his call for enlistments, for three years or the war, was nobly responded to. A town-meeting was called March 3, 1777, in Medford, to consider means for raising her quota. The people were beginning to feel the stress of poverty, and many were clamoring for payment of money loaned to the town. The Selectmen were instructed to procure the men at as low bounty as may be. Moses and William Bucknam enlisted on the day of the meeting; five or six had enlisted in the artillery during the preceding month. In July, 1777, Medford had forty-four men in the army for three years or the war. The summer passed peacefully at home: the coffeedrinkings, the dinner parties, the weekly lecture, which in those days took the place of the prayer-meeting, went on as usual. Even a wedding or two occurred. But the thoughts of the people were ever on the war. The knitting-needles w
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...