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read before you in which Governor Brooks has been spoken of at length, I have devoted very little time to him to-night, but I wish to say that the more I study his military and private life, the more I venerate and admire him. Medford may feel honored for all time, to count among her sons this friend of Lafayette and George Washington. One by one the landmarks of the olden time have disappeared. A few are left—among them the Watson House, where General Brooks entertained Washington in 1789; the Royall House, one of the centres of Colonial splendor; and the Garrison House, where Benjamin Hall, Jr., took his bride in 1777, and which was called the old brick house long before that day. The site where we meet to-night was the home in the days of the Revolution of Ebenezer Hall, the baker. He was a faithful civil officer in the patriot cause. And just across the street, under the budding trees, we see the graves of those whose hearts beat fast with patriotic fervor on that ei
February, 1778 AD (search for this): chapter 2
commissioned officers and privates sheltered twelve men—a space three feet by six to each man. Clothing was so scarce that those on guard borrowed from those off duty. For weeks in succession men were on half allowance—for four or five days being without bread, and then as many more without meat. The unusually severe winter which made Burgoyne's army shiver and complain of ill-treatment at Winter Hill made the condition of the Continentals at Valley Forge almost unendurable. In February, 1778, Rev. Edward Brooks came home from captivity at Halifax. He had been chaplain of the frigate Hancock, built at Newburyport by order of Congress in December, 1775. She had been taken by the British man-of-war Rainbow renamed the Iris, and attached to the British fleet. Mr. Brooks was exchanged for Parson Lewis, a British chaplain, and left Halifax on the Favorite, Jan. 29, 1778. While in Nova Scotia he had the small-pox. He was not strong when commissioned; he returned with health hop
December 5th, 1775 AD (search for this): chapter 2
s marched from Cambridge September 13, and camped that night in Medford. They then marched to Newburyport, where they took transports for the Kennebec. On their march through the wilderness they were overtaken by a storm which ruined a large part of their provisions. The advance guard reached settlements October 30, and sent back supplies, which came none too soon, for the men were in a starving condition. When the remnants of Montgomery's and Arnold's armies appeared before Quebec, Dec. 5, 1775, they were defeated. Although the Cambridge detachment was in the thick of the fight, Joshua Reed and Richard Cole were fortunate to escape capture. The former applied for a bounty coat Jan. 10, 1776, and the latter February 26. Their comrade in Captain Hall's company, Samuel Ingalls, of Stoneham, was not so fortunate. Captain Hall's petition in his favor tells his story: Medford, October 25th, 1776. This may Certifie that Mr. Samoel Engols Belonged To my Company in 1775 and
October 30th (search for this): chapter 2
en spun, wove, and made 60 of these coats. Two Medford men, Richard Cole and Joshua Reed, Jr., enlisted in September for the ill-fated expedition to Quebec, under Arnold. The troops marched from Cambridge September 13, and camped that night in Medford. They then marched to Newburyport, where they took transports for the Kennebec. On their march through the wilderness they were overtaken by a storm which ruined a large part of their provisions. The advance guard reached settlements October 30, and sent back supplies, which came none too soon, for the men were in a starving condition. When the remnants of Montgomery's and Arnold's armies appeared before Quebec, Dec. 5, 1775, they were defeated. Although the Cambridge detachment was in the thick of the fight, Joshua Reed and Richard Cole were fortunate to escape capture. The former applied for a bounty coat Jan. 10, 1776, and the latter February 26. Their comrade in Captain Hall's company, Samuel Ingalls, of Stoneham, was n
June 22nd (search for this): chapter 2
borers digging a cellar. The bodies were removed to the Salem-street cemetery by the sexton, Mr. Jacob Brooks. When an old man, he took his grandson, Mr. Vining, to the spot and said: Here is where the Revolutionary soldiers are laid. Somebody will want to know sometime. After the battle of June 17 Winter Hill was occupied by Provincial troops, who immediately set about fortifying it. They had few implements to work with, having lost a large part of their scanty store at Charlestown. June 22 the General Court sent a message requesting the town of Medford to immediately supply Major Hale with as many spades and shovels as they can spare, as it is of importance to the safety of this Colony that the works begun on Winter Hill be finished, and that they will be retarded unless soon supplied with tools. The months between June, 1775, and March, 1776, when Boston was evacuated, were full of alarms. The enemy were expected to march out at any time. General Washington ordered, Jul
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