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Sugar Loaf Hill (Texas, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
aid out, across the plain, coming out upon the Menotomy road, at or near where the railroad bridge at North Somerville now stands, that being the point where Winters brook crosses the Menotomy road. The two bridges referred to were over Winters and Twopenny brooks, and the Sorrelly plain was situated between Main street and Broadway on the north and south, and between the two brooks on the east and west. The Sugar Loaf road (leading from Woburn street across Winthrop street, east of Sugar Loaf hill, into the woodlands) Ramshead and Brooks lanes were laid out as ways to the woodlots and pastures in the north part of the town. The irregular course of Brooks lane at its southerly end, with its sharply defined angles, as shown on the map, suggests that at some former time its location had been changed. Powder House road was the way to the Powder House, which now stands on land of Dr. Green, on the easterly side of Highland avenue. The easterly branch of Ramshead lane is suppos
Wheelers Mill (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
his gate as the way now lyeth, three rod, which is between said Brooks and Jno. Francis, bounded in said Francis his land, by stakes which we set up in some old postholes, about six feet within said Francis fence as it now stands, and to extend into said Brooks his land, to the full extent of three rod, and from said Brooks his gate to Symms his farm three rod. . . . Reserving to Samuel Brooks his barn, one end of which stands in the Highway: while the said barn stands, and no longer. Wheeler's mill had disappeared, and probably the dam was much out of repair; at all events, the ancient way was abandoned, and Mr. Ebenezer Brooks, who owned the land between High street and the river, no doubt soon obliterated all traces of it. Mr. John Francis owned sixty acres of land, with house and farm buildings thereon. In Middlesex Deeds it is described as bounded west on Mistick river and the Great pond; south by a highway to the Wares; east by a roadway to Woburn; and north by a ditch and
Marble Brook (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
and Timothy Wheeler purchased of Mr. Collins their estate in Medford and Charlestown commons they also acquired a right in the landing at the Rocks next to John Mirrable's (Marble's) house. Does not this name suggest the source of the name of Marble brook? Marble must have been a tenant of Mr. Collins (possibly of Mr. Cradock also), and no doubt occupied the lands upon the borders of the brook. There was a landing at Wilson's point (Wellington) on Three Mile brook (Malden river). There is ar House, which now stands on land of Dr. Green, on the easterly side of Highland avenue. The easterly branch of Ramshead lane is supposed to have been the way leading to the old mill, and the settlement in its vicinity, that was situated on Marble brook about a mile from High street. note.—The map published in connection with the foregoing paper is offered for the purpose of enabling our readers to locate the points of interest named therein. It contains marks and legends that have no c
Portsmouth (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
John H. Hooper. (Read before the Medford Historical Society, Jan. 17, 1898.) THERE can be no doubt but that the early paths or roads of Old Medford were located substantially where our great highways now are, and it is probable that in many cases they followed the old Indian trails along the banks of the river and out into the country. The territory about Mistick river was the favorite dwelling-place of the Pawtucket tribe of Indians, whose hunting-grounds extended as far east as Piscataqua, and as far north as Concord, on the Merrimac river. The nearest, and in fact the principal, land route between Salem and the other settlements on the eastern coast of New England, and Charlestown, Boston, and the other settlements on the south shore of Massachusetts bay, was through Medford by the way of what are now known as Salem, South, and Main streets, crossing the river at the ford, or, after the building of Mistick bridge, over that bridge. It is hardly possible that the ford
John H. Hooper (search for this): chapter 4
The roads of old Medford. by John H. Hooper. (Read before the Medford Historical Society, Jan. 17, 1898.) THERE can be no doubt but that the early paths or roads of Old Medford were located substantially where our great highways now are, and it is probable that in many cases they followed the old Indian trails along the banks of the river and out into the country. The territory about Mistick river was the favorite dwelling-place of the Pawtucket tribe of Indians, whose hunting-grounds extended as far east as Piscataqua, and as far north as Concord, on the Merrimac river. The nearest, and in fact the principal, land route between Salem and the other settlements on the eastern coast of New England, and Charlestown, Boston, and the other settlements on the south shore of Massachusetts bay, was through Medford by the way of what are now known as Salem, South, and Main streets, crossing the river at the ford, or, after the building of Mistick bridge, over that bridge. It is
Mathew Cradock (search for this): chapter 4
