hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Medford (Massachusetts, United States) 457 1 Browse Search
Benjamin Woodbridge 50 2 Browse Search
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) 34 0 Browse Search
Mathew Cradock 33 1 Browse Search
Caleb Brooks 25 3 Browse Search
John Brooks 25 7 Browse Search
Aaron Porter 23 3 Browse Search
Isaac Royall 22 4 Browse Search
Maria Gowen Brooks 22 0 Browse Search
Horace Brooks 21 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 3.. Search the whole document.

Found 746 total hits in 235 results.

... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ...
Daniel Reed (search for this): chapter 2
r regiment was stationed in the road leading to Lechmere Point, and late in the day was ordered to Charlestown. On arriving at Bunker Hill (the real Bunker Hill) General Putnam ordered part of the regiment to throw up entrenchments there; another detachment went to the rail fence with the New Hampshire men; and a third, with their colonel, went to the redoubt. After the battle they slept on their arms at Prospect Hill. Three Medford men were under Stark: Rev. David Osgood, chaplain; Daniel Reed, drummer; and Robert Bushby. Although Medford was not the scene of battle, she was near enough to experience the excitement and bitterness of war. We can imagine the people huddled in little groups on Pasture Hill, or on the marshes, hearing the boom of cannon, seeing the smoke of burning Charlestown, but, on account of the position of Bunker and Breed's hills, seeing only a part of the actual battle. In the afternoon Major McClary, of Epsom, N. H., came galloping back to town for b
n instant Revere thought of the Medford road which he had passed a moment before. Suddenly wheeling, he dashed back toward Winter Hill, and was well on his way to Medford before the astonished horsemen had extricated themselves from a clay-pit in which they found themselves floundering. Early on the morning of the 19th the minute-men were in motion. The company consisted of fifty-nine men. Tradition says that they joined Maj. John Brooks and the Reading men, encountered the British at Merriam's Corner, and pursued them to their boats. It was not strange that the Medford company should follow Major Brooks. He was a Medford boy, and only two years before had left the home of Dr. Simon Tufts, where he was educated, to practice medicine in Reading. Probably some of the men had been drilled by him in school-boy days in the vacant lot back of the doctor's house. Scarcely can we imagine the excitement of that day. The regulars had started on their second expedition, and this time
Aaron Tufts (search for this): chapter 2
e assault, the enemy wavered, and the whole regiment rushed into the fort. The names of the men who made that gallant charge should be cherished in Medford history beside that of their brave leader. They were William Cutter, Francis Tufts, Aaron Tufts, George Tufts, Daniel Bailey, John Le Bosquet, Henry Le Bosquet, and John Le Bosquet, Jr. And just here a Medford tradition must be modified. The History of Medford says that Sergt. Francis Tufts was promoted to adjutant, on the field at W and was a veteran of the New York campaigns. It is said that he was the son-in-law of Col. Isaac Royall. His son Thomas, at his father's death, changed his name to Sables. Thomas Savels the soldier has numerous descendants in Medford. Aaron Tufts and William Bucknam were also veterans, and had been honorably discharged from the army six months before. William Polly, a youth of nineteen, had served three months in New Jersey, in 1779. He was a kinsman of William Polly who was shot a
Caleb Brooks (search for this): chapter 2
tted office in 1778, and at that time received £ 10-6-8, for his extraordinary services and expense as Treasurer. Ebenezer Brooks, Jr., was a half brother of Governor Brooks. He died in September, 1775. Deacon Kidder died in 1777. For years before his day, and almost continuously since, there has been a Deacon Kidder in Medford.rd minute-men, was a brother of Benjamin Hall, the Representative, and Richard Hall, the Town Clerk. He was in business with the former. His lieutenant was Caleb Brooks, brickmaker, a half brother of Dr. John Brooks. Ensign Stephen Hall was the eldest son of Stephen Hall, Tertius. He was born Jan. 3, 1745, and died at Revered the enemy at Boston. Captain Hall's company was ordered to Dorchester Heights; fifteen men at least were in Capt. Stephen Dana's company at The Lines. Capt. Caleb Brooks was at Prospect Hill. A few other men were at Fort No. 3, March 17, 1776, the enemy, seeing the determined attitude of the Provincials, sailed for Halif
Lydia Maria Child (search for this): chapter 2
d Osgood and Edward Brooks were exceptions. At the time of the Revolution several gentlemen in Medford owned slaves. They were uniformly well treated. Mr. Zachariah Pool owned a slave named Scipio. In his will Mr. Pool left money to Benjamin Hall and others, in trust, for Scipio's support. He was boarded with a family of free negroes, and when he died his guardians followed him to the grave. This story was told me by one of Mr. Pool's descendants, and is in contradiction of Mrs. Lydia Maria Child's version, in one of her books, which says that Scipio was sold at the settlement of the estate. The negro's name appears on the tax list in 1778. Prince was a negro servant of Stephen Hall, Esq. He married Chloe, the servant of Richard Hall, in 1772. An amusing story is told of Prince's struggle with a sixty-five-pound bass in Mystic river, at low tide. The negro tried to carry the fish to land in his arms. Two trials proved failures, but the third was successful. Prince tho
