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f the river being quite steep. The records of the town of Medford prior to the year 1674 having been lost or destroyed, and a portion of the records of the County Court of Middlesex being also lost or destroyed, information concerning the early roads of Medford is scant and most unsatisfactory. Some information can, however, be gathered from the remaining county records, the records of other towns, and from deeds. Salem street is shown upon a map supposed to have been made in the year 1633, and Main street and the Menotomy road (Broadway) on one made in 1637 (see Historical Register for October, 1898, pages 120 and 122). Salem street was spoken of as early as the year 1638, by the several names of Salle path, Salem path, Salem highway, The way to Mistick, and Salem path to Mistick Ford. A portion of High street was also spoken of in the same year as the Ware highway, and later as The way to the Wears. The River road (a part of Riverside avenue) was referred to in a deed dated
rior to the year 1674 having been lost or destroyed, and a portion of the records of the County Court of Middlesex being also lost or destroyed, information concerning the early roads of Medford is scant and most unsatisfactory. Some information can, however, be gathered from the remaining county records, the records of other towns, and from deeds. Salem street is shown upon a map supposed to have been made in the year 1633, and Main street and the Menotomy road (Broadway) on one made in 1637 (see Historical Register for October, 1898, pages 120 and 122). Salem street was spoken of as early as the year 1638, by the several names of Salle path, Salem path, Salem highway, The way to Mistick, and Salem path to Mistick Ford. A portion of High street was also spoken of in the same year as the Ware highway, and later as The way to the Wears. The River road (a part of Riverside avenue) was referred to in a deed dated 1657 as The common Highway leading from the Mansion House (Wellington
ing also lost or destroyed, information concerning the early roads of Medford is scant and most unsatisfactory. Some information can, however, be gathered from the remaining county records, the records of other towns, and from deeds. Salem street is shown upon a map supposed to have been made in the year 1633, and Main street and the Menotomy road (Broadway) on one made in 1637 (see Historical Register for October, 1898, pages 120 and 122). Salem street was spoken of as early as the year 1638, by the several names of Salle path, Salem path, Salem highway, The way to Mistick, and Salem path to Mistick Ford. A portion of High street was also spoken of in the same year as the Ware highway, and later as The way to the Wears. The River road (a part of Riverside avenue) was referred to in a deed dated 1657 as The common Highway leading from the Mansion House (Wellington) unto Charlestown Commons and Meadford House. It may, therefore, be confidently asserted that Salem and Main stre
h of the 7th month, 1646, Edward Convers and Samuel Richardson are appointed to lay out a highway between this town and Mistick Bridge, being joined with some of Charlestown, and some of Mistick House. Of the doings of this committee, or from what source their authority emanated, we are unable to determine (probably from the County Court). It is interesting, however, to note that the town of Medford was represented by some of Mistick House. (The County Courts were established in the year 1643; the records of Middlesex commence in the year 1649.) June 21, 1659, the records of the County Court say that The Court doth order that 4 persons, indifferently chosen, two of them in Watertown and two in Charlestown, to lay out the highway between Cambridge and Medford. This location cannot be determined; probably by the way of the mill on Mistick river, and very likely the first laying out of Grove street. On June 16, 1663, a committee was appointed by the County Court to lay out a h
hat where lands are fenced in, to stake out the road at least four rods wide, and where the land was low and wet, there to lay out the same six or more rods in breadth. . . . April 7, 1674. The committee to lay out the highway between Mistick bridge and Woburn made its report. It is impossible to tell from the description where this way was located; such landmarks as the Halfway swamp, Bare Hill, and Elbow Hill are mentioned. It probably includes substantially the laying out of the year 1646, and is no doubt the way from Woburn to Cradock bridge as it exists at the present day, through North Winthrop, Woburn, High, and Main streets. On the above-mentioned day the committee appointed to settle the highway between Cambridge and Malden made its report: From the new County road by the Slate Hill, over the sorrelly plain through Mr. Winthrop's farm to the road leading to Mistick Bridge, and from there over Gravelly Bridge, and to the left over the plains to Malden. A portion of th