iend, and also Wade's Landing. Charlestown laid out a way from this landing to its woodlots, on the northerly line of Mr. Cradock's farm, the southerly end of this way being at or near the present location of Cross street. It has been said that Chn derived, it is certain that they were not so clearly defined as to put them beyond controversy. It is probable that Mr. Cradock's agent did not object when Charlestown first laid out or used these ways, but when the estate passed out of the hands of Mr. Cradock's heirs the new owners were disposed to question that town's rights, both to the landing and the ways. Charlestown records say that the highway was turned that led up to the rocks in Charlestown woodlots, north of Mistick river and this name suggest the source of the name of Marble brook? Marble must have been a tenant of Mr. Collins (possibly of Mr. Cradock also), and no doubt occupied the lands upon the borders of the brook. There was a landing at Wilson's point (Wellin
r near Cross street and running easterly across the boundary line between Medford and Charlestown (that part of Charlestown being afterwards set off to Malden) to Wilson's point, known in our day as Wellington. That part of Riverside avenue between River street and Cross street was laid out in the year 1746, in order to make a t. The River road was in use from the time of the first settlement of the town, running along the bank of the river—it was the only means of communication between Wilson's point, the several landing-places on the river, and the bridge and ford; and as has been previously said, that the part of Riverside avenue from River street tole must have been a tenant of Mr. Collins (possibly of Mr. Cradock also), and no doubt occupied the lands upon the borders of the brook. There was a landing at Wilson's point (Wellington) on Three Mile brook (Malden river). There is also a landing spoken of in ancient deeds that cannot be accurately located. The indications ar
James Bean (search for this): chapter 4
ide of the lane, near to the fishing-place. It was laid out two rods wide from Main street to the ford or landing-place. This lane was afterwards extended as far west as the third rangeway. Union street (now Swan street), or that part of it leading east from Main street, was laid out about the year 1720. It was laid out two rods wide, and was called the Way to the wharfs. Another way, one rod in width, was laid out about the same time. It is the way now leading from Main street to Mr. Bean's coal yard. A part of Broadway was once situated within the limits of Medford. That portion of Main street between South street and the Square was not in use until after the building of the bridge. In March, 1695, the Hon. John Usher and Mr. David Jeffreys motioned the County Court to alter and remove the highway through their farms, late the farm of Governor Winthrop, and the Court appointed a committee to consider the same. The following is the motion: Sheweth that havi
Paul Curtis (search for this): chapter 4
tomy road, shut up and improved by Mr. Russell. This way has since been laid out as a county road, and is known as Curtis street in Somerville and Winthrop street in Medford. Mr. James Tufts' house stood on what is now the corner of South and Curtis streets, and was removed by Mr. Paul Curtis to a location at the easterly corner of Summer street and Maple avenue. It was taken down a few years ago. Third Rangeway.—Then we began on Menotomy road, and measured the third Rangeway northerly, pMr. Paul Curtis to a location at the easterly corner of Summer street and Maple avenue. It was taken down a few years ago. Third Rangeway.—Then we began on Menotomy road, and measured the third Rangeway northerly, partly open, and then still northerly, shut up 20 rods, partly by Dickson, partly by Smith, this being Medford bounds, then proceeded still northerly to Medford river to a Rock, which measured 160 rods, shut up and improved by the Rev. Mr. Smith. This way has since been opened as a public way, except that portion between West street and the river, and is known as North street in both Medford and Somerville. The rock above mentioned must have been the southerly point of Rock hill, on the op
John Mirrable (search for this): chapter 4
ears ago the town of Medford claimed rights in this way and landing, and suit was brought to test the ownership thereof. The case was decided in favor of the owner of the land through which the way passed, upon the general ground that the public right, if it ever existed, had been lost by long-continued disuse. When Thomas Brooks and Timothy Wheeler purchased of Mr. Collins their estate in Medford and Charlestown commons they also acquired a right in the landing at the Rocks next to John Mirrable's (Marble's) house. Does not this name suggest the source of the name of Marble brook? Marble must have been a tenant of Mr. Collins (possibly of Mr. Cradock also), and no doubt occupied the lands upon the borders of the brook. There was a landing at Wilson's point (Wellington) on Three Mile brook (Malden river). There is also a landing spoken of in ancient deeds that cannot be accurately located. The indications are, however, that it was located somewhere between the Railroad and
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