Stephen Hall (search for this): chapter 2
e, and Richard Hall, the Town Clerk. He was in business with the former. His lieutenant was Caleb Brooks, brickmaker, a half brother of Dr. John Brooks. Ensign Stephen Hall was the eldest son of Stephen Hall, Tertius. He was born Jan. 3, 1745, and died at Revere in 1817. His granddaughter said of him: I remember my grandfath the spinning-wheels were humming, and garments were being made for the soldiers. The men were taking care that the town's stock of powder did not run low. Lieut. Stephen Hall, 4th, and Lieut. Jonathan Porter were keeping the ranks of their company full, and drilling the new recruits who had taken the places of those who entered tbly claimed him, and he returned to Medford in the early part of 1778. In June, 1778, he went into the army again for nine months, this time with the consent of Mr. Hall, for on May 25 Prince signed the following receipt: Received of the Town of Medford, by Richard Hall $35 in part for my bounty from said town which I promise to
Jacob Brooks (search for this): chapter 2
ands and sons, it was a blessing to do something for their New Hampshire comrades. Among these faithful women was Sarah Bradlee Fulton, who later proved her bravery by carrying despatches into Boston during the siege, making the journey on foot at dead of night. In 1849 the graves of twenty-five soldiers of the Revolution, supposed to be New Hampshire men, were found on Water street by laborers digging a cellar. The bodies were removed to the Salem-street cemetery by the sexton, Mr. Jacob Brooks. When an old man, he took his grandson, Mr. Vining, to the spot and said: Here is where the Revolutionary soldiers are laid. Somebody will want to know sometime. After the battle of June 17 Winter Hill was occupied by Provincial troops, who immediately set about fortifying it. They had few implements to work with, having lost a large part of their scanty store at Charlestown. June 22 the General Court sent a message requesting the town of Medford to immediately supply Major Hale w
Hannah Breed (search for this): chapter 2
bt. After the battle they slept on their arms at Prospect Hill. Three Medford men were under Stark: Rev. David Osgood, chaplain; Daniel Reed, drummer; and Robert Bushby. Although Medford was not the scene of battle, she was near enough to experience the excitement and bitterness of war. We can imagine the people huddled in little groups on Pasture Hill, or on the marshes, hearing the boom of cannon, seeing the smoke of burning Charlestown, but, on account of the position of Bunker and Breed's hills, seeing only a part of the actual battle. In the afternoon Major McClary, of Epsom, N. H., came galloping back to town for bandages. He had scant time to answer the numberless questions of the people who crowded around him. Putting spurs to his horse, he hurried back, only to fall a victim to the murderous fire from the ships in the river, as he crossed Charlestown Neck. His retreating comrades found his body, from which his pistols and valuables had been stolen. They
Zachariah Pool (search for this): chapter 2
id Osgood and Edward Brooks were exceptions. At the time of the Revolution several gentlemen in Medford owned slaves. They were uniformly well treated. Mr. Zachariah Pool owned a slave named Scipio. In his will Mr. Pool left money to Benjamin Hall and others, in trust, for Scipio's support. He was boarded with a family ofMr. Pool left money to Benjamin Hall and others, in trust, for Scipio's support. He was boarded with a family of free negroes, and when he died his guardians followed him to the grave. This story was told me by one of Mr. Pool's descendants, and is in contradiction of Mrs. Lydia Maria Child's version, in one of her books, which says that Scipio was sold at the settlement of the estate. The negro's name appears on the tax list in 1778. Mr. Pool's descendants, and is in contradiction of Mrs. Lydia Maria Child's version, in one of her books, which says that Scipio was sold at the settlement of the estate. The negro's name appears on the tax list in 1778. Prince was a negro servant of Stephen Hall, Esq. He married Chloe, the servant of Richard Hall, in 1772. An amusing story is told of Prince's struggle with a sixty-five-pound bass in Mystic river, at low tide. The negro tried to carry the fish to land in his arms. Two trials proved failures, but the third was successful. Princ
A. H. Evans (search for this): chapter 2
, we see the graves of those whose hearts beat fast with patriotic fervor on that eighteenth of April one hundred twenty-three years ago. There they rest—the Committee of Safety, the Representatives to the General Court, the heroes of Stillwater, the patriot preachers, the minute-men, and the heroic women, side by side. Over their graves waves the Star Spangled Banner, without a stripe lost and with many stars gained since they fought and suffered beneath its folds. May we preserve what they began! A union of States none can sever, A union of hearts and a union of hands, And the flag of our Union forever. Sarah Bradlee Fulton Chapter, D. A. R. Officers for 1899. RegentMRS. Mary B. Loomis. Vice-RegentMISS Ella L. Burbank. ChaplainMRS. Sarah E. Fuller. SecretaryMISS Helen T. Wild. RegistrarMRS. Emma W. Goodwin. TreasurerMISS Sarah L. Clark. HistorianMISS Eliza M. Gill. Executive Board. Mrs. Hannah E. Ayers. Mrs. C. Edith Kidder. Mrs. A. H. Evans
... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ...