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Pasture Hill (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
up entrenchments there; another detachment went to the rail fence with the New Hampshire men; and a third, with their colonel, went to the redoubt. After the battle they slept on their arms at Prospect Hill. Three Medford men were under Stark: Rev. David Osgood, chaplain; Daniel Reed, drummer; and Robert Bushby. Although Medford was not the scene of battle, she was near enough to experience the excitement and bitterness of war. We can imagine the people huddled in little groups on Pasture Hill, or on the marshes, hearing the boom of cannon, seeing the smoke of burning Charlestown, but, on account of the position of Bunker and Breed's hills, seeing only a part of the actual battle. In the afternoon Major McClary, of Epsom, N. H., came galloping back to town for bandages. He had scant time to answer the numberless questions of the people who crowded around him. Putting spurs to his horse, he hurried back, only to fall a victim to the murderous fire from the ships in the
North Chelsea (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
journal of the day said that to be a private in them was an honor; to be chosen an officer was a mark of highest distinction. Capt. Isaac Hall, the commander of the Medford minute-men, was a brother of Benjamin Hall, the Representative, and Richard Hall, the Town Clerk. He was in business with the former. His lieutenant was Caleb Brooks, brickmaker, a half brother of Dr. John Brooks. Ensign Stephen Hall was the eldest son of Stephen Hall, Tertius. He was born Jan. 3, 1745, and died at Revere in 1817. His granddaughter said of him: I remember my grandfather well; he lived and died at my father's, and I never can forget his life and counsel; he was very exemplary in his daily life, and dearly did I love him; he was a large man of very dignified appearance. Thomas Bradshaw, private, was the proprietor of the Fountain House. His daughter married Thatcher Magoun, Sr. There were nine Tuftses in the company, all kinsmen. Seven of them were voters in 1776-7. James Tufts, Jr., was
Tappan (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
m Polly, a youth of nineteen, had served three months in New Jersey, in 1779. He was a kinsman of William Polly who was shot at Lexington. The youngest in this levy was sixteen years old—Josiah Cutter, 2d. There were seven others under twenty-one. While these men were in service, Arnold's treason and the execution of Andre occurred. The Medford men were stationed on guard duty at North river. William Bucknam was promoted and served as sergeant. His name is on the muster-roll dated Tappan. At this place Andre was executed, and it is probable that Bucknam stood with the troops drawn up to witness the ignoble death of that brave man. When the six-months' men were discharged they were each given a passport bearing the signature of the colonel to show they were not deserters, and to recommend them to the charity of the farmers, whose help they needed. Some barefooted, others nearly so, ragged and dirty, they set out for their walk of over two hundred miles. They were absolut
Epsom (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
Stark: Rev. David Osgood, chaplain; Daniel Reed, drummer; and Robert Bushby. Although Medford was not the scene of battle, she was near enough to experience the excitement and bitterness of war. We can imagine the people huddled in little groups on Pasture Hill, or on the marshes, hearing the boom of cannon, seeing the smoke of burning Charlestown, but, on account of the position of Bunker and Breed's hills, seeing only a part of the actual battle. In the afternoon Major McClary, of Epsom, N. H., came galloping back to town for bandages. He had scant time to answer the numberless questions of the people who crowded around him. Putting spurs to his horse, he hurried back, only to fall a victim to the murderous fire from the ships in the river, as he crossed Charlestown Neck. His retreating comrades found his body, from which his pistols and valuables had been stolen. They brought him back to Medford and buried him with honors of war. At twilight the wounded were bro
Montgomery (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
e ill-fated expedition to Quebec, under Arnold. The troops marched from Cambridge September 13, and camped that night in Medford. They then marched to Newburyport, where they took transports for the Kennebec. On their march through the wilderness they were overtaken by a storm which ruined a large part of their provisions. The advance guard reached settlements October 30, and sent back supplies, which came none too soon, for the men were in a starving condition. When the remnants of Montgomery's and Arnold's armies appeared before Quebec, Dec. 5, 1775, they were defeated. Although the Cambridge detachment was in the thick of the fight, Joshua Reed and Richard Cole were fortunate to escape capture. The former applied for a bounty coat Jan. 10, 1776, and the latter February 26. Their comrade in Captain Hall's company, Samuel Ingalls, of Stoneham, was not so fortunate. Captain Hall's petition in his favor tells his story: Medford, October 25th, 1776. This may Certifie
