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Winter Hill (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
uch worse, both for teams and travellers. The Hon. John Usher having shown us a way between two Bridges, near his Spring: which runs southwest and into Menotomy road that leads to Charlestown, and that also is in use and further than the old road is, as it was formerly used—The committee's report ends rather abruptly, no recommendation being attached to it. The course of the road was not changed; the evident design of the petitioners was to have that part of Main street running over Winter hill abandoned, and a new way laid out, across the plain, coming out upon the Menotomy road, at or near where the railroad bridge at North Somerville now stands, that being the point where Winters brook crosses the Menotomy road. The two bridges referred to were over Winters and Twopenny brooks, and the Sorrelly plain was situated between Main street and Broadway on the north and south, and between the two brooks on the east and west. The Sugar Loaf road (leading from Woburn street across
Elbow Hill (Montana, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
tle the highway from Cambridge to Malden, with instructions to the latter committee, that where lands are fenced in, to stake out the road at least four rods wide, and where the land was low and wet, there to lay out the same six or more rods in breadth. . . . April 7, 1674. The committee to lay out the highway between Mistick bridge and Woburn made its report. It is impossible to tell from the description where this way was located; such landmarks as the Halfway swamp, Bare Hill, and Elbow Hill are mentioned. It probably includes substantially the laying out of the year 1646, and is no doubt the way from Woburn to Cradock bridge as it exists at the present day, through North Winthrop, Woburn, High, and Main streets. On the above-mentioned day the committee appointed to settle the highway between Cambridge and Malden made its report: From the new County road by the Slate Hill, over the sorrelly plain through Mr. Winthrop's farm to the road leading to Mistick Bridge, and from t
Stoneham (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
f Riverside avenue, it is hard to tell as to which should be given the claim of priority. Perhaps Fulton street, or the Stoneham road, should have been included in the above list, although there is no evidence of its use throughout its entire lengthroadway to Woburn; and north by a ditch and hedge (dated March 2, 1692). In the year 1735 a highway was laid out from Stoneham to Medford, from Spot Pond swamp to the County Road by the Brickyards in Medford. This way is now known as Fulton stree In the year 1769 the town of Medford being presented for not amending and repairing a highway in said town leading to Stoneham, come and say that they will not contend with the King. The Court having considered the same, order the said to location of the way from Salem street to the woodlots was definitely settled by its becoming a part of the highway from Stoneham to Medford. There were several ancient ways east of the marketplace (the Square) dating back to about the year 1700.
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 4
here our great highways now are, and it is probable that in many cases they followed the old Indian trails along the banks of the river and out into the country. The territory about Mistick river was the favorite dwelling-place of the Pawtucket tribe of Indians, whose hunting-grounds extended as far east as Piscataqua, and as far north as Concord, on the Merrimac river. The nearest, and in fact the principal, land route between Salem and the other settlements on the eastern coast of New England, and Charlestown, Boston, and the other settlements on the south shore of Massachusetts bay, was through Medford by the way of what are now known as Salem, South, and Main streets, crossing the river at the ford, or, after the building of Mistick bridge, over that bridge. It is hardly possible that the ford could have been much used after the building of the bridge (at least while the bridge was passable). The rise of the tide from ten to twelve feet, twice in twenty-four hours, must h
Merrimack (United States) (search for this): chapter 4
rical Society, Jan. 17, 1898.) THERE can be no doubt but that the early paths or roads of Old Medford were located substantially where our great highways now are, and it is probable that in many cases they followed the old Indian trails along the banks of the river and out into the country. The territory about Mistick river was the favorite dwelling-place of the Pawtucket tribe of Indians, whose hunting-grounds extended as far east as Piscataqua, and as far north as Concord, on the Merrimac river. The nearest, and in fact the principal, land route between Salem and the other settlements on the eastern coast of New England, and Charlestown, Boston, and the other settlements on the south shore of Massachusetts bay, was through Medford by the way of what are now known as Salem, South, and Main streets, crossing the river at the ford, or, after the building of Mistick bridge, over that bridge. It is hardly possible that the ford could have been much used after the building of t