July 14th, 1646 AD (search for this): chapter 4
he settlement of the colony. Indeed, of the six great highways that existed in Medford prior to the year 1700, viz., Main, Salem, High, Grove, and Woburn streets, and a portion of Riverside avenue, it is hard to tell as to which should be given the claim of priority. Perhaps Fulton street, or the Stoneham road, should have been included in the above list, although there is no evidence of its use throughout its entire length until a later period. Woburn records say that on the 14th of the 7th month, 1646, Edward Convers and Samuel Richardson are appointed to lay out a highway between this town and Mistick Bridge, being joined with some of Charlestown, and some of Mistick House. Of the doings of this committee, or from what source their authority emanated, we are unable to determine (probably from the County Court). It is interesting, however, to note that the town of Medford was represented by some of Mistick House. (The County Courts were established in the year 1643; the rec
ghway in said town leading to Stoneham, come and say that they will not contend with the King. The Court having considered the same, order the said town to pay a fine of three shillings to be disposed of as the law directs, and that they pay fees and costs. Travellers on these roads were subject to the annoyance of opening and closing gates that had been erected across the ways by individuals through whose farms they passed. The early records of Charlestown say that in the year 1648 Mr. William Stitson be entreated to get a man to make up a fence of three rails and a gate at Mistick Bridge, to run from the river and over the highway to Mr. Winthrops' rails. And in 1658 Mr. Richard Russell and Thomas Lynde, were appointed to agree with Mr. Collins, to make a gate upon Mistick Bridge, to secure our commons from any stray cattle, the charges to be borne by the proprietors of the commons. In the year 1695 John Hall, Senior, was granted permission by the County Court to h
Richardson are appointed to lay out a highway between this town and Mistick Bridge, being joined with some of Charlestown, and some of Mistick House. Of the doings of this committee, or from what source their authority emanated, we are unable to determine (probably from the County Court). It is interesting, however, to note that the town of Medford was represented by some of Mistick House. (The County Courts were established in the year 1643; the records of Middlesex commence in the year 1649.) June 21, 1659, the records of the County Court say that The Court doth order that 4 persons, indifferently chosen, two of them in Watertown and two in Charlestown, to lay out the highway between Cambridge and Medford. This location cannot be determined; probably by the way of the mill on Mistick river, and very likely the first laying out of Grove street. On June 16, 1663, a committee was appointed by the County Court to lay out a highway between Woburn and Cambridge, through Medford
and Main street and the Menotomy road (Broadway) on one made in 1637 (see Historical Register for October, 1898, pages 120 and 122). Salem street was spoken of as early as the year 1638, by the several names of Salle path, Salem path, Salem highway, The way to Mistick, and Salem path to Mistick Ford. A portion of High street was also spoken of in the same year as the Ware highway, and later as The way to the Wears. The River road (a part of Riverside avenue) was referred to in a deed dated 1657 as The common Highway leading from the Mansion House (Wellington) unto Charlestown Commons and Meadford House. It may, therefore, be confidently asserted that Salem and Main streets, and a portion of South street, were among the first, if not the first, roads used in Medford, after the settlement of the colony. Indeed, of the six great highways that existed in Medford prior to the year 1700, viz., Main, Salem, High, Grove, and Woburn streets, and a portion of Riverside avenue, it is hard
ings to be disposed of as the law directs, and that they pay fees and costs. Travellers on these roads were subject to the annoyance of opening and closing gates that had been erected across the ways by individuals through whose farms they passed. The early records of Charlestown say that in the year 1648 Mr. William Stitson be entreated to get a man to make up a fence of three rails and a gate at Mistick Bridge, to run from the river and over the highway to Mr. Winthrops' rails. And in 1658 Mr. Richard Russell and Thomas Lynde, were appointed to agree with Mr. Collins, to make a gate upon Mistick Bridge, to secure our commons from any stray cattle, the charges to be borne by the proprietors of the commons. In the year 1695 John Hall, Senior, was granted permission by the County Court to hang a gate at the end of his land, that he may have the benefit of the improvements thereon. And in the year 1711 John Usher be allowed to hang two gates in the roads within his farm, one on
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