Charles (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
piece of land in Granby upon which $100 was realized. His estate was not settled until 1805. A man of great hospitality, charity, and charm of manner, Colonel Royall lacked the firmness which the times necessitated. He was never considered an active enemy of the Colonies, but the principle of the times was, Who is not for us is against us. After the Battle of Lexington the British were completely surrounded on the land side. They, however, held the harbor and the rivers Mystic and Charles. Men-of-war were ordered up these rivers as far as the tide would allow. Cannon were ordered to be placed on Bunker Hill to annoy the enemy if they attempted to go to Medford by water. A company of militia was raised in the town, and was instructed to remain there till further orders, holding themselves ready to march at a minute's notice. The General Court ordered that all the cattle on Hog, Snake, and Noddle's Islands should be driven back into the country. The Selectmen of M
Long Island City (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
Hampshire County and elsewhere to hire the men. The treasury was empty, and the Town Treasurer was empowered to borrow £ 240 to pay the men. Benjamin Hall loaned £ 66-13-4, Richard Hall, £ 53-6-8, and Stephen Hall, Tertius, £ 120. This did not prove enough, and £ 226-5-4 was raised by private subscription. Seventy-four men contributed sums varying from £ 24 to pay. The Canadian army having retired to Crown Point, these recruits were sent to Ticonderoga. After the defeat of the army at Long Island, alarm men were called for. September 23 thirteen men marched to New York, and served about two months. We have not found the name of one of these men. Drafts followed thick and fast. In November and December men were called for. Some of those drawn enlisted for the war. Others paid substitutes. At that time every fifth man was ordered into the army, either for home defence or in New York. Men were suffering from camp distemper at Ticonderoga; Forts Washington and Lee had been evacuate<
Canada (Canada) (search for this): chapter 2
ved No Coate Isaac Hall, Captain. Samuel Ingall's received his coat money, Oct. 30, 1776. While these men were enduring hunger, cold, and pestilence in Canada the army at home were drawing their lines closer and closer around the enemy at Boston. Captain Hall's company was ordered to Dorchester Heights; fifteen men acountry. On the day when the Declaration was adopted the voters of Medford were conferring about bounty, which was to be paid to thirty men called for to go to Canada. With reports of Canadian defeats, and the personal experiences of their townsmen fresh in their minds, men were slow to come forward, in spite of bounty offeredll, Tertius, £ 120. This did not prove enough, and £ 226-5-4 was raised by private subscription. Seventy-four men contributed sums varying from £ 24 to pay. The Canadian army having retired to Crown Point, these recruits were sent to Ticonderoga. After the defeat of the army at Long Island, alarm men were called for. September
Quebec (Canada) (search for this): chapter 2
the number of the regiment. This was the first attempt at a uniform for the army. Medford women spun, wove, and made 60 of these coats. Two Medford men, Richard Cole and Joshua Reed, Jr., enlisted in September for the ill-fated expedition to Quebec, under Arnold. The troops marched from Cambridge September 13, and camped that night in Medford. They then marched to Newburyport, where they took transports for the Kennebec. On their march through the wilderness they were overtaken by a st large part of their provisions. The advance guard reached settlements October 30, and sent back supplies, which came none too soon, for the men were in a starving condition. When the remnants of Montgomery's and Arnold's armies appeared before Quebec, Dec. 5, 1775, they were defeated. Although the Cambridge detachment was in the thick of the fight, Joshua Reed and Richard Cole were fortunate to escape capture. The former applied for a bounty coat Jan. 10, 1776, and the latter February 26.
Bennington, Vt. (Vermont, United States) (search for this): chapter 2
, and drilling the new recruits who had taken the places of those who entered the army in the spring. July brought bad news. Ticonderoga was evacuated. At first only a rumor, the news was speedily confirmed by a letter from Dr. Osgood's brother, who was one of the garrison. The retreating army was overtaken at Hubbardton, Vt., and there Col. Ebenezer Francis, a Medford boy, whose home was then in Beverly, was killed. He had organized his regiment the previous January, and marched to Bennington; and from there to New York State. On the 25th of September news of the first day's battle at Saratoga came to Medford. It had been fought on the 17th. Nearly every man who was in service from the town was in Gates's army. You who remember the Civil War know the thrill which swept over the town when the news arrived. Little cared the people that day for the disagreements of Arnold and Gates. They asked for the safety of John Brooks, Francis Tufts, John Le Bosquet, and the rest.
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