Concord (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
e the Medford Historical Society, Jan. 17, 1898.) THERE can be no doubt but that the early paths or roads of Old Medford were located substantially where our great highways now are, and it is probable that in many cases they followed the old Indian trails along the banks of the river and out into the country. The territory about Mistick river was the favorite dwelling-place of the Pawtucket tribe of Indians, whose hunting-grounds extended as far east as Piscataqua, and as far north as Concord, on the Merrimac river. The nearest, and in fact the principal, land route between Salem and the other settlements on the eastern coast of New England, and Charlestown, Boston, and the other settlements on the south shore of Massachusetts bay, was through Medford by the way of what are now known as Salem, South, and Main streets, crossing the river at the ford, or, after the building of Mistick bridge, over that bridge. It is hardly possible that the ford could have been much used aft
Watertown (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
House. Of the doings of this committee, or from what source their authority emanated, we are unable to determine (probably from the County Court). It is interesting, however, to note that the town of Medford was represented by some of Mistick House. (The County Courts were established in the year 1643; the records of Middlesex commence in the year 1649.) June 21, 1659, the records of the County Court say that The Court doth order that 4 persons, indifferently chosen, two of them in Watertown and two in Charlestown, to lay out the highway between Cambridge and Medford. This location cannot be determined; probably by the way of the mill on Mistick river, and very likely the first laying out of Grove street. On June 16, 1663, a committee was appointed by the County Court to lay out a highway between Woburn and Cambridge, through Medford. The records of the County Court, commencing in the year 1664 and running to October, 1671, having been destroyed by fire, the location of
Little Gravel Creek (Alabama, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
is certain that they were not so clearly defined as to put them beyond controversy. It is probable that Mr. Cradock's agent did not object when Charlestown first laid out or used these ways, but when the estate passed out of the hands of Mr. Cradock's heirs the new owners were disposed to question that town's rights, both to the landing and the ways. Charlestown records say that the highway was turned that led up to the rocks in Charlestown woodlots, north of Mistick river and east of Gravelly creek, on request of Mr. Nathaniel Wade. In Middlesex Deeds, Book 10, page 416, may be found an agreement entered into between Mr. Nathaniel Wade and the town of Charlestown about a landing-place or bank called No Man's Friend. It was agreed that one-third of the bank next to Mistick bridge should be the sole property of the said Wade, and the remaining two-thirds, with a convenient highway thereto, should be held in common by the said Wade and the inhabitants of Charlestown; . . . and th
Mystic River (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
When Thomas Brooks and Timothy Wheeler purchased of Mr. Collins their estate in Medford and Charlestown commons they also acquired a right in the landing at the Rocks next to John Mirrable's (Marble's) house. Does not this name suggest the source of the name of Marble brook? Marble must have been a tenant of Mr. Collins (possibly of Mr. Cradock also), and no doubt occupied the lands upon the borders of the brook. There was a landing at Wilson's point (Wellington) on Three Mile brook (Malden river). There is also a landing spoken of in ancient deeds that cannot be accurately located. The indications are, however, that it was located somewhere between the Railroad and Boston-avenue bridges. On the south or Charlestown side of the river and west of Main street was a large tract of land called the Stinted Pastures owned by the inhabitants of the town of Charlestown, and divided into ranges about eighty rods in width, and between these ranges were laid out ways or rangeways, as the
Middlesex Village (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 4
eing quite steep. The records of the town of Medford prior to the year 1674 having been lost or destroyed, and a portion of the records of the County Court of Middlesex being also lost or destroyed, information concerning the early roads of Medford is scant and most unsatisfactory. Some information can, however, be gathered fresting, however, to note that the town of Medford was represented by some of Mistick House. (The County Courts were established in the year 1643; the records of Middlesex commence in the year 1649.) June 21, 1659, the records of the County Court say that The Court doth order that 4 persons, indifferently chosen, two of them in reet now runs, down to the river at a point near where Arlington street connects with Jerome street. March 22, 1708-9. Pursuant to a motion of the Sheriff of Middlesex, referring to a County road that is needful to be laid out from Menotomy road, so across Menotomy fields, over the Ware, through Medford, to the place called Mr.
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